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Re: [art_education] Clean Art Rooms

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  • Tanya Riehle
    I don t have the cleanest art room in the world, but its not bad. I always give 5 minutes, more if its a messy messy project to clean. They have the same
    Message 1 of 21 , Apr 6, 2006
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      I don't have the cleanest art room in the world, but its not bad. I always
      give 5 minutes, more if its a messy messy project to clean. They have the
      same routine everyday and it works really well. I also assign an area to my
      8th hour class, so John, Rose and Tim are at the sinks, 3 more put make sure
      desks are clean, 3 more do something else etc. That way they know what is
      theirs to clean and if its not done I can take 5 pts. From the weekly
      classroom particpation grade, which is on the check list that they do every
      Friday.

      Tanya
    • GINAMARIE YACOVELLI
      HI Anna, I clean up everyday after class for about 20 minutes. Sometimes I let it go it go by not putting everything totally away if I know I am going to be
      Message 2 of 21 , Apr 6, 2006
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        HI Anna,

        I clean up everyday after class for about 20 minutes. Sometimes I let
        it go it go by not putting everything totally away if I know I am going
        to be using it the next day.
        In the beginning of the school I was a first year art teacher as well
        and I never made the kids clean up. I have changed since then I end
        class 5 minutes early to have time for clean up. Since there are
        usually 22 of them it gets done a lot faster then if it were just me
        cleaning up.
        The kids do not mind (younger ones) in fact they are usually eager to
        be my helper so I have insisted everyone is a helper to keep from
        having to pick certain individuals.
        Hope this helps!!!

        Gina
        On Apr 6, 2006, at 3:09 PM, <Anna.Ball@...> wrote:

        Hi,
        Me again.

        I am a first year teacher and was wondering if it is typical or
        atypical to have a messy art room?  I look enviously at other (non-art)
        teachers' clean rooms.
        If you are an art teacher with a clean room, do you have any hints on
        how to do this?
        I leave enough time for students to clean, I demonstrate how I want
        things done--but only once at the begining.  Do I need to demonstrate
        more?  Should I incorporate cleaning up into their grades?

        Any suggestions would be very helpful.

        Thanks,
        Anna in South Dakota



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      • Act Silly 4 Art
        My first year of teaching art, my room was always messy because I couldn t keep up with cleaning it and I didn t ask my students to help. I figured it was my
        Message 3 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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           My first year of teaching art, my room was always messy because I couldn't keep up with cleaning it and I didn't ask my students to help.  I figured it was my room my responsibility.  After visiting another school's artroom and talking to that teacher I picked up a few tips that has helped me to keep my room clean and presentable.  One of the tips I picked up and use with my students is that I tell my students upper and lower grades that in order to leave my classroom each student has to give me a piece of trash from the floor.  I stand at the door with the trash can next to me and watch as each student shows me their trash then drops it in.  I love watching them scramble to find rubbish to give me so they can leave.  Another tip I picked up and use is if we are using paint that the students can't leave my room without giving me a clean brush and pallet.  Or if we are using any art tools that they have to hand those to me in order to leave.  Oh, and if their tables aren't wiped down they can't leave either... just because one person's side of the table is clean doesn't mean that person can leave it has to be everyone or no one from that table.  I can't tell you how much easier it is for me to keep my room clean and to clean it up.  I do spend about half an hour at the end of each day  spraying down the tables with disinfectant, lightly sweeping up and tightening up a bit... I do that because it is actually therapeutic, the cleaning helps me to wind down.  
           
          Hope this helps.
           
          cat
            Anna.Ball@... wrote:
          Hi,
          Me again.

          I am a first year teacher and was wondering if it is typical or atypical to have a messy art room?  I look enviously at other (non-art) teachers' clean rooms.
          If you are an art teacher with a clean room, do you have any hints on how to do this?
          I leave enough time for students to clean, I demonstrate how I want things done--but only once at the begining.  Do I need to demonstrate more?  Should I incorporate cleaning up into their grades?

          Any suggestions would be very helpful.

          Thanks,
          Anna in South Dakota



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        • tmwillis72
          I also have the problem of keeping not only a clean art room but an ORGANIZED artroom. There are piles all over and it gets to be very overwhelming. How do you
          Message 4 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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            I also have the problem of keeping not only a clean art room but an
            ORGANIZED artroom. There are piles all over and it gets to be very
            overwhelming. How do you keep the piles from creeping up on you? I
            feel like I can never get ahead. I am stuggling to find a system for
            storing art work as well as visual poster and lesson charts. Any
            helpful hints for these problems?

            As for my tip, my first year I also never enlisted the students and
            at the end of the day I was constantly organizng glue, scissors etc.
            What I have done this year to organize supplies is get those plastic
            shoe boxes and put 6 cups in each( I have 6 table) and put six items
            in each cup ( I have 6 chairs at the tables) so one box would have 6
            cups of 6 pencils. I then labled each box with the word of the item
            and a picture(for my esol kids). I recently made a chart the says
            where is? and listed the items and which side of the shelf they are
            on so I no longer hear where does this go.

            Hope this helps.

            Spring Break this week, yeah!!!! We are heading to Rome on sunday for
            a week so I look forward to sharing pictures with you.

            Tammy
          • Kiersten M. Bram
            Hi Anna, Like the others, I enlist the help of the students. I only have two sinks though so there are a few things I do to make it easier... We use
            Message 5 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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              Hi Anna,

              Like the others, I enlist the help of the students.  I only have two sinks though so there are a few things I do to make it easier... We use fingerpaint paper on paint palets so we just throw the paper away instead of washing  palets. Also, I pass out wet paper towels for students to wipe hands with. Then if tables are a mess they get more wet paper towels to wipe tables.  For the younger kids (k-2) sometimes I put a bowl of water on their table to rinse hands with if we are working with something really messy (paper mache, plaster, finger painting, etc.).  I also give out "art star" cards to fifth graders and this entitles them to come down ten minutes before the end of the school day and clean my room! They wipe my tables, stack chairs, sweep floors and clean out brushes and sinks. They love it, the custodians love it,  and I get to start the next day with a clean room - which means I love it, too!
              Hope this helps,
               Kiersten in Maryland

            • Victoria Patterson
              Hi Anna, Enlisting the help of students is a must...but there are things you can do to eliminate some of the time- consuming work. I use egg cartons as paint
              Message 6 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                Hi Anna,
                Enlisting the help of students is a must...but there are things you can do to eliminate some of the time- consuming work.  I use egg cartons as paint pallets ...it takes little time to throw them in a (LINED) trash can at the end of class...I gave away those little plastic and metal paint pallets 25 years ago.  Use styrofoam meat trays to roll printing ink and throw them away when clean-up time comes. I keep a HUGE stack of meat trays (all sizes and colors...the kids bring them in) and egg cartons (doesn't matter what kind...they all work for at least a class period) in my room all year. If the kids are doing detailed work with small brushes, use a meat tray as a Pallet, putting little dobs of paint on it. Then the kiddos can mix paint on their pallet just like an artist. As for washing brushes, I'm pretty anal about that.  I like kids to have quality brushes...not junk, so I buy quality, and insist it is taken care of. I used to wash them all myself, assuming the kids didn't do a "good-enough" job, but those days are gone!  Our brushes get washed twice after each use. Every time we painted for the first time in the year, I trained kids how I wanted the brushes washed...just like you show them how to "use" it with care.  At the end of class, each student is responsible to wash their own brush, and then put it in the "dirty brush tray" to soak. (usually a plastic tray or pan with water in it...NEVER standing up in a can or cup) If I need the brushes for the next class, they are ready to go after another rinse from me. If we are done with them for the day, they can soak until I get time to rinse again and lay flat to dry. The handles look awful...but the brush is great!
                I have a crew (3) of students who come in at the beginning and end of each day to put everything away and get set up for the next day.
                A few years ago, we lost almost all our preparation time, and consequently got more classes as well, so classes are back-to-back with no set-up time in between, and some days only 10 minutes of "prep" time all day, so when a class cleans up, they also set out appropriate materials for the next class.  I am fortunate to have plenty of storage, but everything has it's place, and my end-of-the-day helpers know where everything goes...without them, I'd be at school until 9 pm every day!!
                The art room tables are 3 feet wide, so I invest some of my budget each year to buy several rolls of 3 ft. x 1000 ft. brown butcher paper. We use this to quickly cover tables when doing a messy project. At the end of class, we "fold" it up into a neat package and throw away. Sometimes I even put several layers on the tables, so the kids can take off the top layer, exposing a new layer for the next class of paper mache or what-ever.
                By the end of the day, most things are cleaned up and there is little to do but organize a little and get ready for the next day.  Hope this helps!
                Vicki


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              • Jen Millward
                Hello everyone I m a lurker getting ideas and preparing myself for student teaching next year. I have a few questions and was hoping some of you might be
                Message 7 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                  Hello everyone

                   

                  I’m a lurker getting ideas and preparing myself for student teaching next year. I have a few questions and was hoping some of you might be willing to help me.

                   

                  First of all, are there any books which you would recommend for the budding art teacher to read? I recently bought “Survival Kit for the Elementary/Middle School Art Teacher” and “Survival Kit for the Secondary School Art Teacher” and cannot wait to look through those. I’m really not looking for anything specific, just trying to get a taste of what it takes to be an art teacher. Also hoping to get an idea of lesson plans to use for all ages.

                   

                  Secondly, I know art teacher positions are quite scarce so was wondering how many of you had to wait quite a while before being hired, and if so, what type of job did you have in the mean time? I am hoping to substitute teach but am trying to think of other jobs I could perform using my new art and teaching skills. Unfortunately we live in a rural community so the options are pretty limited.

                   

                  Thank you for your time and have a good weekend,

                  Jen M. from northern NY

                   

                • aliteachesart
                  I keep my student work in folders for each class with each day organized in a dedicated area. Each folder bulges with art show work and what ever we are
                  Message 8 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                    I keep my student work in folders for each class with each day organized in a dedicated
                    area. Each folder bulges with art show work and what ever we are working on. My tables
                    are coded as colors too, so each table has a folder that I can pass out instead of doing it
                    one student at a time. I put lessons in giant folders I make by stapling poster board
                    together on three sides. Everything goes in there; examples, books, posters, directions,
                    lesson plans, even special materials needed for the lesson. I write the grade on the
                    outside, along with material list, books we read and the author/ill. and how many classes
                    the lesson takes. I don't do the same lessons every year, and this helps me plan. Its good
                    for subplans too (have a big folder and let him/her choose).

                    While Tammy is in Rome on Spring Break I'll be organizing at my house- do you think
                    folders will work for winter sweaters and altoid tins? ALi
                  • gpercy1
                    Greetings- I have found it more difficult to motivate MS kids to clean than elementary. My room is not the cleanest anyway, but hey, it s the art room...Today
                    Message 9 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                      Greetings-

                      I have found it more difficult to motivate MS kids to clean than elementary. My room is not
                      the cleanest anyway, but hey, it's the art room...Today for example, we are cutting
                      styrofoam with 8th grade, doing plater sculptures with 7th and painting with 6th
                      grade...It'll be messy, but fun...I don't know if I could share a room with anyone because
                      I'd probably drive them nuts because I have a pretty high "threshold of cleanliness" as I
                      like to call it...But I guess that's one of the reasons I teach art..

                      Greg Percy

                      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "aliteachesart" <abenton@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I keep my student work in folders for each class with each day organized in a dedicated
                      > area. Each folder bulges with art show work and what ever we are working on. My
                      tables
                      > are coded as colors too, so each table has a folder that I can pass out instead of doing it
                      > one student at a time. I put lessons in giant folders I make by stapling poster board
                      > together on three sides. Everything goes in there; examples, books, posters,
                      directions,
                      > lesson plans, even special materials needed for the lesson. I write the grade on the
                      > outside, along with material list, books we read and the author/ill. and how many
                      classes
                      > the lesson takes. I don't do the same lessons every year, and this helps me plan. Its
                      good
                      > for subplans too (have a big folder and let him/her choose).
                      >
                      > While Tammy is in Rome on Spring Break I'll be organizing at my house- do you think
                      > folders will work for winter sweaters and altoid tins? ALi
                      >
                    • bruthrobson@aol.com
                      Vicky How do you keep the brown butcher paper in place. Doesn t sound like you tape it. Does it not slide around? Brenda
                      Message 10 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                        Vicky
                        How do you keep the brown butcher paper in place.  Doesn't sound like you tape it.
                        Does it not slide around?
                        Brenda
                      • Victoria Patterson
                        The brown paper gets taped to the tables...not on the ends, but rather on opposite sides...just 2 pieces of tape. I don t know what I d do without that paper.
                        Message 11 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                          The brown paper gets taped to the tables...not on the ends, but rather on opposite sides...just 2 pieces of tape. I don't know what I'd do without that paper. It comes in 40# and 50#...I prefer the 50#...it's much stronger, and stuff doesn't soak in as much.  I've done 3 paper mache classes in a row, and by layering the paper in the morning before classes, have made it through to lunch with full garbage cans, but a clean room to start the afternoon!
                          Vicki

                          bruthrobson@... wrote:
                          Vicky
                          How do you keep the brown butcher paper in place.  Doesn't sound like you tape it.
                          Does it not slide around?
                          Brenda


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                        • Patricia Jones Brigman
                          I am enjoying reading everyone s clean art room responses and taking notes! I have 4 classes back to back before lunch (grades 5, 3, 2, 4, in that order) and 3
                          Message 12 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                            I am enjoying reading everyone's clean art room responses and taking notes!  I have 4 classes back to back before lunch (grades 5, 3, 2, 4, in that order) and 3 after lunch (1, 1, and either 2 or 3), so I have to be really organized with each lesson.  One thing that really seems to take up time when we are painting is paper towels for blotting the brushes.  I usually have 2 large cups (big yogurt) or small buckets (gallon ice cream) with water at each table of 6 children.  I try to keep folded up paper towels (cheap brown paper towels from school) either under or next to these buckets for them to blot their brushes on.  When we paint, ALL classes paint, and we've worked out changing the water at the end of each class, and cleaning brushes, but I keep thinking that there has to be an easier way to blot our brushes!  Any advise on this?
                            :)
                            Patti
                             

                            Patti Brigman
                            Art Teacher
                            Walker Elementary

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: Victoria Patterson <westshoredesigns@...>
                            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Fri, 7 Apr 2006 07:19:03 -0700 (PDT)
                            Subject: Re: [art_education] Clean Art Rooms

                            Hi Anna,
                            Enlisting the help of students is a must...but there are things you can do to eliminate some of the time- consuming work.  I use egg cartons as paint pallets ...it takes little time to throw them in a (LINED) trash can at the end of class...I gave away those little plastic and metal paint pallets 25 years ago.  Use styrofoam meat trays to roll printing ink and throw them away when clean-up time comes. I keep a HUGE stack of meat trays (all sizes and colors...the kids bring them in) and egg cartons (doesn't matter what kind...they all work for at least a class period) in my room all year. If the kids are doing detailed work with small brushes, use a meat tray as a Pallet, putting little dobs of paint on it. Then the kiddos can mix paint on their pallet just like an artist. As for washing brushes, I'm pretty anal about that.  I like kids to have quality brushes...not junk, so I buy quality, and insist it is taken care of. I used to wash them all myself, assuming the kids didn't do a "good-enough" job, but those days are gone!  Our brushes get washed twice after each use. Every time we painted for the first time in the year, I trained kids how I wanted the brushes washed...just like you show them how to "use" it with care.  At the end of class, each student is responsible to wash their own brush, and then put it in the "dirty brush tray" to soak. (usually a plastic tray or pan with water in it...NEVER standing up in a can or cup) If I need the brushes for the next class, they are ready to go after another rinse from me. If we are done with them for the day, they can soak until I get time to rinse again and lay flat to dry. The handles look awful...but the brush is great!
                            I have a crew (3) of students who come in at the beginning and end of each day to put everything away and get set up for the next day.
                            A few years ago, we lost almost all our preparation time, and consequently got more classes as well, so classes are back-to-back with no set-up time in between, and some days only 10 minutes of "prep" time all day, so when a class cleans up, they also set out appropriate materials for the next class.  I am fortunate to have plenty of storage, but everything has it's place, and my end-of-the-day helpers know where everything goes...without them, I'd be at school until 9 pm every day!!
                          • Kiersten M. Bram
                            Hi Patti - Try using a damp sponge on the paint trays - it works perfect for blotting! And they can just be tossed in the sink afterwards and rinsed off and be
                            Message 13 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                              Hi Patti -
                              Try using a damp sponge on the paint trays - it works perfect for blotting! And they can just be tossed in the sink afterwards and rinsed off and be ready for the next class.  :-)
                              - Kiersten
                            • aliteachesart
                              When we paint, ALL classes paint, and ... I saw a great table set up at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amerst, MA (which is awesome). In the art
                              Message 14 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                                When we paint, ALL classes paint, and
                                > we've worked out changing the water at the end of each class, and cleaning
                                > brushes, but I keep thinking that there has to be an easier way to blot our
                                > brushes! Any advise on this?
                                > :)
                                > Patti
                                I saw a great table set up at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amerst, MA
                                (which is awesome). In the art studio area each table had a tray with a shallow water
                                container for sharing and a sponge on each side. The water paint boxes were on the tray
                                too, between the two sponges. It was organized and clean and four to six kids could
                                share without a problem. Hope it helps! Ali
                              • Michele
                                try the art teacher s book of lists....tons of great stuff in there.....Michele Jen Millward wrote: Hello everyone
                                Message 15 of 21 , Apr 7, 2006
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                                  try the art teacher's book of lists....tons of great stuff in there.....Michele

                                  Jen Millward <jenmillward@...> wrote:
                                  Hello everyone
                                   
                                  I’m a lurker getting ideas and preparing myself for student teaching next year. I have a few questions and was hoping some of you might be willing to help me.
                                   
                                  First of all, are there any books which you would recommend for the budding art teacher to read? I recently bought “Survival Kit for the Elementary/Middle School Art Teacher” and “Survival Kit for the Secondary School Art Teacher” and cannot wait to look through those. I’m really not looking for anything specific, just trying to get a taste of what it takes to be an art teacher. Also hoping to get an idea of lesson plans to use for all ages.
                                   
                                  Secondly, I know art teacher positions are quite scarce so was wondering how many of you had to wait quite a while before being hired, and if so, what type of job did you have in the mean time? I am hoping to substitute teach but am trying to think of other jobs I could perform using my new art and teaching skills. Unfortunately we live in a rural community so the options are pretty limited.
                                   
                                  Thank you for your time and have a good weekend,
                                  Jen M. from northern NY
                                   



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                                • go4art@juno.com
                                  I am loving this thread :-) I m with Greg...it s an art room, a creative space....and a jam packed full one too!...with an on going array of projects and
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Apr 8, 2006
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                                    I am loving this thread :-) I'm with Greg...it's an art room, a creative space....and a jam packed full one too!...with an on going array of projects and accessible materials.

                                    Not to say it's not organized. I keep tons of things organized in clear plastic bins with labels. Also, copy paper boxes are a good size and stack well. We even paint them or cover with artist gift wrap paper, etc!

                                    Shelves and drawers of material labeled, procedures for cleaning up... particularly on "those" days. I think students need to learn/know that part of their responsibility as an artist is to maintain the materials, studio, etc. and it is not "lost art time". ~sometimes I ask them to pick up x number pieces of stuff to throw away or recycle and that's their ticket out!

                                    ....but while many of us see creativity at work, permission to experiment and unlimited possibilities, others see just plain mess....I recently had to close the movable wall between the art area and a common project area. As I am at a far end of the building I now feel even more isolated :-( One student put it well "how can we think outside the box if we're in the box"!!!

                                    But I know the amazing experiences kids are having in our space so I don't envy those other pristine rooms....I'll take my organized chaos any day!!
                                    creatively, Linda in Oregon


                                    "Greg Percy said
                                    Greetings-

                                    I have found it more difficult to motivate MS kids to clean than elementary. My
                                    room is not
                                    the cleanest anyway, but hey, it's the art room...Today for example, we are
                                    cutting
                                    styrofoam with 8th grade, doing plater sculptures with 7th and painting with 6th

                                    grade...It'll be messy, but fun...I don't know if I could share a room with
                                    anyone because
                                    I'd probably drive them nuts because I have a pretty high "threshold of
                                    cleanliness" as I
                                    like to call it...But I guess that's one of the reasons I teach art..

                                    Greg Percy
                                  • Catherine Sherwood
                                    Jen, I recommend The Passionate Teacher by Robert Fried. This book spoke to me. It s not art specific, but very applicable. Here s a quote from pg. 80
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Apr 8, 2006
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                                      Jen,

                                      I recommend The Passionate Teacher by Robert Fried. This book “spoke” to me. It’s not art specific, but very applicable. Here’s a quote from pg. 80 “…invite students to become an active part of the lesson and to use their experiences, opinions, and creativity to join you in examining the content.”  

                                      Catherine

                                       

                                      Jen Millward <jenmillward@...> wrote:

                                      Hello everyone

                                       

                                      “are there any books which you would recommend for the budding art teacher to read? “

                                    • Jessica
                                      Quoting Linda: I think students need to learn/know that part of their responsibility as an artist is to maintain the materials, studio, etc. and it is not
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Apr 9, 2006
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                                        Quoting Linda:
                                        "I think students need to learn/know that part of their responsibility as an artist is to
                                        maintain the materials, studio, etc. and it is not "lost art time"."

                                        I recently wrapped up my ceramics unit with a Cleaning Day in my 9th grade class. Every
                                        student had a job, and if they chose not to do it, they'd be sent to the SLC (detention). They
                                        all seemed fine with it, no complaints (even a few that looked excited), until my one vocal
                                        student asked, "Why can't the custodians do this, isn't it their job?" My response was that the
                                        custodians didn't make the mess, didn't get to work with the clay, and they do clean up at the
                                        end of the day after everyone, however it is our job as artists and students to clean up after
                                        ourselves.

                                        I'm sure other people have had students like this...what would your response be?

                                        Thanks!
                                        jessica
                                      • Patricia Jones Brigman
                                        Schools in Japan don t always have custodians. The students do the sweeping, mopping, dusting, polishing, etc., including serving lunch. They are MUCH more
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Apr 9, 2006
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                                          Schools in Japan don't always have custodians. The students do the
                                          sweeping, mopping, dusting, polishing, etc., including serving lunch. They
                                          are MUCH more aware of their messes throughout the day because of this. My
                                          kids learn this as part of our Japan study when we do origami. The whole
                                          idea of empathy (or lack thereof) towards others (including our custodial
                                          staff) is one of my pet peeves and the kids know better than to say "can't
                                          the custodian do it" in front of me. Another pet peeve,...when they say "I
                                          didn't drop that trash, why should I have to pick it up..." Argh-GRRR!!
                                          Watch out for Mrs. Brigman!! :)

                                          Patti



                                          Patti Brigman
                                          Art Teacher
                                          Walker Elementary


                                          -----Original Message-----
                                          From: "Jessica" <kermit_al@...>
                                          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Sun, 09 Apr 2006 14:21:33 -0000
                                          Subject: [art_education] Re: Clean Art Rooms

                                          > Quoting Linda:
                                          > "I think students need to learn/know that part of their responsibility
                                          > as an artist is to
                                          > maintain the materials, studio, etc. and it is not "lost art time"."
                                          >
                                          > I recently wrapped up my ceramics unit with a Cleaning Day in my 9th
                                          > grade class. Every
                                          > student had a job, and if they chose not to do it, they'd be sent to
                                          > the SLC (detention). They
                                          > all seemed fine with it, no complaints (even a few that looked
                                          > excited), until my one vocal
                                          > student asked, "Why can't the custodians do this, isn't it their job?"
                                          > My response was that the
                                          > custodians didn't make the mess, didn't get to work with the clay, and
                                          > they do clean up at the
                                          > end of the day after everyone, however it is our job as artists and
                                          > students to clean up after
                                          > ourselves.
                                          >
                                          > I'm sure other people have had students like this...what would your
                                          > response be?
                                          >
                                          > Thanks!
                                          > jessica
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                          >
                                          >
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                                        • Act Silly 4 Art
                                          I can t wait until this Wednesday,... it s my annual Spring Cleaning. Right before our school goes on Spring Break I make each of my art classes clean out
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Apr 10, 2006
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                                            I can't wait until this Wednesday,... it's my annual Spring Cleaning.  Right before our school goes on Spring Break I make each of my art classes clean out their art baskets, folders, then dust, wipe, sweep and mop my room.  I get one or two students who complain that I'm a slave driver or threaten to report me to the State for violating child labor laws.  But then I remind them that their parents signed an agreement at the beginning of the year releasing me from all liabilities and giving me permission to do what I please with them.  Of course, they don't believe me at first, so I pull out the Art Room Agreement that is signed by their parents and highlight the section that says that each child is responsible for cleaning up after him or herself, and helping to maintain a safe and clean environment for themselves and others.  Oh, and I also show them the part where I list all the cleaning products used in the classroom that their parents also initial.  Stops them cold every time.  Now if I took some of those little devils home and made them clean my house that would be violating child labor laws..  hahaha  or would it?  hmmmmm
                                             
                                            cat
                                             Jessica <kermit_al@...> wrote:
                                            Quoting Linda:
                                            "I think students need to learn/know that part of their responsibility as an artist is to
                                            maintain the materials, studio, etc. and it is not "lost art time"."

                                            I recently wrapped up my ceramics unit with a Cleaning Day in my 9th grade class.  Every
                                            student had a job, and if they chose not to do it, they'd be sent to the SLC (detention).  They
                                            all seemed fine with it, no complaints (even a few that looked excited), until my one vocal
                                            student asked, "Why can't the custodians do this, isn't it their job?"  My response was that the
                                            custodians didn't make the mess, didn't get to work with the clay, and they do clean up at the
                                            end of the day after everyone, however it is our job as artists and students to clean up after
                                            ourselves.

                                            I'm sure other people have had students like this...what would your response be?

                                            Thanks!
                                            jessica





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