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What is TAB Choice? Teaching for Artistic Behavior

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  • Judy Decker
    Greetings Art Educators, You hear me talking a lot about TAB Choice on the list. I would like to share Kathy Douglas response to What is TAB Choice? Folks,
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 2, 2006
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      Greetings Art Educators,

      You hear me talking a lot about TAB Choice on the list. I would like
      to share Kathy Douglas' response to "What is TAB Choice?" Folks, I
      have actually SEEN DBAE done the wrong way and "ruin" kids (ask me off
      list and I will tell you) I KNOW that TAB Choice is the way to go. You
      can take "baby steps" and keep some of your teacher directed lessons -
      then introduce Choice in others. I am not saying to throw out
      everything you do and change. I firmly believe you can merge DBAE with
      TAB Choice and come out a winner for you and your students.

      From Kathy Dougles ("Queen" of Choice -- smile).

      I began a choice based program in 1974 with the help and mentoring of a
      gifted painter, who was not an art education major. He went on to be
      head of painting at RISD a few years ago.

      TAB stands for "Teaching for Artistic Behavior"

      Choice-based teaching and learning delivers in-depth curriculum in the
      context of student-centered work. This is an art teaching concept which
      allows for curriculum to be presented in-depth within the context of
      work chosen by student artists. Given broad responsibilities and high
      standards, children are able to organize the reality of their lives and
      interests into vigorous images. Classrooms are arranged as studios, and
      the effective organization of space, time, and materials enables
      students to create work which is individual and compelling. The
      Teaching for Artistic Behavior Partnership (TAB) is a professional
      group supporting this nationally recognized, choice-based
      (studio/learning) centers approach to teaching art. Developed in
      Massachusetts classrooms over thirty years, and through courses and
      research at the Massachusetts College of Art, this concept allows
      students to experience the work of the artist through teaching which is
      responsive to their needs and interests. We are committed to supporting
      and encouraging teachers who would like to provide authentic art making
      opportunities for students in schools.

      <<How do I ensure that all my students learn
      the concepts that I wish to teach?>>

      The very first concept that choice based teachers want their students
      to learn is what artists do. As our honored colleague Pauline Joseph
      used to say "The job of the artist is to have an idea and then find
      the best material to express it. Or, to find a material that leads to
      an idea." We believe that this is the real work of the artist and our
      primary goal is to provide opportunities for students to do this real
      work. Instruction is provided each week, of techniques, materials, art
      history, etc. in brief whole group presentations. Students may then
      use that information immediately, or go to a center in the classroom to
      do the work of their choice. Everything in the centers has been
      introduced in these brief but thorough demonstrations. In a full
      fledged choice program students choose subject matter and medium each
      week.

      Classrooms are highly organized so that students know where to find and
      return all materials. Students are taught how to set up and care for
      their own materials. Responsibilities are clearly delineated and
      students are expected to be in charge of their learning. Students can
      be accountable to any grading system required in their school.

      Choice based teachers recognize the difference between what we teach
      and what students have learned. We believe that, as Peter London says
      "authentic learning is consensual and self-sustaining". All students
      choose to learn or not. I chose to forget every part of my high school
      chemistry experience as soon as I had passed the final. But we know
      what we teach and we can see what students know and do not know as we
      carefully observe them working independently.

      The TAB Partnership has an extensive web presence and is included in
      Craig Roland's new book THE ART TEACHERS' GUIDE TO THE INTERNET pp.
      80,81 (Davis Publications, 2005)

      We are the visual art content providers for the Department of Education
      funded http://knowledgeloom.org

      Our listserv is at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/

      Other sites and web logs include:

      http://tabnaea.blogspot.com/
      "Recent Art Work from TAB Classrooms at NAEA" This is a virtual tour of
      a national exhibition of work from 14 schools in 6 states at the
      Arnheim Gallery in Boston.

      http://sugarcreek.newpal.k12.in.us/choice3/index.htm
      "Choice-Based Art Education" This is a growing resource for
      choice-based art education by Clark Fralick and Staci Konesky.

      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/TAB-CHOICE.htm
      "Teaching for Artistic Behavior" Judy Decker (part of Incredible Art
      Department website)

      http://tabchoiceteaching.blogspot.com/
      "Teaching for Artistic Behavior" Katherine Douglas (elementary art,
      Massachusetts)

      http://clydegaw.blogspot.com/
      "Transition to Choice Based Art Education" Clyde Gaw (elementary art,
      Indiana)

      http://www.cfralick.blogspot.com/
      "The Wonderful World of Discovery" Clark Fralick (elementary art,
      Indiana)

      http://artatrms.blogspot.com/
      "Art at RMS" Nan Hathaway (gifted and talented school K-8, Colorado)

      http://choiceartroom.blogspot.com/
      "My Choice-Based Art Room Carolyn Kinniery (elementary art,
      Massachusetts)

      http://tabforspecialneeds.blogspot.com/
      "Choice Based Art for Students with Disabilities" Kathy Velon (Vermont)

      http://elmwoodart.blogspot.com/
      "Elmwood's Art Studio" Bonnie Muir (elementary art, Massachusetts)

      http://agoodthingintheartroom.blogspot.com/
      "A good thing happened in the art room today" Laurie Jakubiak
      (elementary art, Massachusetts)

      http://toktekart.blogspot.com/
      "TAB-choice Art at McAuliffe Elementary" Ann Gray (elementary art,
      Oklahoma)

      http://jackmanart.blogspot.com/
      "Art at Jackman" Heather Scott (elementary art, Ohio)

      http://thevirtualclassroom.blogspot.com/
      "The Virtual Classroom" Cynthia Gaub (middle school art, Washington
      State)

      http://parklanechoice.blogspot.com/
      "parklane choice" Deborah Gilbert (elementary art, Colorado)>>
    • katday2001
      If you can stand one more response to whether or not TAB will be the method for all future art teachers..... I am in my second year of teaching art and
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 5, 2006
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        If you can stand one more response to whether or not TAB will be the
        method for all future art teachers.....

        I am in my second year of teaching art and introduced Choice this
        year full force. I had "messed around" the year before, but found
        that getting all the materials out for all the classes was a huge
        undertaking. Over the summer, I set up my centers: made posters,
        organized supplies, had examples to inspire students. My experience
        has been a grand experiment that has occasionally gone right and
        often left me frustrated.

        TAB is for creative and organized teachers, which I thought I was. I
        introduce mini-lessons at the beginning and allow the students to
        make another choice, which most do (hence, my frustration!). Here is
        a short list of problems I've had:
        1. many students do the same things every week: glue wood scraps
        into skate parks, make greeting cards, and collages. Any new skill I
        would have, preivously, MADE them attempt, can easily be avoided.
        Any challenging or time-consuming project is rejected in favor of
        make-it-and-take-it art. Weaving is universally rejected as it takes
        too long or involves unfamiliar techniques.
        2. the unmotivated students from before (during DBAE) are still
        unmotivated. I don't know if they want to avoid work or just don't
        like art, any art, but I am still prodding the same people.
        3. I don't think my students are learning anything new. They're
        practicing the comfortable techniques (painting, play-doh cutting-up,
        and gluing)and avoiding the unfamiliar. I thought art was supposed
        to introduce the UNfamiliar and expand horizons. I feel like we've
        given up expanded horizons in favor of enhanced creativity (and
        shouldn't the two go hand-in-hand?)

        Certainly, forcing everyone to copy "Starry Night" is wrong. Yes,
        this method encourages self-direction and kids make things that have
        meaning for them instead of us. Yes, this IS how real artists work
        (but, uh, real artists have art training in technique before they go
        out into the world to create art....). I dont' care if my hallways
        display odd child-initiated creations that make adults wonder what
        we're learning in the art room. I DO mind that my kids dont' seem to
        be any further along in their art education what they were last
        fall. And I do mind that anything unfamiliar is rejected for the
        comfortable media.

        I teach K-12 art and find this method works best for the youngest
        kids and allows older kids to sit around and talk while they pretend
        to make art. I'm not sure it's a method for the new art teacher at
        all, but may be great for an experienced teacher who has her
        assessment methods and procedures down. BTW, Kathy Douglas ROCKS!
        And, it seems to work well for her. I just wanted to add
        my "caveat." I'm working and reworking how much choice to foster
        next year, how much written response to require to make the art more
        focussed. Maybe this time next year I'll have all the answers!
        Kathleen Day





        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Greetings Art Educators,
        >
        > You hear me talking a lot about TAB Choice on the list. I would like
        > to share Kathy Douglas' response to "What is TAB Choice?" Folks, I
        > have actually SEEN DBAE done the wrong way and "ruin" kids (ask me
        off
        > list and I will tell you) I KNOW that TAB Choice is the way to go.
        You
        > can take "baby steps" and keep some of your teacher directed
        lessons -
        > then introduce Choice in others. I am not saying to throw out
        > everything you do and change. I firmly believe you can merge DBAE
        with
        > TAB Choice and come out a winner for you and your students.
        >
        > From Kathy Dougles ("Queen" of Choice -- smile).
        >
        > I began a choice based program in 1974 with the help and mentoring
        of a
        > gifted painter, who was not an art education major. He went on to
        be
        > head of painting at RISD a few years ago.
        >
        > TAB stands for "Teaching for Artistic Behavior"
        >
        > Choice-based teaching and learning delivers in-depth curriculum in
        the
        > context of student-centered work. This is an art teaching concept
        which
        > allows for curriculum to be presented in-depth within the context of
        > work chosen by student artists. Given broad responsibilities and
        high
        > standards, children are able to organize the reality of their lives
        and
        > interests into vigorous images. Classrooms are arranged as studios,
        and
        > the effective organization of space, time, and materials enables
        > students to create work which is individual and compelling. The
        > Teaching for Artistic Behavior Partnership (TAB) is a professional
        > group supporting this nationally recognized, choice-based
        > (studio/learning) centers approach to teaching art. Developed in
        > Massachusetts classrooms over thirty years, and through courses and
        > research at the Massachusetts College of Art, this concept allows
        > students to experience the work of the artist through teaching
        which is
        > responsive to their needs and interests. We are committed to
        supporting
        > and encouraging teachers who would like to provide authentic art
        making
        > opportunities for students in schools.
        >
        > <<How do I ensure that all my students learn
        > the concepts that I wish to teach?>>
        >
        > The very first concept that choice based teachers want their
        students
        > to learn is what artists do. As our honored colleague Pauline Joseph
        > used to say "The job of the artist is to have an idea and then find
        > the best material to express it. Or, to find a material that leads
        to
        > an idea." We believe that this is the real work of the artist and
        our
        > primary goal is to provide opportunities for students to do this
        real
        > work. Instruction is provided each week, of techniques, materials,
        art
        > history, etc. in brief whole group presentations. Students may then
        > use that information immediately, or go to a center in the
        classroom to
        > do the work of their choice. Everything in the centers has been
        > introduced in these brief but thorough demonstrations. In a full
        > fledged choice program students choose subject matter and medium
        each
        > week.
        >
        > Classrooms are highly organized so that students know where to find
        and
        > return all materials. Students are taught how to set up and care
        for
        > their own materials. Responsibilities are clearly delineated and
        > students are expected to be in charge of their learning. Students
        can
        > be accountable to any grading system required in their school.
        >
        > Choice based teachers recognize the difference between what we teach
        > and what students have learned. We believe that, as Peter London
        says
        > "authentic learning is consensual and self-sustaining". All
        students
        > choose to learn or not. I chose to forget every part of my high
        school
        > chemistry experience as soon as I had passed the final. But we know
        > what we teach and we can see what students know and do not know as
        we
        > carefully observe them working independently.
        >
        > The TAB Partnership has an extensive web presence and is included in
        > Craig Roland's new book THE ART TEACHERS' GUIDE TO THE INTERNET pp.
        > 80,81 (Davis Publications, 2005)
        >
        > We are the visual art content providers for the Department of
        Education
        > funded http://knowledgeloom.org
        >
        > Our listserv is at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/
        >
        > Other sites and web logs include:
        >
        > http://tabnaea.blogspot.com/
        > "Recent Art Work from TAB Classrooms at NAEA" This is a virtual
        tour of
        > a national exhibition of work from 14 schools in 6 states at the
        > Arnheim Gallery in Boston.
        >
        > http://sugarcreek.newpal.k12.in.us/choice3/index.htm
        > "Choice-Based Art Education" This is a growing resource for
        > choice-based art education by Clark Fralick and Staci Konesky.
        >
        > http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/TAB-CHOICE.htm
        > "Teaching for Artistic Behavior" Judy Decker (part of Incredible Art
        > Department website)
        >
        > http://tabchoiceteaching.blogspot.com/
        > "Teaching for Artistic Behavior" Katherine Douglas (elementary art,
        > Massachusetts)
        >
        > http://clydegaw.blogspot.com/
        > "Transition to Choice Based Art Education" Clyde Gaw (elementary
        art,
        > Indiana)
        >
        > http://www.cfralick.blogspot.com/
        > "The Wonderful World of Discovery" Clark Fralick (elementary art,
        > Indiana)
        >
        > http://artatrms.blogspot.com/
        > "Art at RMS" Nan Hathaway (gifted and talented school K-8, Colorado)
        >
        > http://choiceartroom.blogspot.com/
        > "My Choice-Based Art Room Carolyn Kinniery (elementary art,
        > Massachusetts)
        >
        > http://tabforspecialneeds.blogspot.com/
        > "Choice Based Art for Students with Disabilities" Kathy Velon
        (Vermont)
        >
        > http://elmwoodart.blogspot.com/
        > "Elmwood's Art Studio" Bonnie Muir (elementary art, Massachusetts)
        >
        > http://agoodthingintheartroom.blogspot.com/
        > "A good thing happened in the art room today" Laurie Jakubiak
        > (elementary art, Massachusetts)
        >
        > http://toktekart.blogspot.com/
        > "TAB-choice Art at McAuliffe Elementary" Ann Gray (elementary art,
        > Oklahoma)
        >
        > http://jackmanart.blogspot.com/
        > "Art at Jackman" Heather Scott (elementary art, Ohio)
        >
        > http://thevirtualclassroom.blogspot.com/
        > "The Virtual Classroom" Cynthia Gaub (middle school art, Washington
        > State)
        >
        > http://parklanechoice.blogspot.com/
        > "parklane choice" Deborah Gilbert (elementary art, Colorado)>>
        >
      • Alissa Garcia
        I m glad to hear about potential problems with TAB....it will better prepare me for what I can expect. OK....I m thinking more on a middle school or high
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
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          I'm glad to hear about potential problems with TAB....it will better
          prepare me for what I can expect. OK....I'm thinking more on a
          middle school or high school level, but maybe if your students don't
          know what to do, you should introduce some kind of brainstorming
          activity. If they are not learning anything new, maybe have small
          assignments outside of their larger studio assignments, where they
          can practice all of the necessary techniques and elements that you
          feel. I think one thing about a Choice room to keep in mind would be
          that for those students who aren't motivated, that would be an
          opportunity for you to either find a way to motivate them, either
          with brainstorming and finding out what their interests are, or if
          that doesn't work, then you could give them a more structured
          assignment.
          I think there should be some kind of balance. Because there are some
          students who are completely creative and structure inhibits them too
          much, however there are some students who need structure. I think I
          would try to treat my TAB room like an IB class. Where my students
          should try new things, and journal what their experiences are.
          Because if they ever want to go to art school, they will need to
          show that they can do more than just paint portraits. And for those
          who need structure, then I am prepared to give them structure.

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "katday2001" <neato23@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > If you can stand one more response to whether or not TAB will be
          the
          > method for all future art teachers.....
          >
          > I am in my second year of teaching art and introduced Choice this
          > year full force. I had "messed around" the year before, but found
          > that getting all the materials out for all the classes was a huge
          > undertaking. Over the summer, I set up my centers: made posters,
          > organized supplies, had examples to inspire students. My
          experience
          > has been a grand experiment that has occasionally gone right and
          > often left me frustrated.
          >
          > TAB is for creative and organized teachers, which I thought I
          was. I
          > introduce mini-lessons at the beginning and allow the students to
          > make another choice, which most do (hence, my frustration!). Here
          is
          > a short list of problems I've had:
          > 1. many students do the same things every week: glue wood scraps
          > into skate parks, make greeting cards, and collages. Any new
          skill I
          > would have, preivously, MADE them attempt, can easily be avoided.
          > Any challenging or time-consuming project is rejected in favor of
          > make-it-and-take-it art. Weaving is universally rejected as it
          takes
          > too long or involves unfamiliar techniques.
          > 2. the unmotivated students from before (during DBAE) are still
          > unmotivated. I don't know if they want to avoid work or just
          don't
          > like art, any art, but I am still prodding the same people.
          > 3. I don't think my students are learning anything new. They're
          > practicing the comfortable techniques (painting, play-doh cutting-
          up,
          > and gluing)and avoiding the unfamiliar. I thought art was
          supposed
          > to introduce the UNfamiliar and expand horizons. I feel like
          we've
          > given up expanded horizons in favor of enhanced creativity (and
          > shouldn't the two go hand-in-hand?)
          >
          > Certainly, forcing everyone to copy "Starry Night" is wrong. Yes,
          > this method encourages self-direction and kids make things that
          have
          > meaning for them instead of us. Yes, this IS how real artists
          work
          > (but, uh, real artists have art training in technique before they
          go
          > out into the world to create art....). I dont' care if my hallways
          > display odd child-initiated creations that make adults wonder what
          > we're learning in the art room. I DO mind that my kids dont' seem
          to
          > be any further along in their art education what they were last
          > fall. And I do mind that anything unfamiliar is rejected for the
          > comfortable media.
          >
          > I teach K-12 art and find this method works best for the youngest
          > kids and allows older kids to sit around and talk while they
          pretend
          > to make art. I'm not sure it's a method for the new art teacher
          at
          > all, but may be great for an experienced teacher who has her
          > assessment methods and procedures down. BTW, Kathy Douglas ROCKS!
          > And, it seems to work well for her. I just wanted to add
          > my "caveat." I'm working and reworking how much choice to foster
          > next year, how much written response to require to make the art
          more
          > focussed. Maybe this time next year I'll have all the answers!
          > Kathleen Day
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Greetings Art Educators,
          > >
          > > You hear me talking a lot about TAB Choice on the list. I would
          like
          > > to share Kathy Douglas' response to "What is TAB Choice?" Folks,
          I
          > > have actually SEEN DBAE done the wrong way and "ruin" kids (ask
          me
          > off
          > > list and I will tell you) I KNOW that TAB Choice is the way to
          go.
          > You
          > > can take "baby steps" and keep some of your teacher directed
          > lessons -
          > > then introduce Choice in others. I am not saying to throw out
          > > everything you do and change. I firmly believe you can merge
          DBAE
          > with
          > > TAB Choice and come out a winner for you and your students.
          > >
          > > From Kathy Dougles ("Queen" of Choice -- smile).
          > >
          > > I began a choice based program in 1974 with the help and
          mentoring
          > of a
          > > gifted painter, who was not an art education major. He went on
          to
          > be
          > > head of painting at RISD a few years ago.
          > >
          > > TAB stands for "Teaching for Artistic Behavior"
          > >
          > > Choice-based teaching and learning delivers in-depth curriculum
          in
          > the
          > > context of student-centered work. This is an art teaching
          concept
          > which
          > > allows for curriculum to be presented in-depth within the
          context of
          > > work chosen by student artists. Given broad responsibilities and
          > high
          > > standards, children are able to organize the reality of their
          lives
          > and
          > > interests into vigorous images. Classrooms are arranged as
          studios,
          > and
          > > the effective organization of space, time, and materials enables
          > > students to create work which is individual and compelling. The
          > > Teaching for Artistic Behavior Partnership (TAB) is a
          professional
          > > group supporting this nationally recognized, choice-based
          > > (studio/learning) centers approach to teaching art. Developed in
          > > Massachusetts classrooms over thirty years, and through courses
          and
          > > research at the Massachusetts College of Art, this concept allows
          > > students to experience the work of the artist through teaching
          > which is
          > > responsive to their needs and interests. We are committed to
          > supporting
          > > and encouraging teachers who would like to provide authentic art
          > making
          > > opportunities for students in schools.
          > >
          > > <<How do I ensure that all my students learn
          > > the concepts that I wish to teach?>>
          > >
          > > The very first concept that choice based teachers want their
          > students
          > > to learn is what artists do. As our honored colleague Pauline
          Joseph
          > > used to say "The job of the artist is to have an idea and then
          find
          > > the best material to express it. Or, to find a material that
          leads
          > to
          > > an idea." We believe that this is the real work of the artist
          and
          > our
          > > primary goal is to provide opportunities for students to do this
          > real
          > > work. Instruction is provided each week, of techniques,
          materials,
          > art
          > > history, etc. in brief whole group presentations. Students may
          then
          > > use that information immediately, or go to a center in the
          > classroom to
          > > do the work of their choice. Everything in the centers has been
          > > introduced in these brief but thorough demonstrations. In a full
          > > fledged choice program students choose subject matter and medium
          > each
          > > week.
          > >
          > > Classrooms are highly organized so that students know where to
          find
          > and
          > > return all materials. Students are taught how to set up and
          care
          > for
          > > their own materials. Responsibilities are clearly delineated and
          > > students are expected to be in charge of their learning.
          Students
          > can
          > > be accountable to any grading system required in their school.
          > >
          > > Choice based teachers recognize the difference between what we
          teach
          > > and what students have learned. We believe that, as Peter
          London
          > says
          > > "authentic learning is consensual and self-sustaining". All
          > students
          > > choose to learn or not. I chose to forget every part of my high
          > school
          > > chemistry experience as soon as I had passed the final. But we
          know
          > > what we teach and we can see what students know and do not know
          as
          > we
          > > carefully observe them working independently.
          > >
          > > The TAB Partnership has an extensive web presence and is
          included in
          > > Craig Roland's new book THE ART TEACHERS' GUIDE TO THE INTERNET
          pp.
          > > 80,81 (Davis Publications, 2005)
          > >
          > > We are the visual art content providers for the Department of
          > Education
          > > funded http://knowledgeloom.org
          > >
          > > Our listserv is at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/
          > >
          > > Other sites and web logs include:
          > >
          > > http://tabnaea.blogspot.com/
          > > "Recent Art Work from TAB Classrooms at NAEA" This is a virtual
          > tour of
          > > a national exhibition of work from 14 schools in 6 states at the
          > > Arnheim Gallery in Boston.
          > >
          > > http://sugarcreek.newpal.k12.in.us/choice3/index.htm
          > > "Choice-Based Art Education" This is a growing resource for
          > > choice-based art education by Clark Fralick and Staci Konesky.
          > >
          > > http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/TAB-
          CHOICE.htm
          > > "Teaching for Artistic Behavior" Judy Decker (part of Incredible
          Art
          > > Department website)
          > >
          > > http://tabchoiceteaching.blogspot.com/
          > > "Teaching for Artistic Behavior" Katherine Douglas (elementary
          art,
          > > Massachusetts)
          > >
          > > http://clydegaw.blogspot.com/
          > > "Transition to Choice Based Art Education" Clyde Gaw (elementary
          > art,
          > > Indiana)
          > >
          > > http://www.cfralick.blogspot.com/
          > > "The Wonderful World of Discovery" Clark Fralick (elementary art,
          > > Indiana)
          > >
          > > http://artatrms.blogspot.com/
          > > "Art at RMS" Nan Hathaway (gifted and talented school K-8,
          Colorado)
          > >
          > > http://choiceartroom.blogspot.com/
          > > "My Choice-Based Art Room Carolyn Kinniery (elementary art,
          > > Massachusetts)
          > >
          > > http://tabforspecialneeds.blogspot.com/
          > > "Choice Based Art for Students with Disabilities" Kathy Velon
          > (Vermont)
          > >
          > > http://elmwoodart.blogspot.com/
          > > "Elmwood's Art Studio" Bonnie Muir (elementary art,
          Massachusetts)
          > >
          > > http://agoodthingintheartroom.blogspot.com/
          > > "A good thing happened in the art room today" Laurie Jakubiak
          > > (elementary art, Massachusetts)
          > >
          > > http://toktekart.blogspot.com/
          > > "TAB-choice Art at McAuliffe Elementary" Ann Gray (elementary
          art,
          > > Oklahoma)
          > >
          > > http://jackmanart.blogspot.com/
          > > "Art at Jackman" Heather Scott (elementary art, Ohio)
          > >
          > > http://thevirtualclassroom.blogspot.com/
          > > "The Virtual Classroom" Cynthia Gaub (middle school art,
          Washington
          > > State)
          > >
          > > http://parklanechoice.blogspot.com/
          > > "parklane choice" Deborah Gilbert (elementary art, Colorado)>>
          > >
          >
        • Kristina Rost
          I have also been following this thread with huge interest. I am in my 8 th week EVER of teaching a HS art program. I have my Art Ed degree , dusty, circa 1980
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            I have also been following this thread with huge interest. I am in my 8'th
            week EVER of teaching a HS art program. I have my Art Ed degree , dusty,
            circa 1980 and 25 years as a graphic designer and artist in residence in my
            own house : ) and few stints in the community...

            I will be 50 next month!!!
            "...may you stay forever young" - Dylan?

            he lied.

            My biggest problem has been I introduce too many projects and have many
            things going at once...lots of projects, lots of paperwork...that rubric
            thing is time consuming to grade...and posting on the school RenWeb site.

            So in a way I have been "intuitively" doing TAB...only with my own bag of
            projects I know as a "working artist"

            We started out as a group but with my ah hem lack of deadlines, some finish
            early and some finish late... The early ones I get going on something else,
            their neighbor see it and says I want to that...

            We did value study with pencil
            then a pencil still life with shells& bones- IAD

            typography designs

            Drawing on the rightside of the brain thru to the chapter on edges.

            doodle (Drawing with Children loosing up exercise), disastrous with the left
            brainers...but the best doodle won first prize at the regional HS art show
            and I got to utter the most desired words.. "I told you so." They thought
            it funny how I crowed.

            We did human face studies from a Christopher Hart how to book and then did
            self portraits from digital photos.

            Color Wheels with tempera from IAD
            next I want to extend this to do loose minature watercolors

            Calligraphy
            Manga/Anime
            Jim Dine hearts- IAD
            Ceramics : pinch, coil and throwing...we did our first firing...and
            we made whistles...cool project and reasonably short term.

            last week I introduced Altered books...HUGE success!

            I will continue this with collage, in my second 9 weeks I am planning
            now...some of you I have contacted off list and slobbered at your feet for
            lesson plans I have heard you talk about and I am game to try.

            This is the nIntendo culture...I love one day 83min block schedule
            projects...I want to give these kids as much as I can to show them that
            they are talented and how they can slow down and develop art projects on
            their own.
            isn't that teaching artistic behaviour?

            I plan to introduce perspective...I wish I had a good book on it.

            I have promised nature drawing/journaling when the weather turns nice...if
            ever.

            I have 3 kids who have been thru a dreamweaver tutorial and I hope to get my
            equipment debugged so we can produce a website or two as links for the
            school website.

            we sketch every class making our own hand sewn folios for sketchbooks
            which soon need to be bound. 2 15 min required...

            One thing you will notice is I lack the Art History tie in....I have trouble
            with the art history connection as I only have an overhead for demonstrating
            ...no budget for prints and the school does not have a color printer to
            print pieces from... If you have any slides I would slobber at your
            cyberfeet if you'd send them to me...or sell em cheap

            What I have going for me is I am moving after the semester so I can do as I
            want, and its a private conservative Christian school and they think I am a
            kooky creature anyway and no one really knows a thing about art. If I had to
            I could defend our project according to national standards...well maybe not
            the art history part.

            What I want is to understand the book "Art for Life" enough to
            internalize it.

            Anyone want to to a book study?
            any ideas?
            any free slides?
            more great MS or HS one day projects?

            Kristina
          • Alissa Garcia
            When I taught my 6th grade art class at a Catholic School, I only had an overhead projector also. SOOOO....I download some art images from the internet, then I
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              When I taught my 6th grade art class at a Catholic School, I only
              had an overhead projector also. SOOOO....I download some art images
              from the internet, then I inserted them on a word document,
              stretched them out a bit, then saved it and took it to a copy place
              and they printed them out on transparencies for me. The quality is
              not great, but you can still make out the image. I developed an Art
              Jeopardy game that the kids loved. It gets them to REALLY look at a
              painting, analyze it, listen to each others answers and also see if
              they can clarify an existing answer to receive points. Lemme know if
              you want me to send you some info on it. It's a fun way to do an art
              criticism with it. The kids get really into it. It might be
              something you could do once every two weeks, and get everyone
              involved. I tried to pick pieces of art that had a theme that the
              students had to figure out....not just a still life. The last one I
              did was "Black Manhattan" by Romare Bearden. I also offered a prize
              to the winning team, which they loved. Prizes usually are art
              related...colored pencils...etc. So, that's a fun way to involve art
              history, art criticism into your class.

              Alissa
              www.thecoolartteacher.com


              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kristina Rost <mhamster@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I have also been following this thread with huge interest. I am in
              my 8'th
              > week EVER of teaching a HS art program. I have my Art Ed degree ,
              dusty,
              > circa 1980 and 25 years as a graphic designer and artist in
              residence in my
              > own house : ) and few stints in the community...
              >
              > I will be 50 next month!!!
              > "...may you stay forever young" - Dylan?
              >
              > he lied.
              >
              > My biggest problem has been I introduce too many projects and have
              many
              > things going at once...lots of projects, lots of paperwork...that
              rubric
              > thing is time consuming to grade...and posting on the school
              RenWeb site.
              >
              > So in a way I have been "intuitively" doing TAB...only with my own
              bag of
              > projects I know as a "working artist"
              >
              > We started out as a group but with my ah hem lack of deadlines,
              some finish
              > early and some finish late... The early ones I get going on
              something else,
              > their neighbor see it and says I want to that...
              >
              > We did value study with pencil
              > then a pencil still life with shells& bones- IAD
              >
              > typography designs
              >
              > Drawing on the rightside of the brain thru to the chapter on edges.
              >
              > doodle (Drawing with Children loosing up exercise), disastrous
              with the left
              > brainers...but the best doodle won first prize at the regional HS
              art show
              > and I got to utter the most desired words.. "I told you so."
              They thought
              > it funny how I crowed.
              >
              > We did human face studies from a Christopher Hart how to book and
              then did
              > self portraits from digital photos.
              >
              > Color Wheels with tempera from IAD
              > next I want to extend this to do loose minature watercolors
              >
              > Calligraphy
              > Manga/Anime
              > Jim Dine hearts- IAD
              > Ceramics : pinch, coil and throwing...we did our first firing...and
              > we made whistles...cool project and reasonably short term.
              >
              > last week I introduced Altered books...HUGE success!
              >
              > I will continue this with collage, in my second 9 weeks I am
              planning
              > now...some of you I have contacted off list and slobbered at your
              feet for
              > lesson plans I have heard you talk about and I am game to try.
              >
              > This is the nIntendo culture...I love one day 83min block schedule
              > projects...I want to give these kids as much as I can to show them
              that
              > they are talented and how they can slow down and develop art
              projects on
              > their own.
              > isn't that teaching artistic behaviour?
              >
              > I plan to introduce perspective...I wish I had a good book on it.
              >
              > I have promised nature drawing/journaling when the weather turns
              nice...if
              > ever.
              >
              > I have 3 kids who have been thru a dreamweaver tutorial and I hope
              to get my
              > equipment debugged so we can produce a website or two as links
              for the
              > school website.
              >
              > we sketch every class making our own hand sewn folios for
              sketchbooks
              > which soon need to be bound. 2 15 min required...
              >
              > One thing you will notice is I lack the Art History tie in....I
              have trouble
              > with the art history connection as I only have an overhead for
              demonstrating
              > ...no budget for prints and the school does not have a color
              printer to
              > print pieces from... If you have any slides I would slobber at
              your
              > cyberfeet if you'd send them to me...or sell em cheap
              >
              > What I have going for me is I am moving after the semester so I
              can do as I
              > want, and its a private conservative Christian school and they
              think I am a
              > kooky creature anyway and no one really knows a thing about art.
              If I had to
              > I could defend our project according to national standards...well
              maybe not
              > the art history part.
              >
              > What I want is to understand the book "Art for Life" enough to
              > internalize it.
              >
              > Anyone want to to a book study?
              > any ideas?
              > any free slides?
              > more great MS or HS one day projects?
              >
              > Kristina
              >
            • Kristina Rost
              ... In color of course? Kinko? Ink jets do not work do they? It needs to be a laser right? ... Absolutely! Fun game, learning and plug the holes in my lesson
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                on 3/6/06 2:54 PM, Alissa Garcia at alissadg@... wrote:

                > art images from the internet, then I inserted them on a word document,
                > stretched them out a bit, then saved it and took it to a copy place and they
                > printed them out on transparencies for me.

                In color of course? Kinko? Ink jets do not work do they? It needs to be a
                laser right?

                > Art Jeopardy game that the kids loved....Lemme know if you want me to
                > send you some info on it.
                >
                Absolutely! Fun game, learning and plug the holes in my lesson plans? What
                a winner!!

                thanks Alissa



                Kristina
              • Catherine Sherwood
                You can use Apollo Inkjet Transparency film, they sell it at Office Max. And make your own transparencies. You may want to research price to have Kinkos do it
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  You can use Apollo Inkjet Transparency film, they sell it at Office Max. And
                  make your own transparencies. You may want to research price to have Kinkos
                  do it v the cost of ink. I don't know..



                  Also, what about hooking up your computer to your TV via s-video and showing
                  PPTs on the TV? (you have to have a fairly new model with s-video
                  capabilities, but I've seen it done in a middle school classroom.



                  Or what about just bringing in an extra large monitor and showing images of
                  art works that you've snagged from the net? You can find used monitors
                  fairly cheaply at Goodwill or???

                  I have the same problem--showing an image in an open book just doesn't do
                  the trick, while you're showing kids on one side of the room the other side
                  of the room is "gone".

                  Catherine

                  _____

                  From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com]
                  On Behalf Of Kristina Rost
                  Sent: Monday, March 06, 2006 3:23 PM
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: TAB wannabe from a newbie



                  on 3/6/06 2:54 PM, Alissa Garcia at alissadg@... wrote:

                  > art images from the internet, then I inserted them on a word document,
                  > stretched them out a bit, then saved it and took it to a copy place and
                  they
                  > printed them out on transparencies for me.

                  In color of course? Kinko? Ink jets do not work do they? It needs to be a
                  laser right?

                  > Art Jeopardy game that the kids loved....Lemme know if you want me to
                  > send you some info on it.
                  >
                  Absolutely! Fun game, learning and plug the holes in my lesson plans? What
                  a winner!!

                  thanks Alissa



                  Kristina





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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Catherine Sherwood
                  I too would like to hear from the experts the answers to your challenges. If you post on the TAB list I bet someone will have some great suggestions. Lack of
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I too would like to hear from the experts the answers to your challenges. If
                    you post on the TAB list I bet someone will have some great suggestions.

                    Lack of intrinsic motivation is rampant, and I think our high stakes
                    testing/teacher fed/spit back factoids mentality only contributes to the
                    attitude of doing just what is the minimum to get by. There have to be ways
                    to turn that around in the art room!



                    "introduce mini-lessons at the beginning and allow the students to
                    make another choice, which most do (hence, my frustration!).



                    How about requiring the play/care form that is described by (is it John
                    Crowe?) I read it somewhere and if you can't find it described let me know.
                    I must have a bookmark) They have to turn in a certain number of samples
                    (better yet build a portfolio) that shows they have tried out the new
                    technique or material? Make them accountable for something but allow a wide
                    range of media. You have to convince them that they won't know they like
                    something unless they try it more than just once.



                    "many students do the same things every week: glue wood scraps
                    into skate parks, make greeting cards, and collages. Any new skill I
                    would have, previously, MADE them attempt, can easily be avoided."



                    How about some kind of chart or sign-in that they do each meeting and figure
                    out what is appropriate in terms of time spent in the same center/media
                    unless they have cleared it with you. That way if someone is spending all
                    their time on collage you can work with them to develop a collage into a
                    completed work. Writing artist statements is a way to keep them thinking
                    "art" and may cut down on those dreaded "skate parks" (I've seen them too--
                    aarrgggh)



                    "I don't think my students are learning anything new. They're
                    practicing the comfortable techniques (painting, play-doh cutting-up,
                    and gluing)and avoiding the unfamiliar"



                    Don't we all do that? I do. Sometimes I have to really force myself to take
                    risks with materials. Again I think the play/care thing will help. Tell them
                    they have to try something they have never done before and the product won't
                    be graded; just that they must make an attempt. I just participated in a
                    wonderful color challenge on one of the AB lists. We chose 4 numbers, and
                    then used those numbers to choose a color pallet from a list of colors. I
                    could see doing something similar with a class. Let me know if you want that
                    list I think I saved it somewhere. I think it could be a great way to get
                    them to research colors and names. My list was sage green, yellow ochre,
                    magenta and burnt umber. I had fun with it, some lists were really strange
                    sounding. What is puce? And aubergene" and what's the difference between
                    lemon yellow and.. I digress. Paint chips from the store could help.



                    "I feel like we've
                    given up expanded horizons in favor of enhanced creativity (and
                    shouldn't the two go hand-in-hand?"



                    YES! I think so! Have you read the Marvin Bartel site?. There are many great
                    ways to help stuck artists generate ideas. Haven't you ever been stuck?
                    Maybe they just need gentle nudging? Try the "Conversation Game",
                    http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/self.html

                    I used it last year and it was very dynamic. Also, have you read the George
                    Szekely "Encouraging Creativity in Art Lessons"? many gems in that one
                    although geared mostly to elementary level.



                    Look here for some help too!

                    http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/Files/ideas.htm



                    You have a huge age spread to deal with, I don't know if I could do that. In
                    addition, I think you are right about the little ones, they still have that
                    childlike curiosity that keeps them seeking and makes TAB natural for them.
                    Your challenge is to figure out how to help those "too cool, too scared of
                    looking stupid in front of their peers" older kids to regain some of that
                    old enthusiasm. Could you figure out a way to pair up some middle and high
                    school kids with the younger ones. Perhaps under the guise of "teaching" the
                    young student a skill, some good could happen for both?



                    I'm just brainstorming here, and waiting for someone more experienced to pop
                    in..



                    Catherine









                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Alissa Garcia
                    Laser copies work best. Kinkos can do it for you...I go to a smaller place which is cheaper. Also, you can find my art jeopardy game on my website under the
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Laser copies work best. Kinkos can do it for you...I go to a smaller
                      place which is cheaper.

                      Also, you can find my art jeopardy game on my website under the
                      "lessons" page.
                      www.thecoolartteacher.com

                      I sent Judy the word document of the rules, and she will be posting it
                      here somewhere.

                      But you have to make a jeopardy board. Hopefully Alex Trebec will not
                      be beating down my door and force me to change the name of my game.
                      (smile)

                      -Alissa

                      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kristina Rost <mhamster@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > on 3/6/06 2:54 PM, Alissa Garcia at alissadg@... wrote:
                      >
                      > > art images from the internet, then I inserted them on a word document,
                      > > stretched them out a bit, then saved it and took it to a copy
                      place and they
                      > > printed them out on transparencies for me.
                      >
                      > In color of course? Kinko? Ink jets do not work do they? It needs
                      to be a
                      > laser right?
                      >
                      > > Art Jeopardy game that the kids loved....Lemme know if you want me to
                      > > send you some info on it.
                      > >
                      > Absolutely! Fun game, learning and plug the holes in my lesson
                      plans? What
                      > a winner!!
                      >
                      > thanks Alissa
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Kristina
                      >
                    • dkj
                      I don t think it quite fair to assume that the activities/strategies you list here haven t been tried in one way or another. When you factor in all of the
                      Message 10 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I don't think it quite fair to assume that the activities/strategies you list here haven't been tried in one way or another. When you factor in all of the elements of a Choice classroom that are interlaced and continually impacting each other, in addition to the ages, group dynamics, etc. of the students involved, etc., it becomes more complicated than when one is working things out theoretically. More information, as you mentioned, about great and not-so-great experiences can only be a helpful thing to a new teacher.

                        Deborah

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Alissa Garcia
                        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, March 06, 2006 11:23 AM
                        Subject: [Norton AntiSpam] [art_education] Re: What is TAB Choice? Teaching for Artistic Behavior


                        I'm glad to hear about potential problems with TAB....it will better
                        prepare me for what I can expect. OK....I'm thinking more on a
                        middle school or high school level, but maybe if your students don't
                        know what to do, you should introduce some kind of brainstorming
                        activity. If they are not learning anything new, maybe have small
                        assignments outside of their larger studio assignments, where they
                        can practice all of the necessary techniques and elements that you
                        feel. I think one thing about a Choice room to keep in mind would be
                        that for those students who aren't motivated, that would be an
                        opportunity for you to either find a way to motivate them, either
                        with brainstorming and finding out what their interests are, or if
                        that doesn't work, then you could give them a more structured
                        assignment.
                        I think there should be some kind of balance. Because there are some
                        students who are completely creative and structure inhibits them too
                        much, however there are some students who need structure. I think I
                        would try to treat my TAB room like an IB class. Where my students
                        should try new things, and journal what their experiences are.
                        Because if they ever want to go to art school, they will need to
                        show that they can do more than just paint portraits. And for those
                        who need structure, then I am prepared to give them structure.

                        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "katday2001" <neato23@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > If you can stand one more response to whether or not TAB will be
                        the
                        > method for all future art teachers.....



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Kristina Rost
                        on 3/6/06 10:19 PM, Alissa Garcia at alissadg@yahoo.com wrote: Thank you for your sharing and smart game...call me if Alex shows up and i will scare him with
                        Message 11 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          on 3/6/06 10:19 PM, Alissa Garcia at alissadg@... wrote:

                          Thank you for your sharing and smart game...call me if Alex shows up and i
                          will scare him with my xacto knife.

                          > Also, you can find my art jeopardy game on my website under the
                          > "lessons" page.
                          > www.thecoolartteacher.com
                          >
                          > I sent Judy the word document of the rules, and she will be posting it
                          > here somewhere.
                          >
                          > But you have to make a jeopardy board. Hopefully Alex Trebec will not
                          > be beating down my door and force me to change the name of my game.
                          > (smile)
                        • Alissa Garcia
                          I have had a couple of inquiries as to the kinds of questions that I have on my board....these are geared toward high school students, but you can rephrase
                          Message 12 of 12 , Mar 7, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I have had a couple of inquiries as to the kinds of questions that I
                            have on my board....these are geared toward high school students, but
                            you can rephrase them to suit your grade level.

                            Description questions:
                            Are the shapes organic or geometric?
                            Where do you see different values of one color?
                            Is the texture actual or implied?
                            Are the colors used warm or cool colors?

                            Formal analysis
                            How does the artist bring together all the parts of the composition?
                            Where is the central point of interest?
                            Is the balance symmetrical, asymmetrical, or radial?
                            Where do you see repetition of lines, shapes, patterns or colors?

                            Interpretation
                            What is the mood of this piece?
                            What is the setting and time?
                            What is the theme? or what is the artist trying to say?
                            Identify any areas of symbolism

                            Evaluation
                            How could you make a piece like this? Identify the process.
                            What qualities makes this piece important?
                            Where would you recommend this piece to be placed?
                            Check out the attachment for the rules of the game.
                            How does this compare to other pieces that you've seen with a similar
                            composition?

                            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kristina Rost <mhamster@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > on 3/6/06 10:19 PM, Alissa Garcia at alissadg@... wrote:
                            >
                            > Thank you for your sharing and smart game...call me if Alex shows up
                            and i
                            > will scare him with my xacto knife.
                            >
                            > > Also, you can find my art jeopardy game on my website under the
                            > > "lessons" page.
                            > > www.thecoolartteacher.com
                            > >
                            > > I sent Judy the word document of the rules, and she will be posting it
                            > > here somewhere.
                            > >
                            > > But you have to make a jeopardy board. Hopefully Alex Trebec will not
                            > > be beating down my door and force me to change the name of my game.
                            > > (smile)
                            >
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