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RE: [art_education] Intro and elementary ceramics

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  • Gray, Ann
    I teach 1st thru 5th to 600 students, 40 at a time because I see them every 3 days. Even with that many students, I have found that transformed pinch pots
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 3, 2005
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      I teach 1st thru 5th to 600 students, 40 at a time because I see them every 3 days. Even with that many students, I have found that transformed pinch pots turned into animals work very well. I compare these to ancient civilizations who used similar pots for the burial of ashes and the relics of saints. I have used this with 2nd thru 4th, and of course taught the additive method of attaching clay for the body parts. Coil pots have always worked for me for 5th, but we start with a pinch pot as the base. I found that they were just not up to coiling the bases and having them stay together. I start out with pinch pots in first to lead up to the other years. We have used coil pots, scratched on the outside for texture, as birds nests, and made simple birds to put in them in 2nd, also. On the pots, if the legs are attached underneath rather than along the edges of the pot, they have to be short and fat.

      I'm not sure that this makes sense, but it's 11:00 PM here, and I'm a little groggy. Good luck.

      Ann

      ________________________________

      From: art_education@yahoogroups.com on behalf of mikellee31
      Sent: Thu 11/3/2005 10:24 PM
      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [art_education] Intro and elementary ceramics



      Hi everyone, I am not new to the list, but I do not know if I have ever formally introduced
      myself. I have been a secondary art teacher for the past 7 years and this year I have
      switched to teaching 1st-5th elementary. I have about 540 students. I see them once a
      week for 1 hour for a total of 25 classes! I was a candidate for National Board Cert. but
      after changing levels I decided that I am pretty much a first year teacher and I needed to
      put that on hold, so I withdrew....

      I have had a lot of trouble with all sorts of things, but right now it is ceramics. I have
      always taught by teaching the vocab, the rules, and the techniques and then allowing
      studio after some planning on the part of the students. Today was my first day trying clay
      with the kids and I tried coil with some classes and pinch pots with some....they all looked
      horrible!! Not in the kids cool type of horrible, but in the completely not getting it at all
      type of horrible!

      I noticed that at the beginning of the year the kids were asking me to make specific thing
      out of clay - like 4th grade wanted to make "turtles" because that is what the previous
      teacher did with 4th grade....and 5th grade wanted to make food. I just don't quite know
      what is the best way to approach teaching this age and I am not feeling too good about
      saying " we are all making dogs" or something like that- However they don't seem to be
      responding too well to open ended assignments. Any advice on how to structure? It seems
      like I am stuck between process and product and lack of time to have enough process to
      develop a product- ha ha! - Any help on or off topic on or off list is welcome.







      Yahoo! Groups Links







      This email has been inspected by an Anti-SPAM server at Union Public Schools.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Hillmer, Jan
      Hi, Hi, Try to simplify, simplify. Go for simple slab projects; very simple pots, etc. Try to limit the subject matter somewhat. Like instead of turtles,
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 4, 2005
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        Hi,

        Hi,

        Try to simplify, simplify. Go for simple slab projects; very simple
        pots, etc. Try to limit the subject matter somewhat. Like instead of
        turtles, try sea life or animals... Some variety, but also some
        direction. Plan the project so that you focus on just one or two
        things for each - vocabulary, techniques and subject. Plan carefully,
        too, about building on your students' previous year's learning. Until
        the students get used to you and have you for a few years of skill
        building, it may be a bit of a struggle.

        I certainly don't claim to know lots about ceramics, but having taught
        both HS and elementary students, you do have to simplify the amount of
        info you include in the lessons, especially till they get used to your
        teaching style.

        If you'd like, email me off list and we can share more. I am sure there
        are things that you're doing with your students that are good, good,
        good!

        Jan

        -----Original Message-----
        From: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mikellee31
        Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2005 11:24 PM
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [art_education] Intro and elementary ceramics

        Hi everyone, I am not new to the list, but I do not know if I have ever
        formally introduced
        myself. I have been a secondary art teacher for the past 7 years and
        this year I have
        switched to teaching 1st-5th elementary. I have about 540 students. I
        see them once a
        week for 1 hour for a total of 25 classes! I was a candidate for
        National Board Cert. but
        after changing levels I decided that I am pretty much a first year
        teacher and I needed to
        put that on hold, so I withdrew....

        I have had a lot of trouble with all sorts of things, but right now it
        is ceramics. I have
        always taught by teaching the vocab, the rules, and the techniques and
        then allowing
        studio after some planning on the part of the students. Today was my
        first day trying clay
        with the kids and I tried coil with some classes and pinch pots with
        some....they all looked
        horrible!! Not in the kids cool type of horrible, but in the completely
        not getting it at all
        type of horrible!

        I noticed that at the beginning of the year the kids were asking me to
        make specific thing
        out of clay - like 4th grade wanted to make "turtles" because that is
        what the previous
        teacher did with 4th grade....and 5th grade wanted to make food. I just
        don't quite know
        what is the best way to approach teaching this age and I am not feeling
        too good about
        saying " we are all making dogs" or something like that- However they
        don't seem to be
        responding too well to open ended assignments. Any advice on how to
        structure? It seems
        like I am stuck between process and product and lack of time to have
        enough process to
        develop a product- ha ha! - Any help on or off topic on or off list is
        welcome.







        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • kelly taylor
        Hello, Ceramics is tough at the elementary level. One lesson that works really well for me is the pinch pots the with younger grades but it has to be a step by
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 4, 2005
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          Hello,
          Ceramics is tough at the elementary level.
          One lesson that works really well for me is the pinch
          pots the with younger grades but it has to be a step
          by step process with them. You can't show them all
          the steps at once, and then tell them to do it. I
          start by showing them how to wedge the class and then
          let them do it. I will say ok now you wedge it 5
          times. Do then they do that. Once they have done
          that I teach them to roll it into a ball, then they
          roll it into a ball. Then once they are finished i
          tell them to hold the ball in the palm of their hands
          and place their thumbs on top and then push their
          thumbs into the clay to create a hole in the middle of
          the ball. Once they have done that, i them teach them
          to pinch it out. And then we decorate it.
          Each step I show them and then they do it. I break it
          into as small as steps a possible for them. I am not
          a cookie cutter art teacher so this kills me to teach
          like this but for ceramics in works the best. They
          all end up looking different so that makes me feel
          better.
          Good luck
          Kelly

          --- mikellee31 <mikellee31@...> wrote:

          > Hi everyone, I am not new to the list, but I do not
          > know if I have ever formally introduced
          > myself. I have been a secondary art teacher for the
          > past 7 years and this year I have
          > switched to teaching 1st-5th elementary. I have
          > about 540 students. I see them once a
          > week for 1 hour for a total of 25 classes! I was a
          > candidate for National Board Cert. but
          > after changing levels I decided that I am pretty
          > much a first year teacher and I needed to
          > put that on hold, so I withdrew....
          >
          > I have had a lot of trouble with all sorts of
          > things, but right now it is ceramics. I have
          > always taught by teaching the vocab, the rules, and
          > the techniques and then allowing
          > studio after some planning on the part of the
          > students. Today was my first day trying clay
          > with the kids and I tried coil with some classes and
          > pinch pots with some....they all looked
          > horrible!! Not in the kids cool type of horrible,
          > but in the completely not getting it at all
          > type of horrible!
          >
          > I noticed that at the beginning of the year the kids
          > were asking me to make specific thing
          > out of clay - like 4th grade wanted to make
          > "turtles" because that is what the previous
          > teacher did with 4th grade....and 5th grade wanted
          > to make food. I just don't quite know
          > what is the best way to approach teaching this age
          > and I am not feeling too good about
          > saying " we are all making dogs" or something like
          > that- However they don't seem to be
          > responding too well to open ended assignments. Any
          > advice on how to structure? It seems
          > like I am stuck between process and product and lack
          > of time to have enough process to
          > develop a product- ha ha! - Any help on or off topic
          > on or off list is welcome.
          >
          >
          >
          >





          __________________________________
          Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
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        • Mikel Lee
          Thank you to everyone who replied to my post! I got some really great ideas. For one I learned that I was not breaking the pinching of the pots into simple
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 5, 2005
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            Thank you to everyone who replied to my post! I got
            some really great ideas. For one I learned that I was
            not breaking the pinching of the pots into simple
            enough steps- I was just having them press in their
            thumbs and telling them not to make it too fat.

            I also can't believe that Ann teaches 40 kids at a
            time- WHOA!! I will be tackling the issue again with a
            new group on Monday and I know that I will be better
            equipped because of all of the great advice! - Mikel



            __________________________________
            Yahoo! FareChase: Search multiple travel sites in one click.
            http://farechase.yahoo.com
          • Susan Michael
            I saw a segment on DIY network about pinch pots this week. http://www.diynet.com/ search pinch pot DIY people Making Pinch Pots. Susan [Non-text portions of
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 5, 2005
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              I saw a segment on DIY network about pinch pots this week. http://www.diynet.com/ search pinch pot
              DIY people Making Pinch Pots. Susan

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • wymystic
              Hi, Mikelle I wanted to add a few thoughts: Thought ONE When I student taught in high school, my (experienced) supervising teacher let students to make ANY
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 8, 2005
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                Hi, Mikelle
                I wanted to add a few thoughts:
                Thought ONE
                When I student taught in high school, my (experienced) supervising
                teacher let students to make ANY sort of pinch pot. When the pots
                were bone dry, he showed his students how to make their pot's shape
                more symetrical, and how to make the walls/base thin enough, by
                using---> sandpaper!. The process tool SO long -- and I cannot tell
                you the amount of dust that was generated. The kids couldn't
                decorate the surface with scriffito, mishima, or texture because
                most had to sand the outside surface of their pots. Well, perhaps
                as a reaction to that experience, when I teach pinch pots ...
                A) To avoid tears, I tell them UP FRONT that we WILL spend 2 days
                doing NOTHING BUT making pinch pots!
                B) I tell my students that if they cannot rough out a centered
                pinch pot with fairly uniform walls and base in about three
                minutes, then they need to start over because the problems will
                compound themselves as they continue to work with their pots.

                EVERYONE gets a ball of clay and access to a spritz water bottle
                (one bottle for 4 students sitting across from one another) First we
                insert a thumb and push almost to the bottom. I tell them at this
                point that clay moves at right angles to the direction in which the
                force is applied, and I show them how to change their finger
                positions to create either a ball-ish or a taller pinch pot from
                the "get-go." Over the course of the two days, they have to try
                both ...

                Once we create our pinch pots--or when the timer sounds out in five
                minutes, which ever comes first--we stop and immediately cut our
                pinch pots vertically in half with a wire. We want to inspect our
                walls and base for uniformity, and to see if we made a uniformly and
                SLIGHTLY thicker shoulder, and retaining rim at the opening. Next,
                we make notes (drawn diagrams for little folks) in our process
                journals, put the clay back into a ball, I set the timer and we all
                proceed to make yet another pinch pot. The second day I let them
                work at their own pace. If a student has trouble creating a centered
                opening, I will make up a bunch of balls of clay so the student can
                practice just THAT part of it over and over till the technique is
                mastered.

                I have about 32 minutes of actual teaching time with my kids ....
                Over the course of these first two days, each child usually makes at
                least ten basic pinch pots--NONE of which may be kept...PERIOD. This
                policy truly LEVELS the playing field! The beginning student doesn't
                feel so vulnerable because they know that EVERYONE's pots will be
                torn down--and that we will all learn from analyzing both the good,
                the improving, and the icky pots (though we don't call them that!).
                Not allowing the first pots to be kept also allows EVERYONE to get
                the practice we need up front. uring this time, I can catch
                technical errors and help students adapt BEFORE the incorrect
                proceedure becomes a habit. The students learn how to keep their
                clay moistened and conditioned as they go. When they cut their pots
                down and inspect the insides of their walls and base, students learn
                what those sneeky air bubbles ("invisible" on the outside) LOOK LIKE
                when they're hiding inside the walls of their pots. When we've
                pretty much mastered the technique, I encourage my students to bring
                someone to the art room (lunch & after school) and teach THEM how to
                create a pinch pot!

                Although I've been teaching in middle school for the past seven
                years, I've successfully taught clay pinch pots to grades 2-12 by
                this method. We always have a LOT of time to decorate or alter our
                basic pots because, having had that intense practice in the
                beginning, the kids form their basic pots very well the first time!
                They love it--so do I!

                THOUGHT TWO: I like to have the students make ocarinas from their
                pinch pots ... There are several ways to do that, but I like to make
                birds by flattening in one pinch pot. I cannot find the ULR to the
                site that has these directions right now. If someone wants, I'll
                post it when I find it.
                Another way to create an ocarina in animal forms is by joining two
                pinch pots of similar size. <<http://www.carousel-
                music.com/nf/ocarinasnf.html>>
                <<http://www.green.ltd.uk/ocarina>>
                <<http://www.friendsoffreedom.com/Crafts/Ocarinas/OcarinaPg.html>>

                Blessings
                Doree
                § :~D)>+


                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "mikellee31" <mikellee31@y...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Hi everyone, I am not new to the list, but I do not know if I have
                ever formally introduced
                > myself. I have been a secondary art teacher for the past 7 years
                and this year I have
                > switched to teaching 1st-5th elementary. I have about 540
                students. I see them once a
                > week for 1 hour for a total of 25 classes! I was a candidate for
                National Board Cert. but
                > after changing levels I decided that I am pretty much a first year
                teacher and I needed to
                > put that on hold, so I withdrew....
                >
                > I have had a lot of trouble with all sorts of things, but right
                now it is ceramics. I have
                > always taught by teaching the vocab, the rules, and the techniques
                and then allowing
                > studio after some planning on the part of the students. Today was
                my first day trying clay
                > with the kids and I tried coil with some classes and pinch pots
                with some....they all looked
                > horrible!! Not in the kids cool type of horrible, but in the
                completely not getting it at all
                > type of horrible!
                >
                > I noticed that at the beginning of the year the kids were asking
                me to make specific thing
                > out of clay - like 4th grade wanted to make "turtles" because that
                is what the previous
                > teacher did with 4th grade....and 5th grade wanted to make food. I
                just don't quite know
                > what is the best way to approach teaching this age and I am not
                feeling too good about
                > saying " we are all making dogs" or something like that- However
                they don't seem to be
                > responding too well to open ended assignments. Any advice on how
                to structure? It seems
                > like I am stuck between process and product and lack of time to
                have enough process to
                > develop a product- ha ha! - Any help on or off topic on or off
                list is welcome.
                >
              • Leah Korican
                this is a great idea!!!!! thank you. leah ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 8, 2005
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                  this is a great idea!!!!! thank you.

                  leah
                  On Nov 8, 2005, at 4:39 PM, wymystic wrote:

                  > Hi, Mikelle
                  > I wanted to add a few thoughts: 
                  > Thought ONE
                  > When I student taught in high school, my (experienced) supervising
                  > teacher let students to make ANY sort of pinch pot.  When the pots
                  > were bone dry, he showed his students how to make their pot's shape
                  > more symetrical, and how to make the walls/base thin enough, by
                  > using---> sandpaper!.  The process tool SO long -- and I cannot tell
                  > you the amount of dust that was generated. The kids couldn't
                  > decorate the surface with scriffito, mishima, or texture because
                  > most had to sand the outside surface of their pots.    Well, perhaps
                  > as a reaction to that experience, when I teach pinch pots ...
                  > A) To avoid tears, I tell them UP FRONT that we WILL spend 2 days
                  > doing NOTHING BUT making pinch pots! 
                  > B) I tell my students that if they cannot rough out a centered
                  > pinch pot with fairly uniform  walls and base in about three
                  > minutes, then they need to start over because the problems will
                  > compound themselves as they continue to work with their pots. 
                  >
                  > EVERYONE gets a ball of clay and access to a spritz water bottle
                  > (one bottle for 4 students sitting across from one another) First we
                  > insert a thumb and push almost to the bottom.  I tell them at this
                  > point that clay moves at right angles to the direction in which the
                  > force is applied, and I show them how to change their finger
                  > positions to create either a ball-ish or a taller pinch pot from
                  > the "get-go."    Over the course of the two days, they have to try
                  > both ...
                  >
                  > Once we create our pinch pots--or when the timer sounds out in five
                  > minutes, which ever comes first--we stop and immediately cut our
                  > pinch pots vertically in half with a wire.  We want to inspect our
                  > walls and base for uniformity, and to see if we made a uniformly and
                  > SLIGHTLY thicker shoulder, and retaining rim at the opening.  Next,
                  > we make notes (drawn diagrams for little folks) in our process
                  > journals, put the clay back into a ball, I set the timer and we all
                  > proceed to make yet another pinch pot.  The second day I let them
                  > work at their own pace. If a student has trouble creating a centered
                  > opening, I will make up a bunch of balls of clay so the student can
                  > practice just THAT part of it over and over till the technique is
                  > mastered.
                  >
                  > I have about 32 minutes of actual teaching time with my kids ....
                  > Over the course of these first two days, each child usually makes at
                  > least ten basic pinch pots--NONE of which may be kept...PERIOD. This
                  > policy truly LEVELS the playing field! The beginning student doesn't
                  > feel so vulnerable because they know that EVERYONE's pots will be
                  > torn down--and that we will all learn from analyzing both the good,
                  > the improving, and the icky pots (though we don't call them that!).
                  > Not allowing the first pots to be kept also allows EVERYONE to get
                  > the practice we need up front.  uring this time, I can catch
                  > technical errors and help students adapt BEFORE the incorrect
                  > proceedure becomes a habit.  The students learn how to keep their
                  > clay moistened and conditioned as they go.  When they cut their pots
                  > down and inspect the insides of their walls and base, students learn
                  > what those sneeky air bubbles ("invisible" on the outside) LOOK LIKE
                  > when they're hiding inside the walls of their pots.  When we've
                  > pretty much mastered the technique, I encourage my students to bring
                  > someone to the art room (lunch & after school) and teach THEM how to
                  > create a pinch pot! 
                  >
                  > Although I've been teaching in middle school for the past seven
                  > years, I've successfully taught clay pinch pots to grades 2-12 by
                  > this method. We always have a LOT of time to decorate or alter our
                  > basic pots because, having had that intense practice in the
                  > beginning, the kids form their basic pots very well the first time!
                  > They love it--so do I!
                  >
                  > THOUGHT TWO:  I like to have the students make ocarinas from their
                  > pinch pots ... There are several ways to do that, but I like to make
                  > birds by flattening in one pinch pot.  I cannot find the ULR to the
                  > site that has these directions right now.  If someone wants, I'll
                  > post it when I find it. 
                  > Another way to create an ocarina in animal forms is by joining two
                  > pinch pots of similar size.  <<http://www.carousel-
                  > music.com/nf/ocarinasnf.html>>
                  > <<http://www.green.ltd.uk/ocarina>>
                  > <<http://www.friendsoffreedom.com/Crafts/Ocarinas/OcarinaPg.html>>
                  >
                  > Blessings
                  > Doree
                  > § :~D)>+
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "mikellee31" <mikellee31@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi everyone, I am not new to the list, but I do not know if I have
                  > ever formally introduced
                  > > myself. I have been a secondary art teacher for the past 7 years
                  > and this year I have
                  > > switched to teaching 1st-5th elementary. I have about 540
                  > students. I see them once a
                  > > week for 1 hour for a total of 25 classes! I was a candidate for
                  > National Board Cert. but
                  > > after changing levels I decided that I am pretty much a first year
                  > teacher and I needed to
                  > > put that on hold, so I withdrew....
                  > >
                  > > I have had a lot of trouble with all sorts of things, but right
                  > now it is ceramics. I have
                  > > always taught by teaching the vocab, the rules, and the techniques
                  > and then allowing
                  > > studio after some planning on the part of the students. Today was
                  > my first day trying clay
                  > > with the kids and I tried coil with some classes and pinch pots
                  > with some....they all looked
                  > > horrible!! Not in the kids cool type of horrible, but in the
                  > completely not getting it at all
                  > > type of horrible! 
                  > >
                  > > I noticed that at the beginning of the year the kids were asking
                  > me to make specific thing
                  > > out of clay - like 4th grade wanted to make "turtles" because that
                  > is what the previous
                  > > teacher did with 4th grade....and 5th grade wanted to make food. I
                  > just don't quite know
                  > > what is the best way to approach teaching this age and I am not
                  > feeling too good about
                  > > saying " we are all making dogs" or something like that- However
                  > they don't seem to be
                  > > responding too well to open ended assignments.  Any advice on how
                  > to structure? It seems
                  > > like I am stuck between process and product and lack of time to
                  > have enough process to
                  > > develop a product- ha ha! - Any help on or off topic on or off
                  > list is welcome.
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                  >
                  > ▪  Visit your group "art_education" on the web.
                  >  
                  > ▪  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  >  art_education-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >  
                  > ▪  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  > Service.
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • bruthrobson@aol.com
                  I would love the url for making the birds with pinch pots if you find it! Spose this would work for air dry clay or sculpey? Brenda Hi, Mikelle ... [Non-text
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 9, 2005
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                    I would love the url for making the birds with pinch pots if you find it!
                    Spose this would work for air dry clay or sculpey?
                    Brenda




                    Hi, Mikelle
                    > I wanted to add a few thoughts:
                    > Thought ONE
                    > When I student taught in high school, my (experienced) supervising
                    > teacher let students to make ANY sort of pinch pot. When the pots
                    > were bone dry, he showed his students how to make their pot's shape
                    > more symetrical, and how to make the walls/base thin enough, by
                    > using---> sandpaper!. The process tool SO long -- and I cannot tell
                    > you the amount of dust that was generated. The kids couldn't
                    > decorate the surface with scriffito, mishima, or texture because
                    > most had to sand the outside surface of their pots. Well, perhaps
                    > as a reaction to that experience, when I teach pinch pots ...
                    > A) To avoid tears, I tell them UP FRONT that we WILL spend 2 days
                    > doing NOTHING BUT making pinch pots!
                    > B) I tell my students that if they cannot rough out a centered
                    > pinch pot with fairly uniform walls and base in about three
                    > minutes, then they need to start over because the problems will
                    > compound themselves as they continue to work with their pots.
                    >
                    > EVERYONE gets a ball of clay and access to a spritz water bottle
                    > (one bottle for 4 students sitting across from one another) First we
                    > insert a thumb and push almost to the bottom. I tell them at this
                    > point that clay moves at right angles to the direction in which the
                    > force is applied, and I show them how to change their finger
                    > positions to create either a ball-ish or a taller pinch pot from
                    > the "get-go." Over the course of the two days, they have to try
                    > both ...
                    >
                    > Once we create our pinch pots--or when the timer sounds out in five
                    > minutes, which ever comes first--we stop and immediately cut our
                    > pinch pots vertically in half with a wire. We want to inspect our
                    > walls and base for uniformity, and to see if we made a uniformly and
                    > SLIGHTLY thicker shoulder, and retaining rim at the opening. Next,
                    > we make notes (drawn diagrams for little folks) in our process
                    > journals, put the clay back into a ball, I set the timer and we all
                    > proceed to make yet another pinch pot. The second day I let them
                    > work at their own pace. If a student has trouble creating a centered
                    > opening, I will make up a bunch of balls of clay so the student can
                    > practice just THAT part of it over and over till the technique is
                    > mastered.
                    >
                    > I have about 32 minutes of actual teaching time with my kids ....
                    > Over the course of these first two days, each child usually makes at
                    > least ten basic pinch pots--NONE of which may be kept...PERIOD. This
                    > policy truly LEVELS the playing field! The beginning student doesn't
                    > feel so vulnerable because they know that EVERYONE's pots will be
                    > torn down--and that we will all learn from analyzing both the good,
                    > the improving, and the icky pots (though we don't call them that!).
                    > Not allowing the first pots to be kept also allows EVERYONE to get
                    > the practice we need up front. uring this time, I can catch
                    > technical errors and help students adapt BEFORE the incorrect
                    > proceedure becomes a habit. The students learn how to keep their
                    > clay moistened and conditioned as they go. When they cut their pots
                    > down and inspect the insides of their walls and base, students learn
                    > what those sneeky air bubbles ("invisible" on the outside) LOOK LIKE
                    > when they're hiding inside the walls of their pots. When we've
                    > pretty much mastered the technique, I encourage my students to bring
                    > someone to the art room (lunch & after school) and teach THEM how to
                    > create a pinch pot!
                    >
                    > Although I've been teaching in middle school for the past seven
                    > years, I've successfully taught clay pinch pots to grades 2-12 by
                    > this method. We always have a LOT of time to decorate or alter our
                    > basic pots because, having had that intense practice in the
                    > beginning, the kids form their basic pots very well the first time!
                    > They love it--so do I!
                    >
                    > THOUGHT TWO: I like to have the students make ocarinas from their
                    > pinch pots ... There are several ways to do that, but I like to make
                    > birds by flattening in one pinch pot. I cannot find the ULR to the
                    > site that has these directions right now. If someone wants, I'll
                    > post it when I find it.
                    > Another way to create an ocarina in animal forms is by joining two
                    > pinch pots of similar size. <<http://www.carousel-
                    > music.com/nf/ocarinasnf.html>>
                    > <<http://www.green.ltd.uk/ocarina>>
                    > <<http://www.friendsoffreedom.com/Crafts/Ocarinas/OcarinaPg.html>>
                    >
                    > Blessings
                    > Doree
                    > § :~D)>+
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "mikellee31" <mikellee31@y...>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi everyone, I am not new to the list, but I do not know if I have
                    > ever formally introduced
                    > > myself. I have been a secondary art teacher for the past 7 years
                    > and this year I have
                    > > switched to teaching 1st-5th elementary. I have about 540
                    > students. I see them once a
                    > > week for 1 hour for a total of 25 classes! I was a candidate for
                    > National Board Cert. but
                    > > after changing levels I decided that I am pretty much a first year
                    > teacher and I needed to
                    > > put that on hold, so I withdrew....
                    > >
                    > > I have had a lot of trouble with all sorts of things, but right
                    > now it is ceramics. I have
                    > > always taught by teaching the vocab, the rules, and the techniques
                    > and then allowing
                    > > studio after some planning on the part of the students. Today was
                    > my first day trying clay
                    > > with the kids and I tried coil with some classes and pinch pots
                    > with some....they all looked
                    > > horrible!! Not in the kids cool type of horrible, but in the
                    > completely not getting it at all
                    > > type of horrible!
                    > >
                    > > I noticed that at the beginning of the year the kids were asking
                    > me to make specific thing
                    > > out of clay - like 4th grade wanted to make "turtles" because that
                    > is what the previous
                    > > teacher did with 4th grade....and 5th grade wanted to make food. I
                    > just don't quite know
                    > > what is the best way to approach teaching this age and I am not
                    > feeling too good about
                    > > saying " we are all making dogs" or something like that- However
                    > they don't seem to be
                    > > responding too well to open ended assignments. Any advice on how
                    > to structure? It seems
                    > > like I am stuck between process and product and lack of time to
                    > have enough process to
                    > > develop a product- ha ha! - Any help on or off topic on or off
                    > list is welcome.
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                    >
                    > 〓 Visit your group "art_education" on the web.
                    >
                    > 〓 To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > art_education-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > 〓 Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                    > Service.
                    >
                    >


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