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Re: "I'm done" activities

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  • artteachermrsmoulton
    Sarah, I too, have 60 minute classes. Yes, it is hard to keep them going for that amount of time. However, here are some tips. They seem to work for me so
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 2, 2005
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      Sarah,

      I too, have 60 minute classes. Yes, it is hard to keep them going for that amount of time.
      However, here are some tips. They seem to work for me so try them out and let me know
      how you do:

      1. I have a "Free Draw" section in my room which contains a drawer of colored paper and
      white paper all different sizes. When a student is finished with the project, he/she shows
      me their work and I hand them a rubric which they must fill in. If they feel that they have
      completed this project to the best of their ability, then I direct them to the "Free Draw"
      station. Every once in awhile I surprise my students and tell them that I'm going to grade
      one of their free draw pictures. WOW, now that get's them thinking and creating as
      opposed to just wasting time or causing mischief.

      2. My younger students are more of a challenge especially because EVERYBODY wants to
      get to the "Free Draw" station. Most of the time, I adjust the lesson so that all follow the
      directions at the same time. Sometimes I just plan a "Free Draw" lesson so that everyone
      can participate near the end of the class time.

      Hope this is of some use.

      Tina
    • Victoria Patterson
      My 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades have one 80-minute block each week...and I love it. (it used to be 90 minutes...cuts, ya know! ) We tried it as a sort of pilot
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 2, 2005
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        My 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades have one 80-minute block each week...and I love it. (it used to be 90 minutes...cuts, ya know! ) We tried it as a sort of "pilot" many years ago, first as a 60-30 spit of the (then) 90 minutes per week. The 60 minute session was the "studio" class, and the 30 minutes was used for art history, background on a process, videos, critique, etc. When we were cut back to 80 minutes, we decided to skip the split time for upper grades. (K-1-2 have 2 40-minute classes) At first it took a little creative planning, but now it's a breeze. For more intense lessons, like clay and paper mache, it's hard to get them to stop after 80 minutes! ...and they get so much done!! For other lessons, I just break the time up into different activities, or demonstrations for various "parts" of the lesson. Sometimes we start or end the time with a little art history "brief" or a critique, or journaling.
        Vicki

        Smth06192000@... wrote:
        Wow..you are so lucky--I would love an hour. If I had an hour I would have
        journals for the children-possibly to respond to a project they just
        finished.Keep the journals with you until the end of the school year. Maybe at the end
        of the year have a journal show to highlight simple assignments and written
        reflections. I allow a quick 5 minutes for each student to briefly "share"
        their work. Each is called and they hold up the work--it allows a child to feel
        really good about themselves-I make comments about the work--it is just a
        great time to have with students I only see once a week. The extra 15 minutes
        could expand a "share" session. I guess you could also expand the art history a
        spect of the project. My students love looking at more art work of
        professional artists.
        Maria


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      • Kelli Wilke
        When you say you have students fill in the rubric what do you mean? Kelli artteachermrsmoulton wrote: Sarah, I too, have 60
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 3, 2005
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          When you say you have students "fill in the rubric" what do you mean?

          Kelli

          artteachermrsmoulton <artteachermrsmoulton@...> wrote:
          Sarah,

          I too, have 60 minute classes. Yes, it is hard to keep them going for that amount of time.
          However, here are some tips. They seem to work for me so try them out and let me know
          how you do:

          1. I have a "Free Draw" section in my room which contains a drawer of colored paper and
          white paper all different sizes. When a student is finished with the project, he/she shows
          me their work and I hand them a rubric which they must fill in. If they feel that they have
          completed this project to the best of their ability, then I direct them to the "Free Draw"
          station. Every once in awhile I surprise my students and tell them that I'm going to grade
          one of their free draw pictures. WOW, now that get's them thinking and creating as
          opposed to just wasting time or causing mischief.

          2. My younger students are more of a challenge especially because EVERYBODY wants to
          get to the "Free Draw" station. Most of the time, I adjust the lesson so that all follow the
          directions at the same time. Sometimes I just plan a "Free Draw" lesson so that everyone
          can participate near the end of the class time.

          Hope this is of some use.

          Tina





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        • Tina Moulton
          Kelli, Lots of factors determine how the students fill in the rubric -- how much time is left in the period, age of students, ability level etc. My older
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 3, 2005
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            Kelli,

            Lots of factors determine how the students fill in the rubric -- how much time is left in the period, age of students, ability level etc. My older students have the opportunity to self evaluate some of the lessons. Therefore, they would actually write on the rubric.

            Hope this helps.

            tina
            On Wednesday, August 03, 2005, at 08:11AM, Kelli Wilke <kdenne14@...> wrote:

            >When you say you have students "fill in the rubric" what do you mean?
            >
            >Kelli
            >
            >artteachermrsmoulton <artteachermrsmoulton@...> wrote:
            >Sarah,
            >
            >I too, have 60 minute classes. Yes, it is hard to keep them going for that amount of time.
            >However, here are some tips. They seem to work for me so try them out and let me know
            >how you do:
            >
            >1. I have a "Free Draw" section in my room which contains a drawer of colored paper and
            >white paper all different sizes. When a student is finished with the project, he/she shows
            >me their work and I hand them a rubric which they must fill in. If they feel that they have
            >completed this project to the best of their ability, then I direct them to the "Free Draw"
            >station. Every once in awhile I surprise my students and tell them that I'm going to grade
            >one of their free draw pictures. WOW, now that get's them thinking and creating as
            >opposed to just wasting time or causing mischief.
            >
            >2. My younger students are more of a challenge especially because EVERYBODY wants to
            >get to the "Free Draw" station. Most of the time, I adjust the lesson so that all follow the
            >directions at the same time. Sometimes I just plan a "Free Draw" lesson so that everyone
            >can participate near the end of the class time.
            >
            >Hope this is of some use.
            >
            >Tina
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >SPONSORED LINKS
            >Art education High school Fine art Continuing education Fine art poster Fine art reproductions
            >
            >---------------------------------
            >YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
            >
            > Visit your group "art_education" on the web.
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > art_education-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            >
            >
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            >
            >
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          • familyerickson
            I just bought a nifty poster today. I got it at Mardels which is a teacher store. It is manufactured by TREND. It says: THINGS TO DO when you re done READ
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 3, 2005
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              I just bought a nifty poster today. I got it at Mardels which is a
              "teacher" store. It is manufactured by TREND.

              It says:

              THINGS TO DO
              when you're done
              READ

              WRITE

              PLAY

              COMPLETE

              CREATE

              DRAW

              STUDY

              HELP

              CLEAN

              I filled it in like this:
              THINGS TO DO
              when you're done
              READ
              -a book about art
              WRITE
              -a story about your artwork
              PLAY
              -an Art Game
              COMPLETE
              -a project you are behind on
              -a second one similar to what you just did
              CREATE
              -a sculpture using the materials on the shelf
              DRAW
              -on the free draw paper
              -on the windows using the special markers (Crayola Window markers)
              STUDY
              -a book about an artist
              HELP
              -ask Mrs. Erickson about doing a chore around the art room
              CLEAN
              -the sinks

              I will mount the poster next to the shelf where I keep free draw paper,
              special books, a few art games, special supplies etc.
            • Laurie Reber
              I have found that kids love to do origami. I teach junior high school, so I am not sure how it would work with really young ones, but if you had instructions
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 3, 2005
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                I have found that kids love to do origami. I teach junior high school, so I am not sure how it would work with really young ones, but if you had instructions with diagrams for very simple designs for the really young ones and have the paper pre-cut, they can just grab the instructions/paper and take it back to their table to work on it. I am having my students make about 9 paper cranes each (will be over 1800 total) and we are going to thread them onto fishing line and hang them at the entry to our school on World Peace Day. The cranes will be a visual reminder as they will represent the number of US soldier fatalities in Iraq. The number keeps rising, so my students work diligently to represent each one with their paper cranes.

                Hope this helps!
                Laurie

                spetersenart <spetersen@...> wrote:
                I recently got a new job as a grade 1-6 art teacher, previously I
                taught 45 minute classes. At my new school I have students for one
                hour - which is great for larger projects and going more in depth.
                However, I'm sure there will be times when some students will be
                finished early..... So I'm looking for some easy, little to no clean up
                activities that will build on skills (also with little to no expense).

                As an added note.... I've had games/clean up activities previously and
                have had trouble with kids hurrying to finish so that they could do
                the "extra" activities?? Any tricks on how to get past that?

                Thank you!
                Sarah





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              • Ann Gray
                I have many activities in my room that the students can do when they are finished. Like a message posted earlier, some students want to rush to these
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 8, 2005
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                  I have many activities in my room that the students can do when they
                  are finished. Like a message posted earlier, some students want to
                  rush to these activities, so they have to show me their project first
                  so that I can verify that they have completed the rubric that I made
                  for that activity.

                  I have a laminated manila envelope with 60 ideas for drawings - a
                  student may pick 2 without looking, and choose their favorite. Years
                  ago, a teacher in another district gave us another idea. I have 2
                  more laminated manila envelopes. One has nouns, and one has very
                  creative adjectives. A student picks one card from each, then has to
                  illustrate the phrase. My favorite example is a student years ago who
                  drew the words "frightened pickle." He drew a large bumpy dill pickle
                  with a frightened expression and brought it to show me. I asked him
                  what it was frigtened of. He added a menacing looking upright vacuum
                  cleaner with a face where the light is, and said that the pickle was
                  afraid that the vacuum cleaner would suck him up! I have used these 2
                  envelopes when I was doing cartooning, also.

                  I have many drawing books that I have collected over my 21 years of
                  teaching. There is always recyclable paper on a shelf nearby. THEY
                  MAY NOT TRACE!I have 2 crates of activities that I believe use skills
                  needed in art and across the curriculum. I have several puzzles that
                  range from easy to more difficult (I teach 1-5). I have several
                  building sets: zoobs, plastic straws with connectors, and shapes that
                  connect on edges and in their centers. I have several sets of shapes
                  that can be laid out to make a picture, and then a rubbing or a
                  drawing can be made by copying the shapes. I have 2 tangram sets in
                  plastic boxes that came with sets of cards to show how to put the
                  shapes together. I have 2 magnetic sculpture sets. And, the favorite
                  of almost everyone, I have many bags of modeling clay. Three years
                  ago one of our grade levels donated plastic tote trays with low edges
                  that they no longer used. I have 20 of them, and the students must
                  work inside of them with the clay.

                  All of my activities are divided up so that more students can use
                  them (I usually have 40 in a class at a time). I used to keep them in
                  ziplock bags, but they always tore and quit "zipping," so I'm trying
                  plastic containers with lids that I got from the dollar store this
                  year. Occasionally, if one group finishes an activity before the
                  other groups in their grade level, we will have a day where we all
                  use these activities.

                  A lot of these have taken me years to accumulate. I have a very small
                  budget, so I have either purchased them myself, or used money from
                  our PTA.

                  Ann in Oklahoma
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