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  • zuszes
    I am new to the list though I have been enjoying the information on the Incredible Art Department web site for some time. I am a high school art teacher in
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 9, 2005
      I am new to the list though I have been enjoying the information on
      the Incredible Art Department web site for some time. I am a high
      school art teacher in west Texas.
      I know this may seem early to most of you but I only have one week
      left before school starts. As usual I am scrambling to do some of
      those things on my "to do" list when school let out. I look forward
      to exchanging ideas with you.
      Susan
    • Ken Rohrer
      Welcome Susan! We ve had many new members lately. I ll bet it gets pretty hot in your part of the state. Ken ... Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 23:40:15 -0000 From:
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 11, 2005
        Welcome Susan! We've had many new members lately. I'll
        bet it gets pretty hot in your part of the state.

        Ken

        --- art_education@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 23:40:15 -0000
        From: "zuszes" <zuszes@...>
        Subject: New to the list

        I am new to the list though I have been enjoying the
        information on the Incredible Art Department web site
        for some time. I am a high school art teacher in west
        Texas. I know this may seem early to most of you but I
        only have one week left before school starts. As usual
        I am scrambling to do some ofthose things on my "to
        do" list when school let out. I look forward
        to exchanging ideas with you.
        Susan
      • seberlie
        Hi everyone... I am new to the list. Formerly I taught art Pre-K through grade 12 and loved it. I resigned about 6 years ago to start my own business which has
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 12, 2011
          Hi everyone...
          I am new to the list. Formerly I taught art Pre-K through grade 12 and loved it. I resigned about 6 years ago to start my own business which has nothing to do with teaching. I thought it was time I acted on my lifetime dream. It has worked out very well and at this point I find I am missing the art teaching. I have been thinking of giving private lessons possibly to adults as well as children but really am not sure where to start...like what to charge per hour, starting lessons and techniques etc. I wss wondering if someone who has experience with this could point me in the best general direction.
          Thanks!
          Susan
        • priorhouse
          Hi Susan, The local art teacher that my son took after school art lessons with - well, she centered her lessons around the elements or art and split the
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 13, 2011
            Hi Susan,
            The local art teacher that my son took after school art lessons with - well, she centered her lessons around the elements or art and split the classes up to Fall and Spring. We paid for eight (I think) Fall lessons and then ten spring lessons. Her outline for the year stated the element for each class. The first few classes were all on color, then the next two or three were on shape, etc.. She added principles of design as it fit, but her class schedule always followed the elements and then lessons varied each year. It was simple and easy to follow.
            Some of the lessons my son loved the most - a bear sketch that each student made following her step by step, which she taught value with and it built student confidence. The Fall leaves, each student collected leaves to draw and then water colored their drawings adding customized design to the negative space. And then in a printing lesson - my son made a beautiful cross in linoleum - and then made greeting cards with custom prints.

            As an art teacher, Some of the lessons that wow the learners/parents the most each year are usually anything perspective, richly made oil pastel pics ( line or shape designs, Okeeffe flowers, cityscapes) or anything painting. Animal prints are popular too. Students also love glitter - recently, one student made a mountain scene and used black glitter on the road and it was amazing. I follow standards, but I like to add some of the favorite things in. Parents also seem to like hearing their students use art vocabulary - so in your program be sure to teach all ages some art terms, various art criticism, and masterpieces...

            As an art teacher previously, you may have tons of these ideas, but I have also seen art programs use monthly themes. For example, January is math in art month with artist focus of Picasso (or whoever) - lessons will include cubism sketches, cardboard collage, realistic blue paintings, and tessellation pics. I like themes too, but try to keep things flexible to adapt to my interests or student likes - because things come up as you teach - like one year I had a group of middle schoolers go crazy with symbols in art - so we added an extra week with this theme.

            If you have mixed ages in a class, in my experience, older kids do not always like doing the same lesson as younger students - so I try to give older students things that feel more their level -which is sometimes tricky for some students that have a very limited ART background.

            It also helps to send home notes about what the student did - especially for things that look odd. i.e. This week we worked on upside down contour drawings - and students... Or this week we used only warm colors because... The little notes not only reinforce the lesson to the student and possibly become a keep sake for them with work they save, but parents learn or reinforce their skills as they skim what comes home. I also try and have students write a descriptive sentence in their sketchbooks or lightly on the back of certain pieces. i.e. This is a still life picture modeled after such and such. That way years later, they will recall some helpful details about the piece and the lesson. When a child brings home a piece of artwork - the parents have an opinion that is usually enriched with a few details that talk up the lesson or point out the key concepts involved. It is worth the time to make or give notes on some lessons.

            For ideas on what to charge - check some past posts from this group - especially some recent ones where many posts discussed fees.

            While building your art lesson clientele, you will need to have ways to attract students and get them looped in. Many years ago, we met an art teacher because she offered five dollar art classes once a month. She usually had to have at least 9 or 10 sign up - and I am sure the classes were not her money making classes, but they allowed people a way to do an inexpensive (but still nice) art project while getting exposed to her as art teacher. For example, one lesson was a Christmas ornament - the clear, glass bulb that kids added paint to ( which later did not survive our attic heat -lol), but the students liked making it. Another $5.00 lesson had the students paint a basic tile that would be fired and picked up at the next class (or we could drop by and get it anytime). Students could upgrade to a more expensive ceramic piece if wanted, but the tile was the price grabber here. We could then sign up for more classes in her basement studio - and I think she did build some of her clientele through the monthly five dollar lessons. Also, the monthly 5$ lessons gave many people a way to have art experiences that were low cost and low commitment (which is also a type of giving or outreach that makes the world a better place and may make people feel better in retirement - to have given back along the way can bring intrinsic satisfaction....).

            However you decide to market your lessons or program- be sure to offer classes that give students a chance to make a few custom pieces they are proud of and want to keep.
            HTH a bit,

            Mrs. Prior in VA
            >><<<
            - I have been thinking of giving private lessons possibly to adults as well as children but really am not sure where to start...like what to charge per hour, starting lessons and techniques etc.
            > Susan
            >
          • seberlie
            Thank you for all your information! This gives me some great ideas and a starting point! Susan
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 14, 2011
              Thank you for all your information! This gives me some great ideas and a starting point!
              Susan

              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "priorhouse" <priorhouse@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Susan,
              > The local art teacher that my son took after school art lessons with - well, she centered her lessons around the elements or art and split the classes up to Fall and Spring. We paid for eight (I think) Fall lessons and then ten spring lessons. Her outline for the year stated the element for each class.
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