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Re: Alternative to Glazing on Ceramic pieces

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  • jdecker4art
    Thanks Jeff, This is a great thread... lets add on to this. 1. Wood look Patina Brush with thinned brown acrylic - wipe off with damp cloth before it dries
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 7, 2005
      Thanks Jeff,

      This is a great thread... lets add on to this.

      1. Wood look Patina
      Brush with thinned brown acrylic - wipe off with damp cloth before
      it dries completely then brush with black into and wipe off. YOu can
      burnish this with shoe polish. My student used this on our African
      inspired boxes.

      Alternate to this is using wood stains and shoe polish (but acrylic
      is better for middle school).

      2. Watercolors washes - wipe off raised areas - then finish with
      glass medium

      3. Verdi gris - for older students (must use gloves for this).
      Copper topper or bronze topper - then use the verdi gris. ONLY do
      this with close supervision.

      4. Verdi gris can be done with acrylics - Rub n' Buff for high
      lights - then wipe with bluish green tempera. Experiment.

      5. Paint piece black with flat paint. Then color with oil pastels.
      You can spread colors with a bit of thinner on Q-tips. It helps to
      mix white with the colors.

      6. Spray paints (for older students) - layer black/brown - then a
      light dusting of metallic (for sculptures.

      Share you alternate ideas for finishing ceramics without glazing.

      I have several lesson on my site that use alternate finishes.

      Regards,

      Judy Decker
    • Sheba
      This is a great alternative to the cost of using glazes. I have also found that water color paints on bisque fired pieces works really well. and the colors
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 8, 2005
        This is a great alternative to the cost of using glazes.

        I have also found that water color paints on bisque fired pieces works
        really well. and the colors will LOOK like the kids think they will
        look. Then you can spray with an acrylic gloss to seal. I had several
        successful projects this way. These are clay rattles about baseball
        size.
        examples:
        http://thevirtualclassroom.org/rattlehoeft2.jpg
        http://thevirtualclassroom.org/rattlejames.jpg
        http://thevirtualclassroom.org/rattlepingal.jpg
        http://thevirtualclassroom.org/rattleayers.jpg
        http://thevirtualclassroom.org/2002.html

        Sheba~Cynthia Artist/ Educator "multi-faceted creative visionary"
        The ART Site
        http://www.sheba-kitty-productions.com/
        The School Site
        http://thevirtualclassroom.org/
      • buschini@verizon.net
        using watercolors or thinned down tempera on bisque fired pieces is nice, and then rubbing with wax shoepolish (gets into the crevices and really unifies and
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 8, 2005
          using watercolors or thinned down tempera on bisque fired pieces is nice, and
          then rubbing with wax shoepolish (gets into the crevices and really unifies
          and ages piece), can finish with butcher wax instead of acrylic.
        • aburison
          Great thread! Here are some things that have worked well for me: My advanced ceramics class does a unit on primitive ceramics and we burnish pinch pots with
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 8, 2005
            Great thread! Here are some things that have worked well for me:

            My advanced ceramics class does a unit on primitive ceramics and we
            burnish pinch pots with river rocks before firing them in a sawdust
            kiln. Take an old metal garbage can with a lid and poke a bunch of
            holes in the sides with a screwdriver or awl for air to circulate.
            Layer sawdust (we get free from local lumber yard) a few inches deep
            into the bottom of the can. Scatter the pots and layer with more
            sawdust, repeat until you have about 6 inches from the top. Crumble
            a few pages of newspaper and light. In about 15 seconds the sawdust
            begins to burn and I cover with the lid and let burn down. This
            takes typically 6-12 hours so I start it pretty early and keep my
            afternoon free so I can stay and monitor the firing. This produces
            the most awesome smoke patterns and looks of awe from my students!

            To seal the smoke patterns (the next day) to the surface of the pots
            I place them in my classroom toaster oven at 150 for about 5-10
            minutes to warm them up. Then the students take them out (with
            leather safety gloves on) and they rub wax into the surface with a
            rag while the pot is warm and they get a nice satiny to gloss shine
            depending on how well it was burnished and how well the wax was
            applied.

            You can also make the neatest 'glaze' by laying scrap pieces of glass
            on a flat or inside of a slightly curved surface and firing it in
            your electric kiln. I have a student's mom who makes stained glass
            crafts and donates all her scraps to my classroom. I also save
            colored glass bottles (like Arizona iced tea) and break them up for
            my special 'glaze'.
          • Kelli Wilke
            Do you think that any of these alternatives could be used on air dry clay? Air dry clay has a pretty smooth surface as opposed to if you bisque fire which
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 8, 2005
              Do you think that any of these alternatives could be used on air dry clay? Air dry clay has a pretty smooth surface as opposed to if you bisque fire which gives you a more textured surface. Any suggestions??

              Kelli Wilke

              aburison <autzig@...> wrote:
              Great thread! Here are some things that have worked well for me:

              My advanced ceramics class does a unit on primitive ceramics and we
              burnish pinch pots with river rocks before firing them in a sawdust
              kiln. Take an old metal garbage can with a lid and poke a bunch of
              holes in the sides with a screwdriver or awl for air to circulate.
              Layer sawdust (we get free from local lumber yard) a few inches deep
              into the bottom of the can. Scatter the pots and layer with more
              sawdust, repeat until you have about 6 inches from the top. Crumble
              a few pages of newspaper and light. In about 15 seconds the sawdust
              begins to burn and I cover with the lid and let burn down. This
              takes typically 6-12 hours so I start it pretty early and keep my
              afternoon free so I can stay and monitor the firing. This produces
              the most awesome smoke patterns and looks of awe from my students!

              To seal the smoke patterns (the next day) to the surface of the pots
              I place them in my classroom toaster oven at 150 for about 5-10
              minutes to warm them up. Then the students take them out (with
              leather safety gloves on) and they rub wax into the surface with a
              rag while the pot is warm and they get a nice satiny to gloss shine
              depending on how well it was burnished and how well the wax was
              applied.

              You can also make the neatest 'glaze' by laying scrap pieces of glass
              on a flat or inside of a slightly curved surface and firing it in
              your electric kiln. I have a student's mom who makes stained glass
              crafts and donates all her scraps to my classroom. I also save
              colored glass bottles (like Arizona iced tea) and break them up for
              my special 'glaze'.






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            • c lee
              Depending on the age group of your students, I have a friend who has used motor oil and spray paint on his students pieces. Granted his students are in High
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 9, 2005
                Depending on the age group of your students, I have a friend who has used motor oil and spray paint on his students pieces. Granted his students are in High School which is why I caution that this type of technique would not be used with lower grade students. Oh, and he's used Iron Oxide (rust) then painted lightly with matte gloss from the craft store.

                Cathy
                Honolulu, HI

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              • aburison
                Sounds interesting. How did he use the motor oil and what did it look like? ... used motor oil and spray paint on his students pieces.
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 9, 2005
                  Sounds interesting. How did he use the motor oil and what did it look
                  like?
                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, c lee <actsilly4art@y...> wrote:
                  > Depending on the age group of your students, I have a friend who has
                  used motor oil and spray paint on his students pieces.
                • aburison
                  I am sure that you could use a wash of tempera then seal it with a spray to mimic the look of a sawdust firing. And you could use the smoothness of the air
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 9, 2005
                    I am sure that you could use a wash of tempera then seal it with a
                    spray to mimic the look of a sawdust firing. And you could use the
                    smoothness of the air dry clay to emphasize the burnishing that Native
                    American potters like Maria Martinez did in their work by having your
                    students burnish their artwork.
                    --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kelli Wilke <kdenne14@y...> wrote:
                    > Do you think that any of these alternatives could be used on air dry
                    clay? Air dry clay has a pretty smooth surface as opposed to if you
                    bisque fire which gives you a more textured surface. Any suggestions??
                    >
                  • P. Kelly
                    I don t know how this would work on air dry clay, but I have had students rub in different shades of brown shoe polish. It is shiny and not to difficult to
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 13, 2005
                      I don't know how this would work on air dry clay, but
                      I have had students rub in different shades of brown
                      shoe polish. It is shiny and not to difficult to
                      apply. The smell goes away too.
                      Patricia

                      --- aburison <autzig@...> wrote:

                      > I am sure that you could use a wash of tempera then
                      > seal it with a
                      > spray to mimic the look of a sawdust firing. And
                      > you could use the
                      > smoothness of the air dry clay to emphasize the
                      > burnishing that Native
                      > American potters like Maria Martinez did in their
                      > work by having your
                      > students burnish their artwork.
                      > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kelli Wilke
                      > <kdenne14@y...> wrote:
                      > > Do you think that any of these alternatives could
                      > be used on air dry
                      > clay? Air dry clay has a pretty smooth surface as
                      > opposed to if you
                      > bisque fire which gives you a more textured surface.
                      > Any suggestions??
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >




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