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How can I teach ceramics without a kiln?

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  • Judith Decker
    Greetings Art Educators, This is a frequent question on the art ed lists.... Here is a lesson you can do that teaches history of ceramics through drawing:
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 4 7:02 AM
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      Greetings Art Educators,

      This is a frequent question on the art ed lists....

      Here is a lesson you can do that teaches history of
      ceramics through drawing:
      http://www.artsandactivities.com/Page/Article0305c.html
      TAB Choice can adapt this lesson for one of your
      centers. It would be so easy to create some posters
      that teach a little about the history/culture -
      including various decoration of the culture.
      What stories do these ancient vessels tell? How did
      the artists abstract nature? How do you think these
      vessels were used? Students can then do a large
      drawing of vessel that is narrative (telling about
      his/her culture). An alternate idea would be scratch
      foam print of a vessel - then accented with
      Prismacolors. Cut the print vessel out and mount on
      colored paper.

      Since air dry clay is so expensive, students could
      make a small air dry vessel or plate - then decorate
      in your choice of media (paints, markers, prisma
      colors, etc). It is very easy to make a bowl by
      pressing clay inside a Chinette bowl - or make a plate
      using a Chinette plate. Simple how to's for coil pots
      or pinch potts could be outlined.

      Since Arts and Activites does not keep their articles
      online forever, I will ask permission to put this
      lesson idea on Incredible Art Department.

      This is also a lesson you could share with the social
      studies teachers...anyone can teach history of
      ceramics this way. Ceramics bridge all cultures - and
      tell us a lot about the people who made them. I
      prepared a lesson for the sixth grade special ed
      teacher to do with her students on Greek pottery.

      I posted some ceramics exhibits recently to connect to
      the lesson - London Museum (history of London through
      ceramics) and Tate Museum (modern ceramics history -
      beginning with Gauguin).

      Regards,

      Judy Decker

      Incredible Art Department
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
      Incredible Art Resources
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

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    • Charlot Cassar
      Hi As Judy (hello there) said, you do not need a kiln for a ceramics lesson! It helps but there are ways... Given you have an open body clay (add plenty of
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 4 9:42 AM
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        Hi

        As Judy (hello there) said, you do not need a kiln for a ceramics lesson! It
        helps but there are ways...

        Given you have an open body clay (add plenty of grog) you could fire small
        pinch pots and other ornaments in a a paper or saw dust kiln, or pit. There
        is also something called a teepee kiln (which I still have to try). As long
        as you limit the size of the objects and you are not too fussy if everything
        breaks then this is a wonderful learning experience for the kids. Link this
        lesson with decorating techniques, burnishing, painting with oxides,
        carving, then fire. If it comes to the worse and everything breaks, you
        could link this to archaeology and prehistory (the pots often do end up
        looking like pre historic remains) and have fun putting them back together.
        There is scope for being creative even here, in the way in which the pieces
        are put together!

        Charlot


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Judith Decker [mailto:jdecker4art@...]
        Sent: Monday, April 04, 2005 4:03 PM
        To: Art Education; Art Teachers-World; ArtsEducators; TAB-Choice
        Subject: [art_education] How can I teach ceramics without a kiln?



        Greetings Art Educators,

        This is a frequent question on the art ed lists....

        Here is a lesson you can do that teaches history of
        ceramics through drawing:
        http://www.artsandactivities.com/Page/Article0305c.html
        TAB Choice can adapt this lesson for one of your
        centers. It would be so easy to create some posters
        that teach a little about the history/culture -
        including various decoration of the culture.
        What stories do these ancient vessels tell? How did
        the artists abstract nature? How do you think these
        vessels were used? Students can then do a large
        drawing of vessel that is narrative (telling about
        his/her culture). An alternate idea would be scratch
        foam print of a vessel - then accented with
        Prismacolors. Cut the print vessel out and mount on
        colored paper.

        Since air dry clay is so expensive, students could
        make a small air dry vessel or plate - then decorate
        in your choice of media (paints, markers, prisma
        colors, etc). It is very easy to make a bowl by
        pressing clay inside a Chinette bowl - or make a plate
        using a Chinette plate. Simple how to's for coil pots
        or pinch potts could be outlined.

        Since Arts and Activites does not keep their articles
        online forever, I will ask permission to put this
        lesson idea on Incredible Art Department.

        This is also a lesson you could share with the social
        studies teachers...anyone can teach history of
        ceramics this way. Ceramics bridge all cultures - and
        tell us a lot about the people who made them. I
        prepared a lesson for the sixth grade special ed
        teacher to do with her students on Greek pottery.

        I posted some ceramics exhibits recently to connect to
        the lesson - London Museum (history of London through
        ceramics) and Tate Museum (modern ceramics history -
        beginning with Gauguin).

        Regards,

        Judy Decker

        Incredible Art Department
        http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
        Incredible Art Resources
        http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

        __________________________________________________
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        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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