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Re: [art_education] puppets

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  • Victoria Patterson
    I ve done a variety of puppets with 1st grades. Paper bags puppets are easy...using the flat brown lunch bag type. We ve done zoo animals...lots of
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 28, 2005
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      I've done a variety of puppets with 1st grades. Paper bags puppets are easy...using the flat brown lunch bag type. We've done zoo animals...lots of possibilities for BIG appendages like ears and noses...we've also done clown faces when they study the circus...lots of color there! All this with scissors, glue, and the paper scrap box. We stress exaggeration and looking at the features that make each ani,mal (or clown or whatever) unique. There are lots of opportunities to learn different ways to make paper 3-dimensional. I also have made paper mache puppets with 1st grade. I have a pattern for the cloth body, and get parents to help trace and cut the cloth for bodies...then I send them home with the kids to be stitched. Out of about 110 kids, I usually only have to do a couple on my machine at home...there's always some mom who offers to do extras for the kids who can't get anyone at home to help them. The head is pretty simple....we take one large (whole-2page) sheet of newspaper
      and tear it in half. (or I sometimes cut the sheets and give each child 2 half-sheets) One half is rolled up in a ball and taped to stay that way...the other half is folded in half (starting with the natural fold half-way down the page) we continue folding in half 4 times (counting the original fold) so it looks like a flat ruler..then tape to stay. Now each child should have a "ball", a "ruler" and I give them each 1/2 toilet paper tube (for the neck) They take the ruler and tape it around the ball until it just touches itself (now their contraption should look like a letter "P") then the "P" sits on top of the tube and the remaining straight piece of newspaper is taped tight to the tube...viola! a puppet head! This is then covered with several layers of paper mache...if you're using wheat paste, 2 layers will do, but if you're using Elmer's art paste (the clear stuff my bigger kids call "elephant snot", you'll need 3 or 4 layers. This method can be used for just about any
      grade level, with adaptations for the skill level of students...my bigger kids can build up noses, and really change the shape of the head with additions, but for 1st grade, we keep it pretty simple. I like to read "The Velveteen Rabbit", and they all bring their special stuffed toy to class. Then we can make "rabbit" puppets with floppy felt ears, or they can make their own animal. When all the painting and decorating is done, with pipecleaner whiskers, button eyes and noses etc.,the bodies are glued to the heads, and we use lace, felt, or yarn to cover the glued area on the neck. Hope this helps!

      candice carole <candicecarole@...> wrote:hi all -

      I'm looking for a few new ideas for puppet making with first graders. I have
      a few plans up my sleeve, but if anyone has any new ideas they'd be willing
      to share - I'd appreciate it greatly. I'm looking for something impressive,
      different, unique, and possibly unusual - or even just something that's sure
      to work well. I'll be teaching an eight week residency, so there is plenty
      of room for imagination. If anyone out ther has and ideas, resources,
      lessons, or projects - I'd love it if you could share.

      thanks so much!
      -candice



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    • mrg@whyart.com
      I ve used puppet making in a couple of ways. One is simple: divide the class into small groups and have them create stick puppets out of tongue depressors,
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 24, 2007
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        I've used puppet making in a couple of ways. One is simple: divide the class into small groups and have them create stick puppets out of tongue depressors, popsicle sticks, oaktag, cloth and more. Each group creates an original mini-play based upon artist(s) as character(s) and each group presents a performance to the class. Research added to previous knowledge combined with age appropriate humor help make the project adaptable for multiple age groups.
        The second option is to have the entire class create puppets which interact in a single original play, then have the class perform the play for a younger audience. This helps the middle schoolers and jr high citizens to participate while preserving their reps. Plus, they get to experience/be seen as role models/mentors to the younger set.
         
        lt's a fun activity; enjoy!

        Michael Gerrish
        www.WhyART.com
        "Transforming Education Through Art"
      • Jennifer Freck
        Thanks Michael! This will work really will with my older kids...I will try it for sure. Fantastic opportunity to weave in a lot of disciplines. Jenna
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 24, 2007
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          Thanks Michael!  This will work really will with my older kids...I will try it for sure.  Fantastic opportunity to weave in a lot of disciplines.  
          Jenna
          On Apr 24, 2007, at 12:50 PM, mrg@... wrote:


          I've used puppet making in a couple of ways. One is simple: divide the class into small groups and have them create stick puppets out of tongue depressors, popsicle sticks, oaktag, cloth and more. Each group creates an original mini-play based upon artist(s) as character(s) and each group presents a performance to the class. Research added to previous knowledge combined with age appropriate humor help make the project adaptable for multiple age groups.
          The second option is to have the entire class create puppets which interact in a single original play, then have the class perform the play for a younger audience. This helps the middle schoolers and jr high citizens to participate while preserving their reps. Plus, they get to experience/be seen as role models/mentors to the younger set.
           
          lt's a fun activity; enjoy!

          Michael Gerrish
          www.WhyART.com
          "Transforming Education Through Art"


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