Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

SLAB BOX HELP

Expand Messages
  • octopi77@aol.com
    Hello and Happy New Year I am busy during this break trying to finish the examples for the projects that my students are working on in their art classes. For
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 28 4:58 PM
      Hello and Happy New Year

      I am busy during this break trying to finish the examples for the projects
      that my students are working on in their art classes.

      For my sixth grade class I wanted to do slab boxes. Eventually the boxes
      were to be cut away and surrealistic scenes created on each of the walls.

      The problem is that the slabs were being rolled out too thin, some students
      over soaked their paper towels, and other students formed what looked like a
      box and it just began to cave in.

      This class meets only on Fridays and due to the holidays and interruptions in
      our schedule this project feels very nightmarish.

      I have thought of students just making a simple tile and considering this
      just a learning experience for all of us.

      Please help if you can.

      Thanks

      Carol


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jenny Watlington
      A recent teacher taught me that when rolling slabs for construction you can cut tar paper templates and roll that on top of your slab and cut around it. I
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 28 6:39 PM
        A recent teacher taught me that when rolling slabs for construction you can
        cut tar paper templates and roll that on top of your slab and cut around it.
        I think you roll the slabs with the templates attached and put box together
        the same day.

        To roll regular thickness slabs you can use paint stirrers glued together to
        make "blocks" to roll either end of your rolling tool. For example, I could
        glue three sticks together (flat ways) and then another set of three and
        then use those underneath the edges of my roller so that the slab is even
        1/4 or 3/8' or whatever.


        Good luck,

        Peter
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <octopi77@...>
        To: <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, December 28, 2004 7:58 PM
        Subject: [art_education] SLAB BOX HELP


        >
        > Hello and Happy New Year
        >
        > I am busy during this break trying to finish the examples for the projects
        > that my students are working on in their art classes.
        >
        > For my sixth grade class I wanted to do slab boxes. Eventually the boxes
        > were to be cut away and surrealistic scenes created on each of the walls.
        >
        > The problem is that the slabs were being rolled out too thin, some
        > students
        > over soaked their paper towels, and other students formed what looked like
        > a
        > box and it just began to cave in.
        >
        > This class meets only on Fridays and due to the holidays and interruptions
        > in
        > our schedule this project feels very nightmarish.
        >
        > I have thought of students just making a simple tile and considering this
        > just a learning experience for all of us.
        >
        > Please help if you can.
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        > Carol
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Michele O'Brien
        I use discontinued tiles from a local carpet/tile store that we set on each side of the clay when rolling it out (exact same tile on each side). The rolling
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 29 7:26 AM
          I use discontinued tiles from a local carpet/tile store that we set on each
          side of the clay when rolling it out (exact same tile on each side). The
          rolling pin should touch the tiles on each end , this way when the clay is
          rolled out flat, the slab will be the same thickness of the tiles (which is
          a sturdy wall) and all the sides will be the same. You should allow the
          slabs to become leather hard prior to slipping and scoring the sides to
          attach into the box (cube) shape this gives them more stability as does a
          weld (coil of clay pressed into the seam) on each joint. Good Luck!
        • Charlot Cassar
          Hi Carol And happy new year to you too! Slab pots can be a taxing exerice with kids, especially if you have a lot of them and only see them once a week. I
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 3, 2005
            Hi Carol

            And happy new year to you too!

            Slab pots can be a taxing exerice with kids, especially if you have a lot of
            them and only see them once a week. I would go with your suggestion and have
            them decorate a tile instead. Any remaining clay slabs could be used for
            some other exerice. Have the kids cut the slabs up (as if they were tearing
            paper), press patterns in the clay, and then build some kind of vase or bowl
            by sticking the bits of clay together. They could also cut out shapes to
            stick on the tile.

            In the future, if you are really thinking in terms of slab pots, I would
            have pieces of wood to use as guides for the thickness!

            Charlot

            -----Original Message-----
            From: octopi77@... [mailto:octopi77@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2004 1:58 AM
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [art_education] SLAB BOX HELP



            Hello and Happy New Year

            I am busy during this break trying to finish the examples for the projects
            that my students are working on in their art classes.

            For my sixth grade class I wanted to do slab boxes. Eventually the boxes
            were to be cut away and surrealistic scenes created on each of the walls.

            The problem is that the slabs were being rolled out too thin, some students
            over soaked their paper towels, and other students formed what looked like a
            box and it just began to cave in.

            This class meets only on Fridays and due to the holidays and interruptions
            in
            our schedule this project feels very nightmarish.

            I have thought of students just making a simple tile and considering this
            just a learning experience for all of us.

            Please help if you can.

            Thanks

            Carol


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            Yahoo! Groups Links
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.