Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

History of Bookmaking Class Puzzle - timeline (PowerPoint)

Expand Messages
  • Judy Decker
    Greetings Art Educators, Kathleen Arola shared this PowerPoint she created for her bookmaking unit: History of Bookmaking - Puzzle Timeline:
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 2, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings Art Educators,

      Kathleen Arola shared this PowerPoint she created for her bookmaking unit:
      History of Bookmaking - Puzzle Timeline:
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/Files/book.ppt

      You can save the file to your hard drive and play with it. It could also be
      a lesson in font styles too - Notice that Kathleen has chosen a different
      font for each slide. You can play with colors, too. Have fun with it this
      summer. I will not leave this online for long - so grab it now.

      Thanks Kathleen!

      Judy Decker - Ohio
      Incredible Art Department
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
      Incredible Art Resources
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
    • Victoria Patterson
      Hi Judy, Here s another organizational tip for art classrooms: The numbering idea is great, however my elementary classes are large and I see 500 students
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 12, 2004
      • 0 Attachment


        Hi Judy,

        Here's another organizational tip for art classrooms: The numbering idea is great, however my elementary classes are large and I see 500 students every week, so I find the numbering system a little tedious, especially when most of my materials must be shared.  For my elementary art room, I've found a color coding system works very well. Each table is assigned a  name from the color wheel, and materials are placed in "supply boxes" marked with each of the colors. Glue, scissors, and pencils are standard supplies in the boxes. I've also found large plastic trays in the primary and secondary colors to use for markers, or other piece materials. Folding a piece of  12 x 18 construction paper in half serves as a folder for 2-D work of any size. We have often had classes over 30 students, and passing out unfinished art work was taking too much class time. With the folders, passing things out takes about 1 minute, the kids all find their own work in the folder, and work begins. Each table "group" is responsible to keep their supplies in good shape for other classes. 3-D work is marked in a similar way with color coded name tags. When passing out 3-D work, each child gets out one piece of art work (not necessarily their own) and delivers it to the "table color" on the tag. Every piece is "delivered" in a very short time, and work begins.


        Do you Yahoo!?
        New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages!
      • Judy Decker
        Thanks Victoria, This method works very well for younger students.... I subbed a lot for a teacher who had those tool totes on each table. In the totes were
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 12, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks Victoria,

          This method works very well for younger students.... I subbed a lot for a
          teacher who had those tool totes on each table. In the totes were all of the
          basic supplies Elementary uses (crayons, markers, container of erasers, can
          of pencils, scissors and glue bottles - enough for each kid at the table).
          She had tempera paints and water color paints set up on a supply table at
          all times - so it was very easy for her to switch to different media. One
          tip that she did was make a poster of what the tote tray should look like -
          nearly organized at the end of each class so kids could easily check
          supplies. The only problem she had was the "usual" eraser problem
          (mysteriously getting crumbled into little pieces). She just made sure she
          had an adequate supply to replace them. When they were doing 3-D or
          painting - the kids set the tote trays under the table. Clean-up was a
          breeze.

          I had those long pencil boxes for middle school (so I could put rulers in
          them too). We counted everything at the end of the class period. I just put
          in them what we needed at the time. They weren't big enough for marker sets.
          The Sanford markers - 12 color sets - were easy to check thought to see if
          all were there.

          Cardboard cheese boxes from the cafeteria a nice freebie to use for
          organizing table supplies.

          Have plenty of Zip lock bags on hand.

          Judy

          On 7/12/2004 9:39:33 AM, art_education@yahoogroups.com wrote:
          > Hi Judy,
          ....... For my elementary art room, I've
          > found a color coding system works very well. Each table is assigned a
          > name from the color wheel, and materials are placed in "supply boxes"
          > marked with each of the colors. Glue, scissors, and pencils are standard
          > supplies in the boxes. ......
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.