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Copyright links - FYI

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  • Judy Decker
    Dear Art Educators, Not too long ago I posted my recollection of copyright fair use guidelines for educators in multimedia presentations. I was right - but
    Message 1 of 2 , May 5, 2004
      Dear Art Educators,

      Not too long ago I posted my recollection of copyright "fair use" guidelines
      for educators in multimedia presentations. I was right - but thought I would
      give you the links that back up what I posted. I meant to check on them
      sooner for you.

      Nice - concise - easy to follow guidelines
      http://www.umuc.edu/library/copy.html
      This has a link to a sample permission to use letter.

      Guidelines for Multimedia presentations:
      http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/ccmcguid.htm
      Here is the actual language (might be same as above link):
      http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/guidelines.html
      Complete Copyright text/pdf:
      http://www.copyright.gov/title17/

      I will save this in case the topic comes up again. I am still writing
      contemporary artists to get permission that I LINK to IAD or my site. If my
      post does not give you where the artist is linked - then it is your
      responsibility to get permission if you want to use more than five images
      (five falls under fair use --and you have up to two years to use those
      images).
      All artists do want to be given credit and have their work listed as
      copyrighted in your PowerPoint presentations. Artists I have asked give you
      permission beyond the two year limit and five images limit. I have not
      emailed any museums - only the new contemporary artists. In general - images
      that are linked on Web Museum (but that can be tricky too - some artworks
      are blocked from viewing), Mark Harden's Artchive and Carol Gerten's are
      safe for you to use in PowerPoint without getting permission (selling your
      presentation is another story). Carol has removed images that were not
      permitted. When my students did their "Know the Artist" pages - I got
      permission from all of the main image resources online at the time (and one
      main poster shop). Students wrote to individual sites.

      Basically the only "fair use" cases that have come into question are when
      the creator of the media then went to sell the copied material. Always - if
      in doubt - get permission - always assume work is copyrighted. Don't assume
      that if you find an image on a site - that the creator of that site got
      permission to use it.

      Hope this helps those "gray areas",

      Judy Decker - Ohio
      Incredible Art Department
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
      Incredible Art Resources
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

      P.S. Admittedly - very few of my PowerPoint followed the letter of the
      law.... My school was not very copyright conscious....We were all encouraged
      time and time again to violate the law. I do not know what their policies
      are now. I did tell my students what was wrong with my PowerPoints when I
      showed them. That was the best I could do with the time I had available.
    • henlaojim
      ... guidelines ... thought I would ... them ... This would appear to not be applicable to freely distributed web based imagery when used i the course of AV
      Message 2 of 2 , May 5, 2004
        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Judy Decker" <JDecker@w...>
        wrote:
        > Dear Art Educators,
        >
        > Not too long ago I posted my recollection of copyright "fair use"
        guidelines
        > for educators in multimedia presentations. I was right - but
        thought I would
        > give you the links that back up what I posted. I meant to check on
        them
        > sooner for you.
        >
        > Nice - concise - easy to follow guidelines
        > http://www.umuc.edu/library/copy.html
        >

        This would appear to not be applicable to freely distributed web
        based imagery when used i the course of AV presentaitions on such
        subjects as art history. Note that all ovf this refernces
        reproductions of works, not the use of works that are otherwise
        freely and publicly distributed, nor does it reference the giving of
        students the links to web pagesthat they might be required to use.
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