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Blogs in the art room

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  • catyo55
    Hi there, I m in need of some advice. I ve had my HS ceramics students blogging this past year. They write once per week as a reflection of what they have
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 5, 2014
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      Hi there,


      I'm in need of some advice.  I've had my HS ceramics students blogging this past year.  They write once per week as a reflection of what they have accomplished and what they hope to accomplish in the future.  For the most part, the reflection part of the blog idea has been very successful as a sort of online journal process.

       

      I'd like the blogs to be a bit more interactive and communicative for the students though...  like maybe I'm not the only one reading them all year long!! ;)  Does anyone have suggestions for a good way to do this?  Should I have them choose 3 blogs to follow all year long?  Make a blogfeed of everyone's blogs and then read when they have a chance?  Require them to comment on x number of blogs per week/month?  How would I even begin to check for that? I have roughly 50 students and I don't want to overwhelm them with blog reading requirements... more like something that takes 20-30 minutes per week at home.


      My students use weebly (here's an example: http://amyleeceramics.weebly.com/ceramics-blog )which I like because it's fairly intuitive, they can post from their smartphones, it's free, and it allows them to combine the blog with their class portfolio.  I'm open to other suggestions though.


      What do you think?  Do you blog in your classroom?  Any ideas for me?


      Thanks


    • kenroar
      You didn t say what platform your blogs are on but if you are doing them on regular web pages that students design, you can create a comments section at the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 6, 2014
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        You didn't say what platform your blogs are on but if you are doing them on regular web pages that students design, you can create a comments section at the bottom of each page using Intense Debate. A college student who has appeared as a tech specialist in Canada recommended that to me and it has been pretty successful. Some page have many, many comments and some interaction.

        You can get Intense Debate here: http://intensedebate.com

        You can see a sample of comments and discussions on IAD at Symbolism of Color: Using Color for Meaning

        I have been told by professional bloggers that if you want your blogs to show up in a Google search, you should post at least one new entry a week. It sounds like you already have your students doing this. If you are requiring that they comment to get credit, they will need to follow more than three because there is a good chance that there isn't much to comment on. The blog post of the blog they're following may be uninteresting. Just an idea... perhaps if you allow them to follow as many blogs as they wish and then keep track of blogs they post comments on, they would have no problem finding something to say.

        Ken

         




        ---In art_education@yahoogroups.com, <cjoneal5@...> wrote :

        Hi there,


        I'm in need of some advice.  I've had my HS ceramics students blogging this past year.  They write once per week as a reflection of what they have accomplished and what they hope to accomplish in the future.  For the most part, the reflection part of the blog idea has been very successful as a sort of online journal process.

         

        I'd like the blogs to be a bit more interactive and communicative for the students though...  like maybe I'm not the only one reading them all year long!! ;)  Does anyone have suggestions for a good way to do this?  Should I have them choose 3 blogs to follow all year long?  Make a blogfeed of everyone's blogs and then read when they have a chance?  Require them to comment on x number of blogs per week/month?  How would I even begin to check for that? I have roughly 50 students and I don't want to overwhelm them with blog reading requirements... more like something that takes 20-30 minutes per week at home.


        My students use weebly (here's an example: http://amyleeceramics.weebly.com/ceramics-blog )which I like because it's fairly intuitive, they can post from their smartphones, it's free, and it allows them to combine the blog with their class portfolio.  I'm open to other suggestions though.


        What do you think?  Do you blog in your classroom?  Any ideas for me?


        Thanks


      • Katrina Barge
        I would use a wiki page, you could post a prompt and all the kids could write and comment on each other s. Might promote some good communication. Katrina On
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 6, 2014
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          I would use a wiki page, you could post a prompt and all the kids could write and comment on each other's. Might promote some good communication.
          Katrina

          On Jun 6, 2014 2:18 AM, "cjoneal5@... [art_education]" <art_education@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
           

          Hi there,


          I'm in need of some advice.  I've had my HS ceramics students blogging this past year.  They write once per week as a reflection of what they have accomplished and what they hope to accomplish in the future.  For the most part, the reflection part of the blog idea has been very successful as a sort of online journal process.

           

          I'd like the blogs to be a bit more interactive and communicative for the students though...  like maybe I'm not the only one reading them all year long!! ;)  Does anyone have suggestions for a good way to do this?  Should I have them choose 3 blogs to follow all year long?  Make a blogfeed of everyone's blogs and then read when they have a chance?  Require them to comment on x number of blogs per week/month?  How would I even begin to check for that? I have roughly 50 students and I don't want to overwhelm them with blog reading requirements... more like something that takes 20-30 minutes per week at home.


          My students use weebly (here's an example: http://amyleeceramics.weebly.com/ceramics-blog )which I like because it's fairly intuitive, they can post from their smartphones, it's free, and it allows them to combine the blog with their class portfolio.  I'm open to other suggestions though.


          What do you think?  Do you blog in your classroom?  Any ideas for me?


          Thanks


        • catyo55
          Thanks for the advice! I ll start messing around with Intense Debate and a wiki platform to see what might work best for my students.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 9, 2014
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            Thanks for the advice!  I'll start messing around with Intense Debate and a wiki platform to see what might work best for my students.
          • bergiemoore
            My daughter had a discussion board for her online math class. It was set up so that everyone had to post by Wednesday on that week s theme or question, and
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 11, 2014
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              My daughter had a discussion board for her online math class. It was set up so that everyone had to post by Wednesday on that week's theme or question, and then reply by Saturday. 
                   To keep this assignment at or around 20-30 minutes, perhaps you could make it a every other week switch- they post their original comments by the first and third Wednesday of the month, and they have to make a reply- by linking the post they are reflecting on to their blog- on the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month.  That has them posting just once a week and being able to allow you to easily keep track of replies on people blogs- because they will be posting it to their site- so movement on the site by each Wednesday probably means they did their job which makes it a little easier on you during very busy times in the year. 

               I would create a rubric that broke down the posting & especially the reply guidelines very specifically into what you want, or it seems to me, "I like it because it's so pretty" might be a routine response from beginning artists.  When I had my yearbook students blogging for their digital camera portion of the class, they had to comment on the assignment's purpose, as if they were using the piece to teach someone; someone who only followed their blog and let that reader know what we were doing and why this piece was exceptional or missed the mark.  It helped make the assignment a little longer and gave the students an easy target to hit.   I asked for composition analysis and 1/3 rule evaluation (once that topic was taught), emotional effect of the piece (what it made the blogger feel when they looked at it. 2 sentences on "feels" were worth full points in that area.)  and purpose of the assignment- cropping, overlapping, whatever the skill was were were working on.  I thought once about having the students grade each other's blog based on my rubric, but we never found time in  class.  Maybe that could be a homework assignment once or twice in the year? 
               
              I agree with Ken, you should follow a minimum of 3 blogs.   
              Brandy
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