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Do you really need an art degree?

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  • kenroar
    UK artist and owner Richard McMunn discusses if you really need an art degree in various art fields: http://www.incredibleart.org/news/issues/artdegrees.html
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 19, 2013
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      UK artist and owner Richard McMunn discusses if you really need an art degree in various art fields:

      http://www.incredibleart.org/news/issues/artdegrees.html

      (Yahoo loves to add spaces in URL's. If the link doesn't work, remove the spaces in the URL)

      Ken
    • kamla_rk
      If you are gifted and have the talent, the degree just gives you a recognition....nothing more.there are a lot of school dropouts who are doing extremely well
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 20, 2013
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        If you are gifted and have the talent, the degree just gives you a recognition....nothing more.there are a lot of school dropouts who are doing extremely well for themselves.

        Kamla
        Chennai,India
      • deskilfeather
        It is a real shame that the world is loosing touch with the importance of education as opposed to training for a job. Education is for everybody in this
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 22, 2013
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          It is a real shame that the world is loosing touch with the importance of "education" as opposed to training for a job. Education is for everybody in this world, a cultural right. As an oldie, in my day, employers trained their staff for the job and did not expect schools and universities to do that for them. With some exceptions such as accounting and the law. I hope that education for the sake of education regains its status in our world, we are much the poorer without it.


          Des

        • MaryAnn Kohl
          Des, I am also of the mind that education is the important factor, and one I m sorry to say society is losing touch with. When I talk to high school teens who
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 22, 2013
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            Des, I am also of the mind that education is the important factor, and one I'm sorry to say society is losing touch with. When I talk to high school teens who are debating college or other venues of career beginnings, I ask, "Do you want to be educated in breadth and depth, or do you want career training, or both?" Their answer determines how they might proceed. 
            ....................................
            MaryAnn F. Kohl
            ....................................
            29th Anniversary 1985-2014

            On Dec 22, 2013, at 8:26 AM, <deskilfeather@...> wrote:

             

            It is a real shame that the world is loosing touch with the importance of "education" as opposed to training for a job. Education is for everybody in this world, a cultural right. As an oldie, in my day, employers trained their staff for the job and did not expect schools and universities to do that for them. With some exceptions such as accounting and the law. I hope that education for the sake of education regains its status in our world, we are much the poorer without it.


            Des 


          • bergiemoore
            A liberal arts education is fabulous thing- if you can afford it. As much as I value the general education I received as an undergraduate (art & psych double
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 22, 2013
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              A liberal arts education is fabulous thing- if you can afford it.  As much as I value the general education I received as an undergraduate (art & psych double major with a minor in African Studies), the price I paid, and continue to pay, for that degree was an unwise investment in my future.  I would have the jobs I hold today, resource art & technology teacher at three different private schools, whether I held college debt or not. I do not need a teaching degree (which I don't hold) or even the bachelor's degree to be a resource teacher. 

                   I will be paying for my degree as my oldest goes off to college. If my youngest finishes his schooling in 4 years, I will pay for my own Bachelor's degree as I pay for of my kid's bachelor's degrees!  It's very hard for me to say how having my education benefits me, but I can tell you in hard numbers how it has affected my ability buy a home or even get car loans.    

                   Our world is changing, and the adage of a college education as the gate way to prosperity was shut long before most of us showed up.   I tell my students who want to become professional artist, not to go a 4 year school for it. It's just not worth it. 

              Just my two cents, 

              Brandy


                    



              ---In art_education@yahoogroups.com, <deskilfeather@...> wrote:

              ... Education is for everybody in this world, a cultural right.... I hope that education for the sake of education regains its status in our world, we are much the poorer without it.


              Des

            • numinousart4life
              well in a lot of US schools, the degree and degrees give you higher pay grades too. :)
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 22, 2013
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                well in a lot of US schools, the degree and degrees give you higher pay grades too. :)

              • numinousart4life
                I have really enjoyed the replies on the value of “education.” – and I have to admit that I have had a paradigm shift in my thinking about how college
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 22, 2013
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                  I have really enjoyed the replies on the value of “education.” – and I have to admit that I have had a paradigm shift in my thinking about how college degrees align for different folks  – I am still processing much with my expanding view – but people are so different – and so are schools and the way they grade!!  – And we really cannot make universal claims with Higher Ed (IMO).


                  I like how Maryann noted the difference between career training or the overall depth and breadth – and how Kamla noted that many dropouts are doing “extremely well” without a degree - and how Des noted the RICHNESS that comes from Education for the sake of Education - with benefits to individuals AND society in general! Oh, and enjoyed Brandy’s reply, which highlights so much, and how her personal story of the ongoing cost of her degree is prime example of how tuition is out of balance with reality!!


                   

                  I agree that a well-rounded liberal arts education is just really great for all human beings – but as noted, I am not sure as to what subjects should be required and at what age (or grade) we should stop mandating “general Ed” courses!  Hmmm



                  ~~~~~~

                  However, I think that the original post was relating to ART degrees: “Do you need an ART degree – to work in various ART fields.” 

                   

                  And in the link that Ken posted, – and while I found the article lacking in a couple areas, the authors suggest that artists CAN benefit from a Visual Arts degree - noting that artists “have a reputation to be flighty and do their own thing” and so an art degree can help artists show “future employers that you are dedicated enough to keep going and finish what you start. You will also have developed skills that people who did not go to university will be lacking. You will have a more rounded approach to each project you attempt.”

                   

                  ~~~~

                   

                  We all know that NOT everyone with a “degree” ends up being well rounded (some have little take away) while others who have NO degree sometimes end up with well-roundedness, depth and all that (especially if they have a passion for life learning and growth).

                   

                  And when it comes to teaching art….

                  not everyone that gets a teaching degree is cut out to teach!  I once heard a mom asking about the credentials of one of her child's art teachers -  and she wanted to know if the teacher/artist had ever sold any of his pieces – because to this lady – the sales of certain works equated with more success and talent.  Well it may reflect more personal talent for making pieces that sell – or maybe he just priced things to sell – lol – but personal success as an artist usually does not mean that person is going to be a good teacher who can teach art – and in my experience, I have seen professional artists leave Education jobs because they were not cut out to teach – so closing thought – just because we have a degree or credential in any area, it does not mean the talent, skill, or gifting will be there for that area.  It really depends on the individual wiring!


                  ~Yvette 

                • deskilfeather
                  This, (nicomachean ethics inspired), link refers to the fundamental mistake of making students pay for education and dramatic increases of student fees in the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 23, 2013
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                    This, (nicomachean ethics inspired), link refers to the fundamental mistake of making students pay for education and dramatic increases of student fees in the UK. Education is a right and students should not be burdened with a lifetime of debt because of their studies. The current UK government tries to justify student debt with the statement that if earning never reach a minimum standard then the debt need never be paid back. But officialdom fails to acknowledge the psychological effect that long term debt has on the individual.


                    If I may?  http://www.flickr.com/photos/28880384@N06/5225716925/


                    Des

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