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New art lesson

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  • Ken
    A new middle school art lesson has been added to IAD called Line, Color and Movement. It is a pastel lesson and it can be found on:
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 23, 2013
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      A new middle school art lesson has been added to IAD called Line, Color and Movement. It is a pastel lesson and it can be found on:

      http://www.incredibleart.org/lessons/middle/rodriguez.html

      Ken
    • reenshannon
      I m starting an afterschool art club, 6th-8th graders, never done it before, any advice? Reen Shannon
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 23, 2013
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        I'm starting an afterschool art club, 6th-8th graders, never done it
        before, any advice?
        Reen Shannon
      • Lynch, Jamie
        I have an art club with younger students but I have them create large pieces to display within our school system....they do not go home with them....I rotate
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 24, 2013
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          I have an art club with younger students but I have them create large pieces to display within our school system....they do not go home with them....I rotate and use them each year.
           
          Last month we created large owls out of recycled paper and cardboard, painted paper, etc....They are awesomely hanging up in my art room!  they will stay until I rotate to another area.
           
          Some of these owls are hanging up in another school where I teach. Kids/parents/teachers love them.
           
          Often times I create a bulletin board or hang  things from the ceilings...it brings an overall sense of advocacy....Everybody loves it...(It takes a village)
           
          Creatively,
           
          jamie


          On Mon, Sep 23, 2013 at 5:35 PM, <reens@...> wrote:
           

          I'm starting an afterschool art club, 6th-8th graders, never done it
          before, any advice?
          Reen Shannon


        • numinousart4life
          Regarding after school art club: ~Have some sort of goal or project to work towards for the end of the year. ~ Ask yourself what is something you would have
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 25, 2013
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            Regarding after school art club:


            ~Have some sort of goal or project to work towards for the end of the year. 

            ~ Ask yourself what is something you would have wanted if you walked into a class or club at their age?  


            ~Ask yourself - after art club this year - what are the five main things I want the kids to take with them - then write those down and design plans around that. Do not have too many objectives because then the club loses the fun, informal feel - but just a handful of objectives can guide the planning. 


            ~ Plan something for each meeting - but then allow for changes - especially as you read the children and see what unfolds with student interest. Or you can talk about a current event - like did an art piece just sell for record breaking amounts? Sometimes you have kids with low energy - but then other times you have a creative bunch that is full of ideas - and when that come sup - try to roll with the energy of the class. 


            ~Have an initial group discussion and probe the group to find out interests.  I know one art teacher's art club had kids that all wanted to do jewelry-making one year - and then they sold some of the pieces at a fundraiser. I never cared for jewelry making, but for us - had a 4th/5th grade club that really wanted to make polymer clay pieces so we did that (owls and snails are easy starters).  But it can also be a time to introduce oils or gouache (if the right group) - so take a survey at the start and keep an eye out for what the kids want and then meet in the middle.  If you can, target a few things from their list with what you are able to do.  Oh, and the art teacher that sold the art club jewelry also modeled servant minded thinking, entrepreneurial skills, and each student was allowed to have a few pieces (made great holiday gifts).  So keep in mind that projects and outreach are fun and layered with life lessons. 



            ~ Be sure to offer a couple of really special things that make it worth their time for coming.  I once found an old terms sheet with the EOA -(I bet it likely had a carbon copy with the original) but it was so old school and just cool (and my enthusiasm about it made the kids like it even more lol) and so I made copies just for art club - and it was special because it was only given to them. We talked about it - talked about generational differences - this led to art movements and then to specific artists who had different periods in their works. 

            Another time we talked about society and art - like how Rousseau and his art were not easily accepted (and he was often mede fun of) - and one day we read an article about the Impressionists and how the Franco-Purssian War may have impacted their work (or not). 

            But the worse thing for students is to join a club and then feel like it is a waste of their time. So give them a few exclusive goodies....and sometimes talking with the teacher is the most special take away. 



            ~Also, make it your aim to sit down and enjoy the club.  Make it refreshing for you so it does not end up pulling from you more.  You can only give so much in a school year - and the clubs, meetings, events and all those meaningful little extras can take a toll on our freshness and essence.  So be determined to make art club win-win for YOU.  For me - after standing and running around all day win-win would involve getting off my feet!

             So that is why I set up a station to have "art talks" -  we would sit down -sometimes have snacks - and just TALK ART! Of course the kids could be sketching or making underdrawings during the talk - or conditioning clay pieces - but the little talk times now are some of my most cherished memories. This also gave the students a chance to share and reflect - which pulled less from me as well and gave my voice a rest. (I have many new ideas since I used to do this - like you can use art cards for discussion starters - or use copies of masterpieces for art criticism - which can be pulled up on an iPad and discussed - or they have artist apps now - just so much to consider!!) 


            ~You can have themed meetings.  Like if the club meets weekly - connect it to the season or current events.  October is a great time for an apple party - which has a plethora of possibilities that can align with a variety of resources and interest - and apply party lessons can be tied to still life themes.   Or think if there is a holiday - or local party - you can connect with that. 


            ~Under promise - over deliver. 

             Be very careful as to what you offer students.  At the start of the year it may be easy to say we will do this and that - but as things get buys you really may need some wiggle room.  And well, while it is crucial to have goals - but do not have too much of an outline or the demands will feel like teaching another class - and you just do not need to add that much more to your teaching schedule (or maybe you do - guess it depends, but I think most of us need to leave MORE margins so by the end of the year we are not completely wiped). 

             So offer some fun vision for the club - but do not promise too much in the area of projects (also because sometimes the discussion and other things that we can intimately give through a club trumps all of that big project stuff anyhow).  And so by NOT over promising - you can also leave some wiggle room for changes - changes that align with your wants, needs, resources, kids' needs and all that.


            Here a are a few things I would do for art club:


            **Fabric art of some sort - something the kids can paint, sew or add graphics to - and then have it for years to come as an art club show piece. 

             **A Chinese discussion party. Set up the room with 5 or 6 small art pieces - and then have tea (or apple juice) and sip and talk about the pieces. Using Easy Art Criticism sheets the kids can use EOA to talk about works and then share what they would buy - etc. 

            ** Make this the time to use kits or supplies that you cannot use with bigger classes. i.e. A Pysanka egg decorating kit or sumi brush set

            ** Talk about the working artist and look up local ones on the internet - write the artist - or buy a piece for the school -or create an art piece in that artist's style.  We did this with a local artist named Ramel Jasir and it was fun!


            http://rameljasirart.com



            **Integrate other subjects.  Try poetry and art - science and art - oh, and an example from here in Virginia (where it is always 1860 some place - ha ) we honor certain battles - and so the anniversary dates for those could be times to combine history and art. 


            Best wishes with your club -and remember to keep it working for you first and foremost - because a fresh teacher is a fun teacher to be around. 


            ~Yvette 



            ---In art_education@yahoogroups.com, <reens@...> wrote:

            I'm starting an afterschool art club, 6th-8th graders, never done it
            before, any advice?
            Reen Shannon
          • bergiemoore
            I would separate out the art club from art class. They should be two distinct entities and have different missions and goals. I think it s a mistake to make
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 25, 2013
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               I would separate out the art club from art class. They should be two distinct entities and have different missions and goals. I think it's a mistake to make art club, "art class 2.0".  I like Jamie's idea of large group projects that can be rotated or moved around. 

                  I was in one art club in middle school, and we were the catch all for master pieces needing completion :)- the school was having a play, we did the background. The school was having a mascot day, we made the 7 foot Dragon.  It seemed to me that that's where my art teacher got the budget for our projects, by relying on funds from whoever had requested the stuff get made.  I heard her turning down a potential project because there were no funds being given to us for the large scale mural they were requesting. 

                 In comparison, we had a rather lame high school art club. The art teacher said we could have one, but then there was no direction. She just let us hang out, which was ok, but we didn't have any projects, goals or art competitions we were trying for.  We managed to do just one significant thing all year, and that was my prodding.  It dissolved immediately after that project was done about 3/4 through the year. So I recommend that you set goals for the students, preferably asking them first but filling in where they come up blank, and create fun projects they wouldn't have in class with realistic completion dates.

              It sounds obvious- "you should do stuff", but when the projects  mean something to the great student body and the artists can get recognition from peers and teachers in the school, I think it elevates the artists' time and energy and promotes your club positively. 

              Good luck!

              Brandy



              ---In art_education@yahoogroups.com, <reens@...> wrote:

              I'm starting an afterschool art club, 6th-8th graders, never done it
              before, any advice?
              Reen Shannon
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