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Re: [art_education] Re: Lesson plans?

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  • Jennifer Barthmus
    Thank you for your response! That is the way I would like to do it. I have been out of teaching for 6 years and before we followed the Sunshine Standards and
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 21, 2013
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      Thank you for your response!
      That is the way I would like to do it. I have been out of teaching for 6 years and before we followed the Sunshine Standards and had unit and lesson plans online we could use. Now I need to go by media bc I'm doing art on a cart but with no cart...there are stairs involved so I'm thinking I'd use a tray. I'm thinking I can only carry around one set of materials for all the grades. It is a very small private school and I will have every K-5 class 2x a week for 45 minutes.
      What are some of your favorite lesson plans that go over well with most kids that you have taught?
      Jennifer

      From: tabchoiceteaching <TwoDucks@...>
      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 12:31 PM
      Subject: [art_education] Re: Lesson plans?
       


      --- In mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Barthmus <barthmusj@...> wrote:
      >
      > Where do you get your lesson plans from? Did you put together a unit plan for the year? I'm looking for K-5 ideas at a new school. How do you follow the standards?>>

      Hi Jennifer:

      What do you want your students to know and be able to do?

      How often do you see them in a year?

      Ideally, your students should have experiences in drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, 3D, fiber (and clay if you have it), every year.

      These experiences should be open ended so that you do not know exactly what the students will make--if you do, then you have done all the creative work for them and they are only following directions.

      So you have 6 or 7 areas of media to be addressed--if you see students once a week that is about 30 classes per year, allowing for holidays, field trips, etc.

      So given that, you have no more than 5 class periods to address each of the media. Then ask yourself: "If my students are going to paint only in this 5 week window, what is the MOST important thing they need to know and be able to do with paint? (perhaps, set up their materials, mix colors, experiment with brushes, make a finished painting of their choice?) And so on. That can easily take 5 class periods.

      The vocabulary, and complexity of the techniques will expand with the grades, ie., Kindergarten might do gadget prints, but by gr 4 or 5 they might be cutting foam blocks or pulling a squeegie for a silkscreen.

      If you form your thinking this way, it is relatively easy to make a year's plan for each grade--just make a big grid with media on one axis, grade level on the other. Vocabulary, concepts (transformation, for example), art history, and E/P must be folded in to those 5 week groups of lessons.

      I don't know which standards you are referencing--new things are coming but for now, the National Standards and my state's (Massachusetts) are easily embedded in to any good art lesson.

      That is how I did it before I moved to choice teaching. With choice, it is easier, but that is a different question and post.

      Best of luck!
      Keep it simple
      Trust your students
      Teach art, not projects

      Best wishes on the new school year!
      kathy douglas, k-4 retired, Massachusetts
      http://teachingforartisticbehavior.org

    • Connie
      Thanks for posting your response. As the visual arts coordinator, I plan to pass this along to our new elementary staff (and review for the veteran
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 22, 2013
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        Thanks for posting your response. As the visual arts coordinator, I plan to pass this along to our new elementary staff (and review for the veteran teachers)  Great summary!
        CONNIE
      • ednakate
        I use the state standards as a starting point. Most states have a list of content standards for visual arts. I also connect what is happening in the art room
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 22, 2013
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          I use the state standards as a starting point. Most states have a list of content standards for visual arts.
          I also connect what is happening in the art room with what is happening in the regular classroom. I ask the classroom teachers to tell me what they are teaching so we can link that lesson to a lesson in the art room. For example, K/1 is reading books by Henke, we do a lesson on birds. When 2nd grade is learning about insects, we do an Eric Carle inspired piece. If 5th is learning about nebulae, we create them in the art room.
          I also teach the elements of art (line, shape, form, value, color, etc.)
          When I was "art on a cart", I would coordinate the grade levels so that they all did the same medium on the same day so I would not have to go back and forth to the supply area.
          Best of luck,
          Alyssa




          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Barthmus <barthmusj@...> wrote:
          >
          > Where do you get your lesson plans from? Did you put together a unit plan for the year? I'm looking for K-5 ideas at a new school. How do you follow the standards?
          > Thanks,
          > Jennifer
          >
        • tabchoiceteaching
          ...
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 22, 2013
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            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Barthmus <barthmusj@...> wrote:

            << need to go by media bc I'm doing art on a cart but with no cart...there are stairs involved so I'm thinking I'd use a tray. I'm thinking I can only carry around one set of materials for all the grades.>>

            Jennifer--I was an art on a car teacher traveling to three towns back in the 1960's (yes) In my favor was one-story buildings. I recommend watercolors/tempera blocks for paint at the beginning. Collage, fiber, small sculptures (cardboard, small found objects)altered books, and of course drawing travel well. Sketchbooks would be easy to manage also, as students could keep them in their desks.

            My style is simple simple techniques that students can use to make personal art. One sequence of lessons (which were used to open centers, but could work to arrange media experiences) can be found here:

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/message/1072

            and here:

            http://teachingforartisticbehavior.org/tab-practice/opening-centers/

            And tonight there was a post on the TAB Yahoo list about art on a cart in general:

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/message/28241

            (The Yahoo group requires joining)

            Hope this little bit helps!
            kathy douglas
            http://teachingforartisticbehavior.org
          • Jennifer Barthmus
            I thought schools had money back in the 60 s?   Thank you so much! How do you figure out a plan for the year with regard to units considering it has to go by
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 26, 2013
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              I thought schools had money back in the 60's?
               
              Thank you so much! How do you figure out a plan for the year with regard to units considering it has to go by medium?
              Jennifer

              From: tabchoiceteaching <TwoDucks@...>
              To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 8:06 PM
              Subject: [art_education] Re: Lesson plans?
               


              --- In mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Barthmus <barthmusj@...> wrote:

              << need to go by media bc I'm doing art on a cart but with no cart...there are stairs involved so I'm thinking I'd use a tray. I'm thinking I can only carry around one set of materials for all the grades.>>

              Jennifer--I was an art on a car teacher traveling to three towns back in the 1960's (yes) In my favor was one-story buildings. I recommend watercolors/tempera blocks for paint at the beginning. Collage, fiber, small sculptures (cardboard, small found objects)altered books, and of course drawing travel well. Sketchbooks would be easy to manage also, as students could keep them in their desks.

              My style is simple simple techniques that students can use to make personal art. One sequence of lessons (which were used to open centers, but could work to arrange media experiences) can be found here:

              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/message/1072

              and here:

              http://teachingforartisticbehavior.org/tab-practice/opening-centers/

              And tonight there was a post on the TAB Yahoo list about art on a cart in general:

              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/message/28241

              (The Yahoo group requires joining)

              Hope this little bit helps!
              kathy douglas
              http://teachingforartisticbehavior.org/

            • Katherine Abrams
              For Jennifer - The units don t have to be by media. If your district has an art curriculum, use that. If your district is concentrating on 21st century skills
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 28, 2013
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                For Jennifer -

                The units don't have to be by media. If your district has an art curriculum, use that. If your district is concentrating on 21st century skills like critical thinking, so much the better. If your district doesn't have an art curriculum use the state's, if it is decent. The media is just the, well, medium, through which your students will understand, practice, and master the skills.

                For example, our state and district have objectives stating that students will understand how art reflects its culture and its time. This can be extended to show how art influences its culture and its time. I can choose from cultures around the world and throughout history to create units or individual lessons. Let's say I introduce Northwest Pacific Native Americans and Canadians ("First People") of the last 200 years (with a map, too). There are traditional works to show, like wooden masks and totem poles. There are contemporary artists like sculptor Bill Reid. There are visitors to the culture like Emily Carr. When I introduce the lesson I can ask students to think about living in the Pacific Northwest. Set the stage -- what is the countryside like? Trees, ocean. How will you live? What animals will be important? Students love to guess what animals might live in a Canadian Pacific forest. What do you think might be the purpose of this art? Later, students can identify elements and principles in the artwork. (This does not have to happen all in one session.) If you want, your Centers can include information on the artists. One unit can work for all grades, if you introduce sequential art skills in each and have different examples. Some schools "do" a culture a year -- the Renaissance, India, Mexico, etc. 

                So if the students choose sculpture, collage, painting, or drawing, it doesn't matter to the unit goals. If your curriculum emphasizes technical art skills, you can make that the demo and you will have to keep track of when students master the skills.

                Kathie Abrams
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