Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: What supplies do I need?

Expand Messages
  • Yvette
    I want to second the suggestion about having a basic list - but then also figuring out what you want to teach the kids - and getting items for those themes
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 26, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I want to second the suggestion about having a basic list - but then also figuring out "what you want to teach" the kids - and getting items for those themes and lessons. This may take teaching a year to really fine tune what you need, but loosely plan your lessons/themes and go from there. . When I first started out I loved the Masterpiece of the month book.
      Here are ten things I thought of, but keep in mind this is because it matches my lessons and the way I teach:

      1. Plenty of 11 x 17 heavy weight WHITE paper. This size paper is great for many projects. I could whip out any drawing or painting lesson with this paper as the base- (i.e. a Matisse water color with layered items; value and shading lessons; intro perspective; pastel abstracts; complementary color lessons with glue and construction paper; tessellations; landscape-cityscape-seascape; animal depiction, self- portraits etc.). And one year I actually had a parent keep every 11x17 we made – and she sewed them together at the end of the year and made a book.

      2. A lot of black paper (at least for me this is a must). A good supply of 8.5 x 11 acid free black paper (and 11 x 17) –can be used for mounting projects, making booklets, for chalk works w/ masking tape, for black & white projects, Mondrian paper grids, etc.

      3. Soft and hard pencils - a good amount of 2h pencils - but also some 5B (or any assortment) but when students are learning to draw certain things, a nice H pencil is easy to erase and does not smudge, but for shading and value, a nice 5B or 6B is key- I also have some nice graphite pencils that work well for grades 3 and up.
      Sometimes we have those cheap pencil sharpeners for kids and students grab them from a basket- so there is not a line with the class sharpener. If you have the space (and with under 100 kids you may be able to do this) you may want to have parents get each child their own pencil case with pencils, eraser, and sharpener – (but be specific on what they need to get or the extreme variations can cause probs).

      4. Plenty of acid free construction paper in many colors. I prefer 11 x 17 as it can be cut down. I do not keep any low quality construction paper in my supply closet- even if stacks of cheap construction paper are donated I prefer not to use this poor quality (even for practice stuff). It fades, rips, and it is not that much more $ for some decent construction paper (IMO). I even tell parents that I do not use acid based paper in any of the projects and all have seem glad to hear that.

      5. An assortment of paint brushes! They sell some nice classroom sets. Get a good set of big preschool/kinder brushes, but also have plenty of fine tip and small ones. Do not put out too big of brushes for certain projects because the brush absorbs too much paint and it is just hard to work with - so for older grades I only go up to maybe a flat brush size 14 and round brush size 16 – However, you can wing it if a certain student needs a larger brush! We have built a rapport where someone will come and ask, "Mrs. Prior - I need to cover a lot of area so can I go to the cupboard and get one of those bigger brushes?" - and then it gets put to the side when done - but I have had some hectic messes when big classes were using way too big of brushes - waste, mess, and yuk! ~Side note - Paint rollers are optional, but fun for younger kids - so this is not on the must have list, but keep it on the B list.
      http://www.dickblick.com/productinfo/learn/brushes/pdf/brushsizing.pdf

      6. Dark colored plastic cups for each child to have painting water at the table - but not too large of cups! When we paint, students can just change their water often –(may use sinks or buckets with fresh and used water). The reason for only using small cups is so that if (and when) a cup spills - it does not go everywhere and is easier to contain. And when one spills - I sometimes pause and tell the class, Okay, we just had a water spill - and look how easy it is to clean up - now that is why we use small cups and change them as needed." (it works for us at least).

      7. Paint: get huge bottles of primary, secondary, and tertiary colors –
      I love having some glitter paint in the room – so order a few bottles when you put in your paint order. The 11 pack variety packs are nice, but one year on a budget I only had blue and clear and it was enough! But glitter paint can make certain lessons come alive –like we made a torn paper fish collage one year – used white paper for the cut out of the fish, then used patterned paper pieces to design the interior – mounted it on black - and washed it over with the student's choice of glitter paint. When we hang them in the hall – everyone raved – they were just so cool.
      Metallic paints (and markers) are fun to have too!

      8. Make a Wish list: I make a wish list that I give to parents- and keep it on a class blog and update it. I let them know it is "only if they happen to have the items "(or stumble across them). For example, we needed painting rags one year, and one family was moving and they brought in boxes of cotton cloth, t-shirts, fabric, etc. Be careful though because you can sometimes get too much of an item. This can happen with paper towel rolls and newspaper – they can come in an overload. You can also date the wish-list (it helps prevent overload). For example, `between now and October 1st we will be collecting shoe boxes, so if you have any – please bring it in …'
      And always write thank you notes to those that donate – give verbal kudos too – it affirms the giver and keeps things coming. Again, always note that the wish list is just put out in case someone stumbles on anything – because you do not want the parents feeling over taxed –

      9. Order some canvasses – there are some very affordable packs and if you have enough $ - get one for every student. But if $ is limited, have the oldest class make a canvas and then the other grades will look forward to doing their canvas when they reach that grade. Maybe get some heavy weight watercolor paper for the older kids too -

      10. Have all students bring in a spiral bound 11 x 17 (approx) sketchbook. I used to start every class with a warm up sketch - or some days we would add notes or handouts to it. It can also come in handy for sub days - (assign a sketchbook assignment). The sketchbook can become a nice keep sake - so if you have the space - have each child bring in a sketchbook to leave in art - and work in it as you go along - and at the end of the year write in a personalized note.

      HTH< and best wishes -
      ~Yvette

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "kierendutcher" <dutchworms@...> wrote:
      > > Can you make some suggestions for what we need in the room? And what kind of supplies we need? Do you have a list? There will be about 85 kids all together.
      > > Thank you SO much for your help!
      > > Jennifer
    • Yvette
      I thought of a few more things to consider for stocking the art cabinet: ~ Request a small cash spending account so you can pick up local supplies if needed.
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 28, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I thought of a few more things to consider for stocking the art cabinet:

        ~ Request a small cash spending account so you can pick up local supplies if needed. A flexible spending account can come in handy for times you stumble upon big clearance items (which tends to happen to me a lot) or if you find something unique at a local art supply store and if you choose to buy last minute items (i.e. an item enriches a lesson or helps target an objective or standard).

        ~ MISC:
        I also like to have pipe cleaners, glitter, cardstock, polymer clay, regular clay (even without a kiln there are some nice air dry alternatives that can be used for the grades that target this media), heavy gauge foil, assorted sizes of plastic storage bins with lids, string - rope- yarn, beads, scraps of material, pre-cut paper shapes, wood scraps, cardboard pieces, primer, plenty of cotton rags, plastic for table covers, heavy weight watercolor paper, practice paper, colored pencils, oil pastels, funky scissors, good supply of regular scissors, rulers (non metal- prefer wood) and yard sticks for older grades, MODGE PODGE!, items for drawing a still life, recycled frames and mats, a couple small mannequins for figure drawing (and students just love to work with them), funky paints (metallics, neon, glow in dark, stucco, opaque, 3-D, fabric, etc.) and gouache is lately becoming a must have for moi because it such a versatile paint! Also like to have some area rugs (that can take heavy use) so kids can work on the floor for certain projects (mature students can use floor work to heighten creativity).

        Take care
      • Jennifer Barthmus
        Thank you so much! Where do you order your art supplies from? I have used Saxon in the past but that was a long time ago. Thanks! Jennifer
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 6 6:27 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Thank you so much!
          Where do you order your art supplies from? I have used Saxon in the past but that was a long time ago.
          Thanks!
          Jennifer

          From: Yvette <priorhouse@...>
          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, July 28, 2013 1:15 PM
          Subject: [art_education] Re: What supplies do I need? (more ideas)
           
          I thought of a few more things to consider for stocking the art cabinet:

          ~ Request a small cash spending account so you can pick up local supplies if needed. A flexible spending account can come in handy for times you stumble upon big clearance items (which tends to happen to me a lot) or if you find something unique at a local art supply store and if you choose to buy last minute items (i.e. an item enriches a lesson or helps target an objective or standard).

          ~ MISC:
          I also like to have pipe cleaners, glitter, cardstock, polymer clay, regular clay (even without a kiln there are some nice air dry alternatives that can be used for the grades that target this media), heavy gauge foil, assorted sizes of plastic storage bins with lids, string - rope- yarn, beads, scraps of material, pre-cut paper shapes, wood scraps, cardboard pieces, primer, plenty of cotton rags, plastic for table covers, heavy weight watercolor paper, practice paper, colored pencils, oil pastels, funky scissors, good supply of regular scissors, rulers (non metal- prefer wood) and yard sticks for older grades, MODGE PODGE!, items for drawing a still life, recycled frames and mats, a couple small mannequins for figure drawing (and students just love to work with them), funky paints (metallics, neon, glow in dark, stucco, opaque, 3-D, fabric, etc.) and gouache is lately becoming a must have for moi because it such a versatile paint! Also like to have some area rugs (that can take heavy use) so kids can work on the floor for certain projects (mature students can use floor work to heighten creativity).

          Take care

        • Jennifer Barthmus
          These ideas are so helpful! Thank you!!!!! ________________________________ From: Yvette To: art_education@yahoogroups.com Sent:
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 6 8:14 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            These ideas are so helpful! Thank you!!!!!

            From: Yvette <priorhouse@...>
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 11:34 PM
            Subject: [art_education] Re: What supplies do I need?
             

            I want to second the suggestion about having a basic list - but then also figuring out "what you want to teach" the kids - and getting items for those themes and lessons. This may take teaching a year to really fine tune what you need, but loosely plan your lessons/themes and go from there. . When I first started out I loved the Masterpiece of the month book.
            Here are ten things I thought of, but keep in mind this is because it matches my lessons and the way I teach:

            1. Plenty of 11 x 17 heavy weight WHITE paper. This size paper is great for many projects. I could whip out any drawing or painting lesson with this paper as the base- (i.e. a Matisse water color with layered items; value and shading lessons; intro perspective; pastel abstracts; complementary color lessons with glue and construction paper; tessellations; landscape-cityscape-seascape; animal depiction, self- portraits etc.). And one year I actually had a parent keep every 11x17 we made – and she sewed them together at the end of the year and made a book.

            2. A lot of black paper (at least for me this is a must). A good supply of 8.5 x 11 acid free black paper (and 11 x 17) –can be used for mounting projects, making booklets, for chalk works w/ masking tape, for black & white projects, Mondrian paper grids, etc.

            3. Soft and hard pencils - a good amount of 2h pencils - but also some 5B (or any assortment) but when students are learning to draw certain things, a nice H pencil is easy to erase and does not smudge, but for shading and value, a nice 5B or 6B is key- I also have some nice graphite pencils that work well for grades 3 and up.
            Sometimes we have those cheap pencil sharpeners for kids and students grab them from a basket- so there is not a line with the class sharpener. If you have the space (and with under 100 kids you may be able to do this) you may want to have parents get each child their own pencil case with pencils, eraser, and sharpener – (but be specific on what they need to get or the extreme variations can cause probs).

            4. Plenty of acid free construction paper in many colors. I prefer 11 x 17 as it can be cut down. I do not keep any low quality construction paper in my supply closet- even if stacks of cheap construction paper are donated I prefer not to use this poor quality (even for practice stuff). It fades, rips, and it is not that much more $ for some decent construction paper (IMO). I even tell parents that I do not use acid based paper in any of the projects and all have seem glad to hear that.

            5. An assortment of paint brushes! They sell some nice classroom sets. Get a good set of big preschool/kinder brushes, but also have plenty of fine tip and small ones. Do not put out too big of brushes for certain projects because the brush absorbs too much paint and it is just hard to work with - so for older grades I only go up to maybe a flat brush size 14 and round brush size 16 – However, you can wing it if a certain student needs a larger brush! We have built a rapport where someone will come and ask, "Mrs. Prior - I need to cover a lot of area so can I go to the cupboard and get one of those bigger brushes?" - and then it gets put to the side when done - but I have had some hectic messes when big classes were using way too big of brushes - waste, mess, and yuk! ~Side note - Paint rollers are optional, but fun for younger kids - so this is not on the must have list, but keep it on the B list.
            http://www.dickblick.com/productinfo/learn/brushes/pdf/brushsizing.pdf

            6. Dark colored plastic cups for each child to have painting water at the table - but not too large of cups! When we paint, students can just change their water often –(may use sinks or buckets with fresh and used water). The reason for only using small cups is so that if (and when) a cup spills - it does not go everywhere and is easier to contain. And when one spills - I sometimes pause and tell the class, Okay, we just had a water spill - and look how easy it is to clean up - now that is why we use small cups and change them as needed." (it works for us at least).

            7. Paint: get huge bottles of primary, secondary, and tertiary colors –
            I love having some glitter paint in the room – so order a few bottles when you put in your paint order. The 11 pack variety packs are nice, but one year on a budget I only had blue and clear and it was enough! But glitter paint can make certain lessons come alive –like we made a torn paper fish collage one year – used white paper for the cut out of the fish, then used patterned paper pieces to design the interior – mounted it on black - and washed it over with the student's choice of glitter paint. When we hang them in the hall – everyone raved – they were just so cool.
            Metallic paints (and markers) are fun to have too!

            8. Make a Wish list: I make a wish list that I give to parents- and keep it on a class blog and update it. I let them know it is "only if they happen to have the items "(or stumble across them). For example, we needed painting rags one year, and one family was moving and they brought in boxes of cotton cloth, t-shirts, fabric, etc. Be careful though because you can sometimes get too much of an item. This can happen with paper towel rolls and newspaper – they can come in an overload. You can also date the wish-list (it helps prevent overload). For example, `between now and October 1st we will be collecting shoe boxes, so if you have any – please bring it in …'
            And always write thank you notes to those that donate – give verbal kudos too – it affirms the giver and keeps things coming. Again, always note that the wish list is just put out in case someone stumbles on anything – because you do not want the parents feeling over taxed –

            9. Order some canvasses – there are some very affordable packs and if you have enough $ - get one for every student. But if $ is limited, have the oldest class make a canvas and then the other grades will look forward to doing their canvas when they reach that grade. Maybe get some heavy weight watercolor paper for the older kids too -

            10. Have all students bring in a spiral bound 11 x 17 (approx) sketchbook. I used to start every class with a warm up sketch - or some days we would add notes or handouts to it. It can also come in handy for sub days - (assign a sketchbook assignment). The sketchbook can become a nice keep sake - so if you have the space - have each child bring in a sketchbook to leave in art - and work in it as you go along - and at the end of the year write in a personalized note.

            HTH< and best wishes -
            ~Yvette

            --- In mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com, "kierendutcher" <dutchworms@...> wrote:
            > > Can you make some suggestions for what we need in the room? And what kind of supplies we need? Do you have a list? There will be about 85 kids all together.
            > > Thank you SO much for your help!
            > > Jennifer


          • Donna
            Yvette, I appreciate this comprehensive list of supplies! I m going to copy it, and add to my file.
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 7 5:09 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              Yvette,
              I appreciate this comprehensive list of supplies! I'm going to copy it, and add to my file.


              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Barthmus <barthmusj@...> wrote:
              >
              > These ideas are so helpful! Thank you!!!!!
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Yvette <priorhouse@...>
              > To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 11:34 PM
              > Subject: [art_education] Re: What supplies do I need?
              >
              >  
              >
              >
              > I want to second the suggestion about having a basic list - but then also figuring out "what you want to teach" the kids - and getting items for those themes and lessons. This may take teaching a year to really fine tune what you need, but loosely plan your lessons/themes and go from there. . When I first started out I loved the Masterpiece of the month book.
              > Here are ten things I thought of, but keep in mind this is because it matches my lessons and the way I teach:
              >
              > 1. Plenty of 11 x 17 heavy weight WHITE paper. This size paper is great for many projects. I could whip out any drawing or painting lesson with this paper as the base- (i.e. a Matisse water color with layered items; value and shading lessons; intro perspective; pastel abstracts; complementary color lessons with glue and construction paper; tessellations; landscape-cityscape-seascape; animal depiction, self- portraits etc.). And one year I actually had a parent keep every 11x17 we made â€" and she sewed them together at the end of the year and made a book.
              >
              > 2. A lot of black paper (at least for me this is a must). A good supply of 8.5 x 11 acid free black paper (and 11 x 17) â€"can be used for mounting projects, making booklets, for chalk works w/ masking tape, for black & white projects, Mondrian paper grids, etc.
              >
              > 3. Soft and hard pencils - a good amount of 2h pencils - but also some 5B (or any assortment) but when students are learning to draw certain things, a nice H pencil is easy to erase and does not smudge, but for shading and value, a nice 5B or 6B is key- I also have some nice graphite pencils that work well for grades 3 and up.
              > Sometimes we have those cheap pencil sharpeners for kids and students grab them from a basket- so there is not a line with the class sharpener. If you have the space (and with under 100 kids you may be able to do this) you may want to have parents get each child their own pencil case with pencils, eraser, and sharpener â€" (but be specific on what they need to get or the extreme variations can cause probs).
              >
              > 4. Plenty of acid free construction paper in many colors. I prefer 11 x 17 as it can be cut down. I do not keep any low quality construction paper in my supply closet- even if stacks of cheap construction paper are donated I prefer not to use this poor quality (even for practice stuff). It fades, rips, and it is not that much more $ for some decent construction paper (IMO). I even tell parents that I do not use acid based paper in any of the projects and all have seem glad to hear that.
              >
              > 5. An assortment of paint brushes! They sell some nice classroom sets. Get a good set of big preschool/kinder brushes, but also have plenty of fine tip and small ones. Do not put out too big of brushes for certain projects because the brush absorbs too much paint and it is just hard to work with - so for older grades I only go up to maybe a flat brush size 14 and round brush size 16 â€" However, you can wing it if a certain student needs a larger brush! We have built a rapport where someone will come and ask, "Mrs. Prior - I need to cover a lot of area so can I go to the cupboard and get one of those bigger brushes?" - and then it gets put to the side when done - but I have had some hectic messes when big classes were using way too big of brushes - waste, mess, and yuk! ~Side note - Paint rollers are optional, but fun for younger kids - so this is not on the must have list, but keep it on the B list.
              > http://www.dickblick.com/productinfo/learn/brushes/pdf/brushsizing.pdf
              >
              > 6. Dark colored plastic cups for each child to have painting water at the table - but not too large of cups! When we paint, students can just change their water often â€"(may use sinks or buckets with fresh and used water). The reason for only using small cups is so that if (and when) a cup spills - it does not go everywhere and is easier to contain. And when one spills - I sometimes pause and tell the class, Okay, we just had a water spill - and look how easy it is to clean up - now that is why we use small cups and change them as needed." (it works for us at least).
              >
              > 7. Paint: get huge bottles of primary, secondary, and tertiary colors â€"
              > I love having some glitter paint in the room â€" so order a few bottles when you put in your paint order. The 11 pack variety packs are nice, but one year on a budget I only had blue and clear and it was enough! But glitter paint can make certain lessons come alive â€"like we made a torn paper fish collage one year â€" used white paper for the cut out of the fish, then used patterned paper pieces to design the interior â€" mounted it on black - and washed it over with the student's choice of glitter paint. When we hang them in the hall â€" everyone raved â€" they were just so cool.
              > Metallic paints (and markers) are fun to have too!
              >
              > 8. Make a Wish list: I make a wish list that I give to parents- and keep it on a class blog and update it. I let them know it is "only if they happen to have the items "(or stumble across them). For example, we needed painting rags one year, and one family was moving and they brought in boxes of cotton cloth, t-shirts, fabric, etc. Be careful though because you can sometimes get too much of an item. This can happen with paper towel rolls and newspaper â€" they can come in an overload. You can also date the wish-list (it helps prevent overload). For example, `between now and October 1st we will be collecting shoe boxes, so if you have any â€" please bring it in …'
              > And always write thank you notes to those that donate â€" give verbal kudos too â€" it affirms the giver and keeps things coming. Again, always note that the wish list is just put out in case someone stumbles on anything â€" because you do not want the parents feeling over taxed â€"
              >
              > 9. Order some canvasses â€" there are some very affordable packs and if you have enough $ - get one for every student. But if $ is limited, have the oldest class make a canvas and then the other grades will look forward to doing their canvas when they reach that grade. Maybe get some heavy weight watercolor paper for the older kids too -
              >
              > 10. Have all students bring in a spiral bound 11 x 17 (approx) sketchbook. I used to start every class with a warm up sketch - or some days we would add notes or handouts to it. It can also come in handy for sub days - (assign a sketchbook assignment). The sketchbook can become a nice keep sake - so if you have the space - have each child bring in a sketchbook to leave in art - and work in it as you go along - and at the end of the year write in a personalized note.
              >
              > HTH< and best wishes -
              > ~Yvette
              >
              > --- In mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com, "kierendutcher" <dutchworms@> wrote:
              > > > Can you make some suggestions for what we need in the room? And what kind of supplies we need? Do you have a list? There will be about 85 kids all together.
              > > > Thank you SO much for your help!
              > > > Jennifer
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.