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Art and Literacy - GREAT ideas!

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  • Judy Decker
    Greetings Art Educators, When I was teaching middle school, I always did lessons to tie in with Right to Read Week (this year in Ohio it is May 13 through 17
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 18, 2013
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      Greetings Art Educators,

      When I was teaching middle school, I always did lessons to tie in with
      "Right to Read Week" (this year in Ohio it is May 13 through 17 - for
      school days. the week is through May 19, I think).

      If I had a classroom, I would be grabbing these amazing ideas (links
      below - scroll down) by Tricia Fuglestad. I did get her permission to
      re-post them (also re-posting to Art Education list so all will take a
      second look at the possibilities). I think they can even be adapted to
      high school (at least the portrait ones can be). Tricia, if you see
      this - send me the picture of the Holy Cow. I love it! That one was
      yours, right? I would like to make a card for my brother using that as
      the image on card front - pretty please?. I bought him a Fair Trade
      cow/bull (carved stone from the Shona people Zimbabwe - long story why
      I he "needs" it).

      Thanks to whomever posted Robert Genn's quotes site (The Painter's Key
      - http://painterskeys.com/ ). There is a twice a week newsletter you
      can sign up for which is very nice.

      Regards,

      Judy Decker

      On 2/17/2013 11:08:47 AM, TriciaF wrote:

      > Hi Terry,
      >
      > I have a few art and literacy projects to share.
      >
      > This one is based on idioms. Students illustrate an idiom then say what it
      > really means:
      https://vimeo.com/12236342

      > This is an artist statement and photography project:
      http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=402497

      > This is a 6 words about me project beginning with their self-portrait and
      > then using Wordfoto app to add words about themselves into their image:
      http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=574457
      >
      > Hope this helps in some way:)
      > Tricia Fuglestad
      > IL

      In response to this list post:

      > > Hi everyone
      > > My assistant principal is upset that the students are failing the
      > state exams on writing, so, in every class he is mandating writing. I have
      > had the students write artist statements, but now he wants me to add
      > quotes and interpretation of quotes because the English exam has a section
      > on interpreting a quote and finding 2 pieces of literature that relate to
      > the quote. It seems every week he is coming up with a new mandate. Can
      > anyone help with quote ideas? My head is spinning!
      > >
      > > Thank you!
      >
    • priorhouse
      Hey Judy , well I (Yvette Prior in VA) was the one who shared the painters key website (although I only recently heard of it myself -so I was actually
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 21, 2013
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        Hey Judy , well I (Yvette Prior in VA) was the one who shared the 'painters key' website (although I only recently heard of it myself -so I was actually sharing more just for the quotes access, but I think that Mr. Genn's blog may be useful too).


        - Also, speaking of all these quotes shared lately, well I love one of your recent quotes:

        "cookie-cutter-art-in-the-style-of-every-project-looks-alike"

        and I share the sentiment,

        however, I do think there are times during mass teaching when certain projects can be approached with likeness while still having much value, much personal expression, and the take away is still very rich!

        Anyhow, your "cookie cutter" quote came in handy this week because we had just attended a basketball game - at a really nice middle school- and the gym is decorated with about 80 different 3-D painted cardboard (or foam board) sculpture creations.

        And as we looked at the cool pieces, it soon felt pretty sad - because they all had the same designs and the same patterns and same paint schemes. Still quite wonderful. Still quite beautiful, and the rich primary color use still stands out - but they were also BORING. They all looked "ALMOST" the same. Now grant it - I bet every single one was different, and like the long triangle on the third one had yellow polka dots on blue whereas the 4th one had a short triangle with red dots on yellow.... but from a distance, it lacked personality and really seemed like the entire grade level made, well, the same exact "cookie cutter Project."

        I am not sure of the instructions or of what the teacher (or design lady for the gym) had in mind (there may have been rules to follow) but what if they let students choose even just their own palette? And what if white was left out to do some tinting? Would we have some monochromatic sculptures? - or what if some other colors were left out - like some bright colors, some earth tones, or some metallics? Maybe a few of the sculptures would have kept us looking, but after the first row - we realized they were all the same and glanced at them all and left.

        Anyhow, trying to NOT be too critical here, but it just seemed like the art up on the wall lost something amazing by having every single sculpture look SO alike. And the students may have lost something as well, - many may have lost a chance to "do their thing" and to show their pizazz and let their colors and arrangement choice shine through. Now of course many of the students may have selected the assigned colors,

        but I think we missed out on seeing what some of the students could have shocked us with - creativity that was untapped - or creativity and expression that was limited greatly - because while the cookie cutter style may have some value when teaching certain basics (and may be the best way to mass teach certain objectives), but for other projects - and for certain lessons, it is NOT the way to go and everyone loses out.

        ~Yvette

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Judy Decker <jdecker4art@...> wrote:

        >
        > Thanks to whomever posted Robert Genn's quotes site (The Painter's Key
        > - http://painterskeys.com/ ). There is a twice a week newsletter you
        > can sign up for which is very nice.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Judy Decker
        >
      • Brandy
        Excellently put. This echos the sentiment of Mary Kohl in her article Arts vs. Crafts - http://www.barnesandnoble.com/u/MaryAnn-Kohl-Arts-Crafts/379002813/
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 22, 2013
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          Excellently put. This echos the sentiment of Mary Kohl in her article "Arts vs. Crafts" -
          http://www.barnesandnoble.com/u/MaryAnn-Kohl-Arts-Crafts/379002813/
          I have learned that children in middle and higher that have decided "art" is not their label have created a block to being creative or expressing themselves through visual mediums. I do some drawing "crafts" with a goal in mind. Say, a Celtic knot or making a generic face, and we'll all make one that looks like x or y. But it's usually a spring board for individual work. My hope is that being shown they can achieve the drawing portion allows them room to grow it into a more individual expression for the larger project.
          Regards,
          Brandy


          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "priorhouse" <priorhouse@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey Judy , well I (Yvette Prior in VA) was the one who shared the 'painters key' website (although I only recently heard of it myself -so I was actually sharing more just for the quotes access, but I think that Mr. Genn's blog may be useful too).
          >
          >
          > - Also, speaking of all these quotes shared lately, well I love one of your recent quotes:
          >
          > "cookie-cutter-art-in-the-style-of-every-project-looks-alike"
          >
          > and I share the sentiment,
          >
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