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Wet media paper

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  • goseeart
    What paper do you use with tempera cakes? The paper I use says its for all wet media, but after it dries, the edges curl up and watercolor paper is too
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 25, 2012
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      What paper do you use with tempera cakes? The paper I use says its for all wet media, but after it dries, the edges curl up and watercolor paper is too expensive to use everyday. Any suggestions??? Thanks, Ellen
    • Diane Gregory
      Ellen, You might try using a very heavy white drawing paper or white construction paper.  I generally like the white construction paper best since it is
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 25, 2012
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        Ellen,

        You might try using a very heavy white drawing paper or white construction paper.  I generally like the white construction paper best since it is usually more absorbent than the drawing paper I have.  But in any case, there is still some curling of the paper.  Heavy duty water-color paper is the best to use, but as you say---it is very expensive.

        I make my own tempera cakes using powdered tempera and because of this the tempera is more like watercolor than tempera.  It is a problem to find good quality paper for this activity.  I generally prefer to use liquid tempera but sometimes that is not feasible due to all the supplies and the clean-up involved.

        Good luck.

        Diane
         




        From: goseeart <goseeart@...>
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 2:42 PM
        Subject: [art_education] Wet media paper

         
        What paper do you use with tempera cakes? The paper I use says its for all wet media, but after it dries, the edges curl up and watercolor paper is too expensive to use everyday. Any suggestions??? Thanks, Ellen



      • kamla ravikumar
        Hi, We use Cartridge paper.It does not curlup and is quite sturdy for Tempera paint use.   Kamla Chennai,India Hi, We use Cartridge paper.It does not curlup
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 26, 2012
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          Hi,
          We use Cartridge paper.It does not curlup and is quite sturdy for Tempera paint use.
           
          Kamla
          Chennai,India
        • ednakate
          For those who may not know what Cartridge paper is, it is an un-coated heavy drawing paper with a texture and weight similar to tag board or heavy weight card
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 27, 2012
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            For those who may not know what Cartridge paper is, it is an un-coated heavy drawing paper with a texture and weight similar to tag board or heavy weight card stock.
            Alyssa
            San Diego

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, kamla ravikumar <kamla_rk@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi,
            > We use Cartridge paper.It does not curlup and is quite sturdy for Tempera paint use.
            >  
            > Kamla
            > Chennai,India
            >
          • David Exner
            You may want to see if a local printer has any sheets of bristol board or index weight paper. If you are ordering from an Art catalogue, you could get by with
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 27, 2012
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              You may want to see if a local printer has any sheets of bristol board or index weight paper.  If you are ordering from an Art catalogue, you could get by with 80lb white sulphite.

               

              Peace,

              David Exner

               

              We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.  Winston Churchill


              David G. Exner
              Art Teacher & Art Club Co-Adviser


              Community High School, District 94
              West Chicago
              (630) 876-6407


               

              From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [art_education@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Diane Gregory [gregory.diane55@yahoo..com]
              Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 4:31 PM
              To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [art_education] Wet media paper

               


              Ellen,

              You might try using a very heavy white drawing paper or white construction paper.  I generally like the white construction paper best since it is usually more absorbent than the drawing paper I have.  But in any case, there is still some curling of the paper.  Heavy duty water-color paper is the best to use, but as you say---it is very expensive.

              I make my own tempera cakes using powdered tempera and because of this the tempera is more like watercolor than tempera.  It is a problem to find good quality paper for this activity.  I generally prefer to use liquid tempera but sometimes that is not feasible due to all the supplies and the clean-up involved.

              Good luck.

              Diane
               




              From: goseeart <goseeart@...>
              To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 2:42 PM
              Subject: [art_education] Wet media paper

               
              What paper do you use with tempera cakes? The paper I use says its for all wet media, but after it dries, the edges curl up and watercolor paper is too expensive to use everyday. Any suggestions??? Thanks, Ellen



            • Elizabeth Vetne
              I can t really afford to purchase more expensive, heavy weight paper, so I have the kids tape the paper to a big board (like a piece of cardboard) on the
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 27, 2012
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                I can't really afford to purchase more expensive, heavy weight paper, so I have the kids tape the paper to a big board (like a piece of cardboard) on the edges. Use large pieces of tape to create a whole white boarder- it looks nice in the end with a border, anyway! When you do that and allow the paint to dry with the paper taped to a board, it's not completely wrinkle-free, but the edges remain nice and flat. It's not perfect, but better than nothing!


                On Tue, Nov 27, 2012 at 5:01 PM, David Exner <dexner@...> wrote:
                 

                You may want to see if a local printer has any sheets of bristol board or index weight paper.  If you are ordering from an Art catalogue, you could get by with 80lb white sulphite.

                 

                Peace,

                David Exner

                 

                We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.  Winston Churchill


                David G. Exner
                Art Teacher & Art Club Co-Adviser


                Community High School, District 94
                West Chicago
                (630) 876-6407


                 

                From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [art_education@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Diane Gregory [gregory.diane55@yahoo..com]
                Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 4:31 PM
                To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [art_education] Wet media paper

                 


                Ellen,

                You might try using a very heavy white drawing paper or white construction paper.  I generally like the white construction paper best since it is usually more absorbent than the drawing paper I have.  But in any case, there is still some curling of the paper.  Heavy duty water-color paper is the best to use, but as you say---it is very expensive.

                I make my own tempera cakes using powdered tempera and because of this the tempera is more like watercolor than tempera.  It is a problem to find good quality paper for this activity.  I generally prefer to use liquid tempera but sometimes that is not feasible due to all the supplies and the clean-up involved.

                Good luck.

                Diane
                 




                From: goseeart <goseeart@...>
                To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 2:42 PM
                Subject: [art_education] Wet media paper

                 
                What paper do you use with tempera cakes? The paper I use says its for all wet media, but after it dries, the edges curl up and watercolor paper is too expensive to use everyday. Any suggestions??? Thanks, Ellen




                This email communication and its attachments, if any, may contain CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION WHICH MAY ALSO BE LEGALLY PRIVILEGED and is intended only for the use of the recipient(s) identified above.  The unauthorized review, use, dissemination, distribution, downloading, or copying of this communication or any of its attachments is strictly prohibited.  If you have received this communication in error, please immediately notify the listed sender by reply email, and delete and otherwise destroy all copies
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              • Julie Casebourn
                It may sound weird, but to get by with watercolor on thinner paper I iron them on warm stacked 3 or 4 high when complete and they are flat as a board
                Message 7 of 10 , Nov 28, 2012
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                  It may sound weird, but to "get by" with watercolor on thinner paper I iron them on warm stacked 3 or 4 high when complete and they are flat as a board afterwards.  Watercolor paper is so expensive and heavy 80lb paper works fine when I use the iron.



                  From: Elizabeth Vetne <evetne@...>
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 4:12 PM
                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Wet media paper

                   
                  I can't really afford to purchase more expensive, heavy weight paper, so I have the kids tape the paper to a big board (like a piece of cardboard) on the edges. Use large pieces of tape to create a whole white boarder- it looks nice in the end with a border, anyway! When you do that and allow the paint to dry with the paper taped to a board, it's not completely wrinkle-free, but the edges remain nice and flat. It's not perfect, but better than nothing!


                  On Tue, Nov 27, 2012 at 5:01 PM, David Exner <dexner@...> wrote:
                   
                  You may want to see if a local printer has any sheets of bristol board or index weight paper.  If you are ordering from an Art catalogue, you could get by with 80lb white sulphite.
                   
                  Peace,
                  David Exner
                   
                  We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.  Winston Churchill


                  David G. Exner
                  Art Teacher & Art Club Co-Adviser


                  Community High School, District 94
                  West Chicago
                  (630) 876-6407


                   

                  From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [art_education@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Diane Gregory [gregory.diane55@yahoo..com]
                  Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 4:31 PM
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Wet media paper

                   

                  Ellen,

                  You might try using a very heavy white drawing paper or white construction paper.  I generally like the white construction paper best since it is usually more absorbent than the drawing paper I have.  But in any case, there is still some curling of the paper.  Heavy duty water-color paper is the best to use, but as you say---it is very expensive.

                  I make my own tempera cakes using powdered tempera and because of this the tempera is more like watercolor than tempera.  It is a problem to find good quality paper for this activity.  I generally prefer to use liquid tempera but sometimes that is not feasible due to all the supplies and the clean-up involved.

                  Good luck.

                  Diane
                   




                  From: goseeart <goseeart@...>
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 2:42 PM
                  Subject: [art_education] Wet media paper

                   
                  What paper do you use with tempera cakes? The paper I use says its for all wet media, but after it dries, the edges curl up and watercolor paper is too expensive to use everyday. Any suggestions??? Thanks, Ellen




                  This email communication and its attachments, if any, may contain CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION WHICH MAY ALSO BE LEGALLY PRIVILEGED and is intended only for the use of the recipient(s) identified above.  The unauthorized review, use, dissemination, distribution, downloading, or copying of this communication or any of its attachments is strictly prohibited.  If you have received this communication in error, please immediately notify the listed sender by reply email, and delete and otherwise destroy all copies
                  of the communication and all attachments to the communication.





                • Miki Rodriguez
                  I ve also used a variety of papers for painting. They all respond based on their quality. There is the 80lb. manila and the white sulphite paper I purchased at
                  Message 8 of 10 , Nov 28, 2012
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                    I've also used a variety of papers for painting. They all respond based on their quality. There is the 80lb. manila and the white sulphite paper I purchased at Sax Art Supplies, tagboard, student grade watercolor paper, construction paper, and even standard copy paper in a pinch.

                    Here's what I think...the thicker the paper, the better the durability during painting. However, my students have used manila paper and copy paper with ink wash and have had decent results. The problem lies in rubbing with the brush. The more the child scrubs or rubs the loaded brush on a surface, the more the paper disintegrates.

                    So I have students do a series of paint exercises on cheap heavy paper, like manila, (not thin newsprint) until they are fairly comfortable with the medium, and then there will be less scraping and rubbing when its time to work on a graded painting assignment.

                    Also, in reference to paper curling up, all papers curl up when they get wet and then dry. Watercolor paper can be taped down around the edges with masking tape or painter's tape on a drawing board or desk to minimize the curl, but there is still a curl. So I have used heavy flat boards (drawing boards) to flatten the work after it dries and I have been successful with this most of the time. A note about heavy tempera on paper, it cracks.  

                    Miki Rodriguez

                  • Larry Seiler
                    yea...so much expense, especially supplying one district K-12...too much on one thing a detriment to other. I eventually eliminated watercolor altogether.
                    Message 9 of 10 , Nov 29, 2012
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                      yea...so much expense, especially supplying one district K-12...too much on one thing a detriment to other.

                      I eventually eliminated watercolor altogether.  Well...traditional.
                      I found it cheaper and even easier to teach methods using gouache...and you can buy Yarka 12 40ml plastic pods for $14

                      which lasts a long time.

                      Chromacryl with pumps...good value...

                      and as for tempera using up what I have left of the old Crayola powdered color.  Really liked those, mixing the consistency I liked storing in ketchup plastic squeeze bottles.

                      The tempera worked well used like watercolor, and I would tape freezewrap paper shiny side up as palettes that were easy to clean.  If I had multiple classes, they were easy to wipe with damp sponge for next class, and my ketchup bottles could put enough at the top for students to use.

                      a lot of illustrative techniques of applying washes of color over ballpoint pen drawings stretched my budget and developed some good little artists.

                      Never was a big fan of using tempera so thick it cracked on paper anyway...but tempera acts very much like watercolor, the color is good...and goes a long way when thinned with water and applied as such.

                      Thus...my 80lb white sulphite paper has proved to be fine...best if washes of color simply do not extend all to the end of paper...but regardless...if the paper has a curl when dry, I show students how to take the 12"x 18" sheet of paper (or smaller) to the flat end edge of a table.  Grip it curled side up, and rub along the side (much like dragging paper strips across a scissors to curl).  Done with care...you easily draw the curl right out of those paintings.  They flatten easily enough and that's that.  Of course if you're painting thick tempera that cracks, you can't do that...

                      My Chromacryl also can be used thin enough to imitate watercolor...or as is for murals and regular easel painting.

                      --
                      artist's website- http://larryseiler.com
                      my art blog- http://larryseiler.blogspot.com
                    • M Lerner
                      I keep a regular iron in my class room and we actually iron work that has curled to much- it only takes a moment to make our papers flat again. M Lerner Art
                      Message 10 of 10 , Nov 29, 2012
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                        I keep a regular iron in my class room and we actually iron work that has curled to much- it only takes a moment to make our papers flat again.

                        M Lerner

                        Art teacher
                        Welsh Hills School


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