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Native American art ideas?

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  • Brandy
    I ll be doing American Art next year as the theme and art history cycle. For some reason when I look up American Art timelines, it excludes Native American art
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 7, 2012
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      I'll be doing American Art next year as the theme and art history cycle.
      For some reason when I look up American Art timelines, it excludes Native American art examples and often begins in 1800 or 1700. I find this a misjustice to the Americans who made art for thousands of years before European influence.
      I teach middle and highschool primarily, which is the other problem, that I can't seem to find many good upper aged art projects to do on this topic.
      Suggestions would be welcome:)
      Brandy
    • Kathleen Maledon
      I think other than the northwestern tribes and a few that had religious or burial artifacts, all the art was useable. I agree with your thoughts on the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 8, 2012
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        I think other than the northwestern tribes and a few that had religious or burial artifacts, all the art was useable.  I agree with your thoughts on the timeline.
        Perhaps they are putting prehistoric (cave, petroglyphs, etc) as prehistory.
        On Jul 7, 2012, at 8:15 AM, Brandy wrote:

        I'll be doing American Art next year as the theme and art history cycle.
        For some reason when I look up American Art timelines, it excludes Native American art examples and often begins in 1800 or 1700. I find this a misjustice to the Americans who made art for thousands of years before European influence.
        I teach middle and highschool primarily, which is the other problem, that I can't seem to find many good upper aged art projects to do on this topic. 
        Suggestions would be welcome:)
        Brandy


      • Jenifer Weiss
        The Smithsonian Native American Art Museum in a valuable resource. The people in the education department are very helpful and invested in getting the images
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 8, 2012
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          The Smithsonian Native American Art Museum in a valuable resource.  The people in the education department are very helpful and invested in getting the images and information out to teachers and schools.  

          Call them.  (or email)  Think pueblo, hopi pottery, weaving, architecture, jewelry
          Tlinglit etc button blankets, canoes, masks fetishes, clothing

          its so connected to the environment, culture, geography, climate, food sources etc...

          Very rich area for art and learning!


          Jenifer




          Sent from my iPad

          On Jul 8, 2012, at 3:15 AM, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:

           

          I think other than the northwestern tribes and a few that had religious or burial artifacts, all the art was useable.  I agree with your thoughts on the timeline.

          Perhaps they are putting prehistoric (cave, petroglyphs, etc) as prehistory.
          On Jul 7, 2012, at 8:15 AM, Brandy wrote:

          I'll be doing American Art next year as the theme and art history cycle.
          For some reason when I look up American Art timelines, it excludes Native American art examples and often begins in 1800 or 1700. I find this a misjustice to the Americans who made art for thousands of years before European influence.
          I teach middle and highschool primarily, which is the other problem, that I can't seem to find many good upper aged art projects to do on this topic. 
          Suggestions would be welcome:)
          Brandy


        • The Ericksons
          Brandy, I live in Oklahoma and thus grew up around Native American art. However, I do find it interesting that many of the museums here have mostly white
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 9, 2012
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            Brandy,

            I live in Oklahoma and thus grew up around Native American art.   However, I do find it interesting that many of the museums here have mostly white artists who painted ABOUT native Americans rather than a large collection of actual native American artwork.   I have wondered if it is because the early Indians were very mobile and their artwork tended to be functional items such as blankets, baskets and pottery.   Maybe a lot of it didn’t survive the many moves or the abuse they suffered when they were moved forcibly?    Perhaps an assignment for your HS students that requires them to create a work of art that is aesthetically pleasing and also functional? 

             

            The Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa has some things.  They don’t put much online which is a disappointment to me but this might help:    http://gilcrease.utulsa.edu/Explore    click on photo gallery

             

            Also:  https://woolaroc.org/pages/art/art-gallery?type=native_american 

             

            Cindy  

             

            From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brandy
            Sent: Saturday, July 07, 2012 10:15 AM
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [art_education] Native American art ideas?

             

             

            I'll be doing American Art next year as the theme and art history cycle.
            For some reason when I look up American Art timelines, it excludes Native American art examples and often begins in 1800 or 1700. I find this a misjustice to the Americans who made art for thousands of years before European influence.
            I teach middle and highschool primarily, which is the other problem, that I can't seem to find many good upper aged art projects to do on this topic.
            Suggestions would be welcome:)
            Brandy

          • Stephanie Cavallaro
            Look up storyteller figures. I had great success with my middle schoolers as a clay project. There was also lots of potential for discussion about families and
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 11, 2012
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              Look up storyteller figures. I had great success with my middle schoolers as a clay project. There was also lots of potential for discussion about families and relationships. My students enjoyed making the figures to go with their family members. (Ex: A mother with 3 girls, or a boy and girl, a grandmother, etc) They also enjoyed adding the patterns with acrylic.

              I have also done a pen and ink lesson. We created simple still lifes of pottery, discussed overlapping, near and far, large and small, simple perspective. We decorated with invented native american patterns, then added color with chalk pastels.
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