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Re: NEED summer art school lesson plans please!!

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  • priorhouse
    Jeanette, I know a couple of teachers that are experts at using up what was in the closet - like a chef that can make masterpieces with leftovers -, and a
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 3, 2012
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      Jeanette,

      I know a couple of teachers that are experts at using up "what was in the closet" - like a chef that can make masterpieces with leftovers -, and a couple of years I ended up (at times) planning lessons from what was stored. This wasn't just for cost reasons, it was also to use up excess from an overstuffed supply room - and it was personally challenging to maybe get back to basics - and to just appreciate the nuts and bolts of art supplies. and to me - those nuts and bolts were paints, pencils, pastels (chalks and oils) and PAPER.

      So take a look around the closet, cabinets, and storage stuff, --because it may trigger ideas. It may take a few hours to do this - but while you are searching/scanning - more ideas may come as you look - or -for at times when we have absolutely no fresh ideas - well assessing a fresh inventory of what you have and adds to your ongoing creativity. and then when you scan POL lessons or skim some old lesson books to spark ideas (and do not minimize those - get 'em out and scan some classic favs) - well your supplies may dictate how you curve the lesson for this week. Also, the upcoming weeks may need to be modified after working with the kids in this particular class... what have they been soaking up. What really peeked their interest? Your classes will come even more alive when you cater to some personal interest - and my planning has actually tried to allow for some of this customizing. Like one year - the kids loved loved loved oil pastels - and we were blending with fingers, towels, cotton, etc. Each year I kind of note what was most engaging....and still reflecting more on this aspect...but some of the best lessons can come from digging through supplies that need to be used up....






      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "jeanette_10" <jeanette_10@...> wrote:
      >
      > I start teaching a summer school art class next week. its ele school age kids and we have around 4 classes for 45 mins each class everyday- they expect me to come up with lesson plans to keep them busy for 4 days a week and 5 weeks with LIMITED supplies (they dont wish to buy anymore supplies just go on what was left over from the school yr)
      > we are supposed to have at least ONE 3D lesson and NO I dont want to use sculpty clay again (what a mess and waste) and one lesson on something on tee shirts (they do this every yr)
    • priorhouse
      IDEAS!! (for your 45 minutes of art - 4 x a week) Monday - Masterpiece intro!!! Then sketch and paint their version of it. Spend some time introducing a famous
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 3, 2012
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        IDEAS!! (for your 45 minutes of art - 4 x a week)

        Monday - Masterpiece intro!!! Then sketch and paint their version of it.
        Spend some time introducing a famous art piece. Do not minimize the significance of this - because kids will soak it up - and remember they love to hear your opinion and a little bit about your likes and dislikes - or how you have grown with the piece - or why you chose it. Like some pieces I tell the students why a piece is selected my art teachers every where (like maybe Matisse's Goldfish) or why I personally chose a piece to spend so much time with this week.

        Tuesday- Quiet sketch/pencil skills and Playing with paper!-
        The sketch of the day can incorporate pencil pressure skills, working with colored pencils, learning more about different pencil types, tortillion use....etc. If allowed, sometimes it is a treat to wrap up the week by doing an outdoor sketch - but it depends on the kids, the school policies, etc. -
        Then wrap up lesson with Playing with paper. The paper put out (and samples from you) connect to the theme or masterpiece of the week (even if only a little) - then they cut, rip, or fold to make a take-home piece. In one art closet, a former teacher had left a bunch of brown paper squares with circles traced in the middle. So I passed them out with some scraps of yellow netting - and the challenge was what can you make with those two items? students made a fish stuck in a net, a planet, a microscope slide, etc.

        Wednesday- Concept of the week! Draw and then paint - this lesson can piggy back on monday's masterpiece, or just intro a new concept. But this is a meaty part of the lesson that teaches a skill and maybe some art terms. What is one-point perspective? How do you show near and far? When to tint, when to shade? What does color theory mean? What are EOA? The painting part can explore light, reflection, tinting, etc.

        Thursday - Creative Stations (and have one large table for working on t-shirts) Stations are easy to set up (*and I think there are MANY past posts on this subject with even more ideas). Students can move through three of four stations that are set up around the room-(and a single desk can easily become a station) Students are also invited to finish up any art work that was leftover from the week (the idea is to to have things ready to take home on Friday).


        T-shirt notes: - Because tye-dye shirts can be more for a long day of camp, I always prefer the quick version of t-shirt design that involves using pre-made stencils or creating our own designs with brushes or raised fabric paint (BTW - sharpie has a new line of fabric pens-) but any fabric paint can be experimented with and some can be watered down and used a spray. One year we had extra picture transfer paper - and so I printed everyone's picture - ironed them on the shirt - and the next day, they took fabric paint (in only three colors) and sprayed on a design around the picture. Some had the sleeves super dark while others had a mist of color in a pattern over the shirt. But other years, students either used a pre-made stencil to paint around( and then in)- or created and cut their own and made a one of a kind shirt.


        Here is an example using Matisse's Lady in Purple Coat:

        Day 1 (Monday) introduce Matisse's lady in Purple coat (Have a nice colored copy of it). Intro that the theme of week will look at secondary colors and teach about complements. Also so many EOA and principles are hidden in this piece. On first day, share some fun tidbits about the piece (where it is located) and have students offer some art criticism about it... then as a class, make a rough outline of their version of the piece - and then they paint it in.

        Day 2 (Tuesday) Start with sketching (then play with paper).... thinking of Matisse's picture, make a pencil sketch that does something unique in each corner of the page - show light medium and dark - and maybe challenge with some blending (depends on age and experience). Can use shading pencils, colored pencils, etc.
        Give a tutorial - remember that teacher tutorials are potent! Do not minimize them because kids learn sooo much from your sharing - take the time to demo and share -

        The playing with paper part of the lesson can provide random supplies and at least two or three sample pictures with paper ideas. So make some creations with rolled paper, torn patterns, curls, quill, or make frumpy grass - and then kids create and let dry (or take). Put out scissors, glue, and lots of types and patterns of paper (scrap paper is fun here).

        Day 3 (wed) Art terms! Today we will learn about balance (balance refers to the ways in which the elements (lines, shapes, colors, textures, etc.) and then make secondary colors from primary - and the goal is to make something the main focus of a piece using a bright, secondary color. Talk about Matisse used a purple coat to anchor his picture - what is informal and formal balance - and ask what kind of item will you use in your piece? You can also share a nicely illustrated children's book that highlights more examples (this has led to student's making a nice house, using a bird at the center, or even just making the neighbors in silhouette. For example, I used Old Henry by Joan Blos because it has a nice social theme, it rhymes and move fast, and the variety of pics have such FUN use of colors - and the book balances the fem/masculine feel of the week - lady in the coat - and now man with the rickety house....Anyhow, this day - try to share some nice art terms and tell students what they mean - or talk about how term came about.
        Students then paint - can out out regular paper - or dig in the closet to see what is there. use up some of those canvas panels - or may take out the cardboard scraps and leave out an assortment. One year we had two boxes of 12 x 12 paper (donated by a former scrap booking parent) and so I put out 12 x 12 paper to paint on (some of it was heavy and light).

        Day 4 (Thursday). Stations then t-shirt design.... Setting up stations around the room can allow students to follow interests and spend more or less time in area that caters to them. Stations with this Matisse drawing will offer three that work with complementary colors. One can use thick glitter paper in blue and orange - and then put out some blue and orange pipe cleaners and misc. things from the closet in these colors. Station #two offers foam pieces in red and green. also have Red and green yarn - Then, put out a little dish of red and little dish of green paint - with four different sized brushes (or sponges) - and a stack of white paper (5 x 7). Station three has purple and yellow items, including some purple and yellow gel sticks (thick oil pastel in a stick- and kids loved the edgy look - is it lip balm? no!). Can put out purple and yellow crayons, beads, white paper bags, colored sand, etc.
        One station could also have students each get four popsicle sticks and they make designs on one side and then they play the toss game (and get 25 points for each stick - up to 100 points per toss). Play in rounds of ten - first one to reach 1000 points wins - then groups rotate. This adds much energy and fun as the winner is the luck of the toss!!- and the students have a game to take home.

        Hope that helps a bit. Take care (and have fun!)

        Mrs. Prior in VA


        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "jeanette_10" <jeanette_10@...> wrote:
        >
        > I start teaching a summer school art class next week. its ele school age kids and we have around 4 classes for 45 mins each class everyday- they expect me to come up with lesson plans to keep them busy for 4 days a week and 5 weeks with LIMITED supplies (they dont wish to buy anymore supplies just go on what was left over from the school yr)
        > we are supposed to have at least ONE 3D lesson and NO I dont want to use sculpty clay again (what a mess and waste) and one lesson on something on tee shirts (they do this every yr) everything else can be 2 d with crayons, pencils, color pencils etc
        > if you can,,,email me a complete lesson including supply list and estimated time it takes for each lesson,,,the longer it takes the better and that means LESS lessons I will have to have
        >
        >
        > thank you SOOOOO much for ur assistance!
        >
      • raylene wilkinson
        maybe paper sculpture? children colour and twist and bend shapes out of cut strips of paper... I ll see if i can find an image to help :D
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 3, 2012
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          maybe paper sculpture?   children colour and twist and bend shapes out of cut strips of paper... I'll see if i can find an image to help :D
          On 04/07/2012, at 12:40 AM, priorhouse wrote:

           

          Jeanette,

          I know a couple of teachers that are experts at using up "what was in the closet" - like a chef that can make masterpieces with leftovers -, and a couple of years I ended up (at times) planning lessons from what was stored. This wasn't just for cost reasons, it was also to use up excess from an overstuffed supply room - and it was personally challenging to maybe get back to basics - and to just appreciate the nuts and bolts of art supplies. and to me - those nuts and bolts were paints, pencils, pastels (chalks and oils) and PAPER.

          So take a look around the closet, cabinets, and storage stuff, --because it may trigger ideas. It may take a few hours to do this - but while you are searching/scanning - more ideas may come as you look - or -for at times when we have absolutely no fresh ideas - well assessing a fresh inventory of what you have and adds to your ongoing creativity. and then when you scan POL lessons or skim some old lesson books to spark ideas (and do not minimize those - get 'em out and scan some classic favs) - well your supplies may dictate how you curve the lesson for this week. Also, the upcoming weeks may need to be modified after working with the kids in this particular class... what have they been soaking up. What really peeked their interest? Your classes will come even more alive when you cater to some personal interest - and my planning has actually tried to allow for some of this customizing. Like one year - the kids loved loved loved oil pastels - and we were blending with fingers, towels, cotton, etc. Each year I kind of note what was most engaging....and still reflecting more on this aspect...but some of the best lessons can come from digging through supplies that need to be used up....

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "jeanette_10" <jeanette_10@...> wrote:
          >
          > I start teaching a summer school art class next week. its ele school age kids and we have around 4 classes for 45 mins each class everyday- they expect me to come up with lesson plans to keep them busy for 4 days a week and 5 weeks with LIMITED supplies (they dont wish to buy anymore supplies just go on what was left over from the school yr)
          > we are supposed to have at least ONE 3D lesson and NO I dont want to use sculpty clay again (what a mess and waste) and one lesson on something on tee shirts (they do this every yr)


        • raylene wilkinson
          http://frecklephoto.com/category/art-projects/ http://www.handmadecharlotte.com/projects-cereal-box-village/ sorry i can t find the original link for the
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 3, 2012
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            sorry i can't find the original link for the pringles container. we've used shuttle cock containers also.  I also couldn't find an image for the paper sculpture i was talking about but these might kick start some ideas?


            cheers!
            Raylene

            On 04/07/2012, at 12:40 AM, priorhouse wrote:

             

            Jeanette,

            I know a couple of teachers that are experts at using up "what was in the closet" - like a chef that can make masterpieces with leftovers -, and a couple of years I ended up (at times) planning lessons from what was stored. This wasn't just for cost reasons, it was also to use up excess from an overstuffed supply room - and it was personally challenging to maybe get back to basics - and to just appreciate the nuts and bolts of art supplies. and to me - those nuts and bolts were paints, pencils, pastels (chalks and oils) and PAPER.

            So take a look around the closet, cabinets, and storage stuff, --because it may trigger ideas. It may take a few hours to do this - but while you are searching/scanning - more ideas may come as you look - or -for at times when we have absolutely no fresh ideas - well assessing a fresh inventory of what you have and adds to your ongoing creativity. and then when you scan POL lessons or skim some old lesson books to spark ideas (and do not minimize those - get 'em out and scan some classic favs) - well your supplies may dictate how you curve the lesson for this week. Also, the upcoming weeks may need to be modified after working with the kids in this particular class... what have they been soaking up. What really peeked their interest? Your classes will come even more alive when you cater to some personal interest - and my planning has actually tried to allow for some of this customizing. Like one year - the kids loved loved loved oil pastels - and we were blending with fingers, towels, cotton, etc. Each year I kind of note what was most engaging....and still reflecting more on this aspect...but some of the best lessons can come from digging through supplies that need to be used up....

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "jeanette_10" <jeanette_10@...> wrote:
            >
            > I start teaching a summer school art class next week. its ele school age kids and we have around 4 classes for 45 mins each class everyday- they expect me to come up with lesson plans to keep them busy for 4 days a week and 5 weeks with LIMITED supplies (they dont wish to buy anymore supplies just go on what was left over from the school yr)
            > we are supposed to have at least ONE 3D lesson and NO I dont want to use sculpty clay again (what a mess and waste) and one lesson on something on tee shirts (they do this every yr)


          • Joan Maresh Hansen
            Hello Everyone and Lisa, Although I never taught Elementary School, I did have the pleasure of teaching elementary art methods at the University of Houston. I
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 6, 2012
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              Hello Everyone and  Lisa,
              Although I never taught Elementary School, I did have the pleasure of teaching 
              elementary art methods at the University of Houston. I remembered that when I saw your post.
              Here are some ( 9) of the ideas and lessons that we taught on a shoestring budget.
               Most of these lessons use materials found or brought into the art room and can easily be obtained. 
              I photographed the images  and  will post them  in a Photo Album entitled 
               Elementary Art Lessons on a Shoestring Budget @ http://www.facebook.com/TheArtLife
              If so inclined please LIKE the fan pageā€¦
              The lessons  are described in the photo album so that they can be easily distinguished.
              Also look through the Middle school photo albums where I did a long term Substitute 
              teaching assignment for the color line designs, the self portraits, halls,and name events. I 
              always taught high school however I adapted these  lessons for middle school and they worked out fine. 
              Hope this helps, good luck  with summer school and enjoy the children...



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