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Re: classroom rewards and consequences

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  • Cathy Wilson
    I am fortunate not to have big groups so I can run my classes with inherent rewards. This is at the junior high level. I teach incrementally and repetetively
    Message 1 of 9 , May 10, 2012
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      I am fortunate not to have big groups so I can run my classes with inherent rewards. This is at the junior high level. I teach incrementally and repetetively so students know just what they need to do to paint a clean line or place eyes correctly in a portrait. Then I walk around and say, "Wow! You got that line so smooth!" and stuff like that. The others hear that and want the inherent reward of doing it right.
       
      When someone is in process with a good result, I will often ask his/her permission to pick it up and show it to the group and explain why it's turning out so well. This is another inherent reward that they just love and they work really hard to get things going well so I can demo with their pieces.
       
      I actually display everybody's work. Everybody has to "mat" the piece (with construction paper behind, using gluesticks) and post it. We often stand around and just look at the various pieces and talk about them. I also put the pieces out in the display cases in the hall so the school can enjoy them.
       
      No, no gold stars.
       
      Our school has a very straightforward discipline program so if anyone breaks one of the rules, I immediately apply the school consequence, no threats, no warnings. Everyone knows what the rules are and they know I'll always follow through. However, teaching really clearly and giving all those inherent rewards makes it so I rarely have a discipline problem in art.
       
      Cathy Wilson
      Art and English Teacher
      Carbon School District
    • priorhouse
      I also work with students using the verbal compliments that Cathy mentioned in her post. Like with a drawing lesson, as I walk the room I will say something
      Message 2 of 9 , May 10, 2012
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        I also work with students using the verbal compliments that Cathy mentioned in her post. Like with a drawing lesson, as I walk the room I will say something like, "You nailed the lesson concept exactly!" Verbal praise - that is specific and authentic - is sometimes the best ind/class motivator. This year with a mixed age group - I went back to this old system of using a chart on the dry erase board that wrote in names for students that did certain jobs or just helped. throughout the year - I would say, go add your name to the board - and it really motivated and encouraged. the two oldest kids, I told them it was more geared for younger ones, but reminded them that it helped me see how much they did to help as well... and so if they could praticipate it would be appreciated. Respecting the students always begets more of a pleasant working bond as well.
        HTH

        ~Mrs. Prior


        > Then I walk around and say,
        > "Wow! You got that line so smooth!" and stuff like that. The others hear
        > that and want the inherent reward of doing it right.
        >
        > When someone is in process with a good result, I will often ask his/her
        > permission to pick it up and show it to the group and explain why it's
        > turning out so well. This is another inherent reward that they just love
        > and they work really hard to get things going well so I can demo with their
        > pieces.
        >
        > Cathy Wilson
        > Art and English Teacher
        > Carbon School District
        >
      • Julia Garnett
        I teach in 4 buildings, 1,300 students, grades young 5 s to 8th grade. Some days I have 9 classes. I ve been teaching for 20 years. I ve had several interns
        Message 3 of 9 , May 11, 2012
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          I teach in 4 buildings, 1,300 students, grades young 5's to 8th grade. Some days I have 9 classes. I've been teaching for 20 years. I've had several interns and student teachers. I tell them that it's very important to have a vision for what you want your room to look and sound like. Do everything you can to make it that way! What I've found is that organization, routine, cooperative teams, high interest level, competition, positive peer pressure, and positive building expectations are the keys to successful behavior plans. If the building has high behavior expectations it makes my job a lot easier, but when it's a difficult building your room can still have high expectations. 
          I have a powerpoint that explains routine and expectations, I rotate pictures of students that are "mighty fine examples" of proper routine and behavior. I keep a "scoreboard" on the front whiteboard. It has 5 smiley faces down the side that indicate points for the class. I keep score of points at the top of the board- classes compete for the most points. There is no reward, they just want the points, and want to WIN. I don't know why it works, but it does. I keep it very simple- I am too busy for anything complicated.
          I also keep score of the time to beat for fastest clean up. My students are AWESOME at clean up because of this competition. Classes receive a DQ (disqualified) for any unsafe behavior. They want to win so badly that they keep each other in check. They are so used to this competition that they make quite elaborate cooperative plans to earn points- very funny and extremely clever sometimes. I have made videos of some of the best ideas to show other classes for incentive. 
          At the beginning of class we meet for "Artist Workshop Time", it lasts 5 minutes. We quickly address skills, concepts, history, and any ideas for best behavior. I expect students to encourage each other as artists, and as dilligent seekers of learning. I expect them to demand the best of themselves and each other.
          For the number of students I see this works out pretty well- not always though, bad days happen for everyone. Even the best kids can have a bad day. It's so smart to give a little, let a little bit go, have a sense of humor- it's an art to know when to simply ignore something. It's also so very important for students to know that you are on their side, you understand, you know they are great kids, and that you care about them. Never have a power struggle, and avoid backing a student into a a situation that they will resent. Always respect them and their value as member of their group. Have loads of fun and celebrate every little step!

          On Thu, May 10, 2012 at 4:44 PM, priorhouse <priorhouse@...> wrote:
           

          I also work with students using the verbal compliments that Cathy mentioned in her post. Like with a drawing lesson, as I walk the room I will say something like, "You nailed the lesson concept exactly!" Verbal praise - that is specific and authentic - is sometimes the best ind/class motivator. This year with a mixed age group - I went back to this old system of using a chart on the dry erase board that wrote in names for students that did certain jobs or just helped. throughout the year - I would say, go add your name to the board - and it really motivated and encouraged. the two oldest kids, I told them it was more geared for younger ones, but reminded them that it helped me see how much they did to help as well... and so if they could praticipate it would be appreciated. Respecting the students always begets more of a pleasant working bond as well.
          HTH

          ~Mrs. Prior


          > Then I walk around and say,
          > "Wow! You got that line so smooth!" and stuff like that. The others hear
          > that and want the inherent reward of doing it right.
          >
          > When someone is in process with a good result, I will often ask his/her
          > permission to pick it up and show it to the group and explain why it's
          > turning out so well. This is another inherent reward that they just love
          > and they work really hard to get things going well so I can demo with their
          > pieces.
          >
          > Cathy Wilson
          > Art and English Teacher
          > Carbon School District
          >




          --
          Keep Creating!
          Mrs. Garnett
          http://juliaspaintings.blogspot.com


        • Robin Mitchell
          Besides individual contact and praise...we have a local library that takes pieces and we announce names on our TV station and I do massive wall displays and
          Message 4 of 9 , May 12, 2012
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            Besides individual contact and praise...we have a local library that takes pieces and we announce names on our TV station and I do massive wall displays and tell them about the feedback.  All of it, including  the candy, helps....Finally....I do not grade on skill, but completion as that takes the pressure off of the kids who have it in their mind they cannot draw...etc...and push that they can keep an A by completing and trying...ofter they are very happily surprised by their results...hope this helps...Robin

            --- On Thu, 5/10/12, priorhouse <priorhouse@...> wrote:

            From: priorhouse <priorhouse@...>
            Subject: [art_education] Re: classroom rewards and consequences
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, May 10, 2012, 4:44 PM

             
            I also work with students using the verbal compliments that Cathy mentioned in her post. Like with a drawing lesson, as I walk the room I will say something like, "You nailed the lesson concept exactly!" Verbal praise - that is specific and authentic - is sometimes the best ind/class motivator. This year with a mixed age group - I went back to this old system of using a chart on the dry erase board that wrote in names for students that did certain jobs or just helped. throughout the year - I would say, go add your name to the board - and it really motivated and encouraged. the two oldest kids, I told them it was more geared for younger ones, but reminded them that it helped me see how much they did to help as well... and so if they could praticipate it would be appreciated. Respecting the students always begets more of a pleasant working bond as well.
            HTH

            ~Mrs. Prior

            > Then I walk around and say,
            > "Wow! You got that line so smooth!" and stuff like that. The others hear
            > that and want the inherent reward of doing it right.
            >
            > When someone is in process with a good result, I will often ask his/her
            > permission to pick it up and show it to the group and explain why it's
            > turning out so well. This is another inherent reward that they just love
            > and they work really hard to get things going well so I can demo with their
            > pieces.
            >
            > Cathy Wilson
            > Art and English Teacher
            > Carbon School District
            >

          • robinesp
            In our school by the main entrance we have a gallery where every month I choose 1 art piece from each class to hang for that month. The kids get a
            Message 5 of 9 , May 13, 2012
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              In our school by the main entrance we have a "gallery" where every month I choose 1 art piece from each class to hang for that month. The kids get a certificate announcing it. I try to rotate so the same students are not repeated. This is in addition to the displays in other parts of the school. The kids really look forward to seeing the new art and I think it encourages them to do their best. I try to have parents change it out too.
              Our school also gives out tickets for positive behaviors, the kids save them up and can buy stuff from a prize box in the library.
              In my classroom if there are continuous disrespect or disruption I place the kids in a time out or send them to another classroom for "recovery". The other teachers are VERY accommodating.
              For entire class rewards I offer a free choice day.
              Good luck!
              I have one more week of teaching before summer break!
              Robin in Colorado


              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "mallon_laurie" <mallon_laurie@...> wrote:
              >
              > I was interested to find out what great ways specialist record whole class behavior. Is it limited to stars on a chart to keep track of multiple classes? What types of awards do students receive as a whole group? Is special project time a reward?
              > If individuals are unable to follow directions what consequences do you have? Timeout? Materials removed?
              > Secondly, What successful ways have you celebrated an artist in each class? Rotating down the class list? Displaying individuals portfolio? Prizes? I want to inspire good behavior and highlight good effort but not have a behavior plan that is too complex to keep running consistently throughout the year.
              >
            • aliteachesart
              I used to do all of that stuff- sticker charts, prize drawings, certificates. I found it helped some kids, but then I would be trying to make it fair for
              Message 6 of 9 , May 14, 2012
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                I used to do all of that stuff- sticker charts, prize drawings, certificates. I found it helped some kids, but then I would be trying to make it fair for everyone to get a prize by the end of the year, or get a free art day... then I stopped doing all that and focused on clear expectations and directions- behavior problems solved! I write steps (with words and pictures) and post them at the board. Students refer and I can refer to the board, everyone works at their own pace. Classroom culture is one where kids help each other when finished, clean up, and then work on a drawing or spend time with the art and science books in the art room. I did have a noise control/behavior system of a green, yellow and red smilie face to remind them to keep to task. I'm not saying I didn't ever have bad days, but once I set everyone up for success they were/are successful. Also praise to the teacher at pick up time can work magic, and a call home now and then to excellent students is nice too.
                Fun awards like a sticker or a stamp on the hand are good, just make it a random thing. Let us know what you end up doing. ALi

                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "mallon_urie" <mallon_laurie@...> wrote:
                >
                > I was interested to find out what great ways specialist record whole class behavior. Is it limited to stars on a chart to keep track of multiple classes? What types of awards do students receive as a whole group? Is special project time a reward?
                > If individuals are unable to follow directions what consequences do you have? Timeout? Materials removed?
                > Secondly, What successful ways have you celebrated an artist in each class? Rotating down the class list? Displaying individuals portfolio? Prizes? I want to inspire good behavior and highlight good effort but not have a behavior plan that is too complex to keep running consistently throughout the year.
                >
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