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Re: Core Curriculum

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  • Rachel Stafford
    Cabarrus County art teachers are meeting monthly in our core groups. We are studying the new essential standards. Can t tell you much right now, but I think
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 7, 2011
      Cabarrus County art teachers are meeting monthly in our "core" groups. We are studying the new essential standards. Can't tell you much right now, but I think in the long run, there really isn't that much difference from the current standards, except that I think we might have a little more leeway in what we teach and at what levels. I think the powers that be are just reinventing the wheel (AGAIN). In five years, they'll do something else!

    • aliteachesart
      It is my understanding that (in NY anyway)non-tested subject areas need to teach two core lessons. I have interpreted this as teaching matting work as a math
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 18, 2011
        It is my understanding that (in NY anyway)non-tested subject areas need to teach two core lessons. I have interpreted this as teaching matting work as a math lesson, which it is. I am also having students do more "freewrites" in order to grow their comfort level in writing about art. We will do a more formal written art criticism latter in the year and present it for ELA. I had students do an art history presentation, but didn't spend enough time on the social studies to use that (in my opinion). It is my understanding that core is the basic, tested subjects students need to be proficient in to graduate with a diploma. My state is a race to the top state, so many things are changing in order to assess student progress and achievement. We are trying to do this without adding more standardized tests. My county art teachers are trying to work together to develop these assessments.
        Ali NNY

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Rachel Stafford <rachel.stafford@...> wrote:
        >
        > Cabarrus County art teachers are meeting monthly in our "core" groups. We are studying the new essential standards. Can't tell you much right now, but I think in the long run, there really isn't that much difference from the current standards, except that I think we might have a little more leeway in what we teach and at what levels. I think the powers that be are just reinventing the wheel (AGAIN). In five years, they'll do something else!
        >
      • Barbara
        I teach in GA, in a county which is also a Race to the Top district. I really don t know much about how the Common Core Curriculum and our Race to the Top
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 20, 2011
          I teach in GA, in a county which is also a Race to the Top district. I really don't know much about how the Common Core Curriculum and our Race to the Top grant will affect fine arts and other non-tested areas. My admin only shares info with grade levels, not meeting with art, music, and p.e. teachers yet. Either he doesn't know much about it yet, or he feels it's not necessary to roll it out with us yet, focusing on homeroom teachers who teach the core subjects. It's interesting to hear art teachers from other states describe how their program is changing due to the new educational directives for student achievement and teacher accountability. Please continue to share.

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "aliteachesart" <alexandrabenton.art@...> wrote:
          >
          > It is my understanding that (in NY anyway)non-tested subject areas need to teach two core lessons. I have interpreted this as teaching matting work as a math lesson, which it is. I am also having students do more "freewrites" in order to grow their comfort level in writing about art. We will do a more formal written art criticism latter in the year and present it for ELA. I had students do an art history presentation, but didn't spend enough time on the social studies to use that (in my opinion). It is my understanding that core is the basic, tested subjects students need to be proficient in to graduate with a diploma. My state is a race to the top state, so many things are changing in order to assess student progress and achievement. We are trying to do this without adding more standardized tests. My county art teachers are trying to work together to develop these assessments.
          > Ali NNY
          >
          > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Rachel Stafford <rachel.stafford@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Cabarrus County art teachers are meeting monthly in our "core" groups. We are studying the new essential standards. Can't tell you much right now, but I think in the long run, there really isn't that much difference from the current standards, except that I think we might have a little more leeway in what we teach and at what levels. I think the powers that be are just reinventing the wheel (AGAIN). In five years, they'll do something else!
          > >
          >
        • Kathy Maloney Johnson
          Can anyone suggest books about it? I am working on a Masters of Liberal Studies. We started by reading ancient Homer s Illiad and Greek Philosophy, then Roman,
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 20, 2011
            Can anyone suggest books about it? 

            I am working on a Masters of Liberal Studies. We started by reading ancient Homer's Illiad and Greek Philosophy, then Roman, pre-Christian, Christian writing... philosophy, literature and political theory. I think it's great for my sense as an artist to shore up a sense of the history of western culture.

            Is that the kind of connectedness this new way of teaching is supposed to include? It sounds like a very old way of teaching. 

            On Mon, Nov 7, 2011 at 1:40 PM, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
             

            It affects art ed greatly.  Art is supposed to support the spiral curriculum of

            culture, math, etc.  Core gives art masterpieces to be taught (by you or homerm).
            Core teaches appreciation and knowledge of images.  your job is to interweave
            your mandatory curriculum into theirs, i.e. Egyptian culture or crossing the Delaware with line
            or media. It is a different way of teaching.  k

            On Nov 6, 2011, at 2:50 PM, mariannaD wrote:

            Hi-- You may have all discussed this new change in teaching and I have missed it. How will this affect the Fine Arts?





            --
            Kathy Maloney Johnson
            Art Teacher
            Painter
            Dressmaker
          • Kathleen Maledon
            Hirsh s Cultural Literacy book is kind of like a backbone of core. k
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 20, 2011
              Hirsh's Cultural Literacy book is kind of like a backbone of core. k
              On Nov 20, 2011, at 7:39 PM, Kathy Maloney Johnson wrote:

              Can anyone suggest books about it? 


              I am working on a Masters of Liberal Studies. We started by reading ancient Homer's Illiad and Greek Philosophy, then Roman, pre-Christian, Christian writing... philosophy, literature and political theory. I think it's great for my sense as an artist to shore up a sense of the history of western culture.

              Is that the kind of connectedness this new way of teaching is supposed to include? It sounds like a very old way of teaching. 

              On Mon, Nov 7, 2011 at 1:40 PM, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
               

              It affects art ed greatly.  Art is supposed to support the spiral curriculum of

              culture, math, etc.  Core gives art masterpieces to be taught (by you or homerm).
              Core teaches appreciation and knowledge of images.  your job is to interweave
              your mandatory curriculum into theirs, i.e. Egyptian culture or crossing the Delaware with line
              or media. It is a different way of teaching.  k

              On Nov 6, 2011, at 2:50 PM, mariannaD wrote:

              Hi-- You may have all discussed this new change in teaching and I have missed it. How will this affect the Fine Arts?






              -- 
              Kathy Maloney Johnson
              Art Teacher
              Painter 
              Dressmaker


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