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Re: [art_education] Art Grades 6-8 Homework

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  • MARYANN KOHL
    You can give them homework like... Look for circles in the city or in nature. Then for a moment, when the kids come in the room, ask them to report on what
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 20, 2011
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      You can give them homework like... "Look for circles in the city or in nature."
      Then for a moment, when the kids come in the room, ask them to report on what they saw.
      Or, other 'artsy' assignments. It doesn't have to be written.
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
      MaryAnn F. Kohl
      360 592 9201
      blog: maryannfkohl.typepad.com/blog
      IBPA Board of Directors
      Barnes & Noble Parents' Expert Circle

      On Oct 20, 2011, at 11:15 AM, A. Thielke wrote:

       

      I have been instructed by my boss to give each class homework each
      time I see them. I see most of my classes only once a week. To give
      them homework seems like a great way to set them up to fail. I teach
      in a high needs low income nyc public school. The students do not do
      their homework in their "core" classes let alone in non tested
      subjects.

      I create my lessons so that we break large projects up into chunks we
      can handle in 40 minutes. We have to have the kids come in and record
      the learning object and standards and then complete a do now before
      getting into a "mini lesson". With supply set up and clean up we
      aren't left with much time to do any actual work.

      I have given the students folders and paper that I bought with my own
      money so that they can keep their work organized and in the classroom.
      I do not have to deal with anyone losing their project, notebook or
      saying that they can't afford to buy one. Everyone has what they need
      to do the work. I try to keep the battles at a minimum. Now, that I
      will be adding homework to the docket, I am not sure how to implement
      it.

      My Assistant Principal said that the homework didnt have to be much or
      hard. I asked why we needed to bother then. She is obviously only
      requiring that there be homework in visual art to appeal to the
      bowers-that-be rather than considering our students situations. Now on
      top of teaching 200+ students and keeping tack of whether or not they
      recorded the LO and did classwork I have to look at and grade
      homework.

      What kind of homework should I be giving? What is realistic? Ideally,
      I'd like to give homework that is related to what we work on in class.
      However, I cannot count on the homework being done so I cannot count
      on it to help supplement the classwork. (Ie: I cannot ask them to do a
      planning drawing for hw and then use their hw in class for the next
      step. If they do not do it, then they are behind and I have several
      students at different points in the lesson. I've tried it, it's
      miserable. This is not an ideal school or situation.) I was thinking
      I'd require them to complete a drawing to hand in each day. I could
      tally how many drawings that were done with effort for their homework
      grade. Does this sound reasonable? What do you do?

      Thanks,
      Angela


    • catyo55
      Sounds tricky Angela! In the past when I taught middle school, I required students to do one thing in their sketchbook per week. It could be a drawing, a
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 21, 2011
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        Sounds tricky Angela! In the past when I taught middle school, I required students to do one thing in their sketchbook per week. It could be a drawing, a collage, a journal entry, a picture that they took with a written description about it, etc. My main goal was to get kids to notice that there is art around them and to think about art when they were outside of the art room. I graded them on effort, thoughtfulness, and completion. You could get even more creative and specific and suggest things like bring in a food wrapper that has an interesting design, cut a picture out of a magazine that shows complementary colors, etc.

        My students had sketchbooks and I would collect them and grade the homework roughly once a month, but you could always have your students turn in their homework each class and then after you grade it, they could add it to the folder that they already have in your class.

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "A. Thielke" wrote:
        >
        > I have been instructed by my boss to give each class homework each
        > time I see them. I see most of my classes only once a week. To give
        > them homework seems like a great way to set them up to fail. I teach
        > in a high needs low income nyc public school. The students do not do
        > their homework in their "core" classes let alone in non tested
        > subjects.
        >
        > I create my lessons so that we break large projects up into chunks we
        > can handle in 40 minutes. We have to have the kids come in and record
        > the learning object and standards and then complete a do now before
        > getting into a "mini lesson". With supply set up and clean up we
        > aren't left with much time to do any actual work.
        >
        > I have given the students folders and paper that I bought with my own
        > money so that they can keep their work organized and in the classroom.
        > I do not have to deal with anyone losing their project, notebook or
        > saying that they can't afford to buy one. Everyone has what they need
        > to do the work. I try to keep the battles at a minimum. Now, that I
        > will be adding homework to the docket, I am not sure how to implement
        > it.
        >
        > My Assistant Principal said that the homework didnt have to be much or
        > hard. I asked why we needed to bother then. She is obviously only
        > requiring that there be homework in visual art to appeal to the
        > bowers-that-be rather than considering our students situations. Now on
        > top of teaching 200+ students and keeping tack of whether or not they
        > recorded the LO and did classwork I have to look at and grade
        > homework.
        >
        > What kind of homework should I be giving? What is realistic? Ideally,
        > I'd like to give homework that is related to what we work on in class.
        > However, I cannot count on the homework being done so I cannot count
        > on it to help supplement the classwork. (Ie: I cannot ask them to do a
        > planning drawing for hw and then use their hw in class for the next
        > step. If they do not do it, then they are behind and I have several
        > students at different points in the lesson. I've tried it, it's
        > miserable. This is not an ideal school or situation.) I was thinking
        > I'd require them to complete a drawing to hand in each day. I could
        > tally how many drawings that were done with effort for their homework
        > grade. Does this sound reasonable? What do you do?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Angela
        >
      • aliteachesart
        Hi Angela, I have always had difficulties getting all students to do their homework too. Can you make worksheets? If you give your students a complete the
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 4, 2011
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          Hi Angela,

          I have always had difficulties getting all students to do their homework too. Can you make worksheets? If you give your students a complete the picture page, a word jumble with vocabulary, an idea generator (something simple and fun) they will be more apt to do it. Open ended answers that are short and basic review will help you plan lessons after you grade it. Give a reward for doing it, like four in a row and they can chew gum in class (teachers in my building give lollipops- though I don't do this) or a sticker or free choice day. If they clean up early they could do their homework right in class too.
          Good Luck, ALi
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