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Re: High School Help!

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  • Brandy
    My observations of highschoolers is that most are more concerned with doing it wrong/ not getting it right than fishing and growing as an artist. Like all
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 17, 2011
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      My observations of highschoolers is that most are more concerned with doing it wrong/ not getting it right than fishing and growing as an artist. Like all their other subjects, if they can't understand it (ie. how to do it) they tend to withdraw, not finish, and talk a lot more.
      If that were my class, I would assume they were not comfortable with that kind of work yet. It seems like an activity they might need a few months incubation for. In my hs classes, we don't do a lot of "show and tell" the first couple of months. They are still vulnerable and decently concerned with looking bad to their peers and sharing activities that are meant to encourage growth seem to inhibit them if they feel they will have to show their work at all. I know, because they were so excited to show everything they drew as young children right- but that was then.
      I would go ahead with the drawing faces activities if you are actively teaching specific techniques and not taking a relaxed, observational approach to the face drawing. Helping them improve on their faces and hands will take them yards ahead and prepare them for the whole body drawing exercises- both in confidence and ability. Hands are as tricky and just as expressive as faces. They also tend to be the thing in a drawing that people can't draw as well right away.
      Good luck,
      Brandy
      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "aliteachesart" <alexandrabenton.art@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Everybody,
      >
      > I've been switched to the high school this year, and have been really happy with the way my classes are going until today. We're doing a mini drawing course in my intro class and drawing/painting. I've been doing Betty Edwards activities to get them to really see and make the switch to the right brain and its been working well. Today they switched to charcoal and drew their first model- it didn't go too well. Some barely tried others did better observational drawings in elementary school (I know I was their teacher), others started off strong and petered out after about 15 minutes (they had about 35). I'm switching the rest of the day to gesture drawings, but had planned to get into facial portraiture next week and now I'm not sure. Are they burned out on drawing? Advice is needed! Arg! ALi 9-12 NNY
      >
    • Miki Rodriguez
      Charcoal is difficult because they need lots of practice for details. Perhaps instead of marathon practice they can get shorter spurts of charcoal. If 15 is
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 18, 2011
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        Charcoal is difficult because they need lots of practice for details. Perhaps instead of marathon practice they can get shorter spurts of charcoal. If 15 is their max out, try 10-15 so that they can see the end ahead. You could also try simpler subjects but expect more observational skills, like light and shadows, values, blending, etc. When they've mastered this with some success, progress towards the next level of expertise at your disgression.
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