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List your Middle School Kid Art Motivators

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  • Judy Decker
    (Marcia - I will get them to you) Dear Art Educators, Marcia Lavery posted a great question to Getty list... I would LOVE to see your ideas listed.... Yes -
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 4, 2004
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      (Marcia - I will get them to you)

      Dear Art Educators,

      Marcia Lavery posted a great question to Getty list... I would LOVE to see
      your ideas listed.... Yes - they may appear in my e-Book but I will not take
      credit for them....and my book is not for sale - so no need to worry - Share
      freely!

      My greatest motivators were when we did a real projects that real artists
      would do. My kiddles loved to be treated as adults when it came to art
      projects. Sculptures - ceramics - assemblages were all great motivators. My
      motivators were things about them and their interests. I will look at my
      lesson plans that I do have on the site and see if any of them were a bust -
      other wise they were ALL great motivators. I had REAL artists (past and
      present) to connect with each lesson. Our artists weren't all dead.

      Do check out Bunki Kramer's site and Woody Duncan's site - both are/were
      great motivators. Bunki's student work will just amaze you. She has high
      expectations too. Her kiddles come to her with NO elementary art background.

      Middle school kids are motivated when they have choices too (smile).
      They don't all like doing the same thing the same way. Challenge them.

      Here are Marcia's:

      Some of my kid's motivators are:

      Logos: a short project, but kids loved to make a symbol for themselves or
      for their pretend company. We talked a little about graphic designers.

      Animals: kids loved the animal painting project we did (choosing an animal
      picture from a book or photo to paint). I showed them how to make it look
      more realistic by using the fan brushes to create textured fur or feathers.
      We also made animal clay sculptures in the style of Pre-Columbian animal
      vessels.

      CD covers: always a good sub project

      Op-Art: the 8th graders loved the op-art designs of Bridget Riley and we
      made our own.

      Funky Fish paper mache puppets: the 8th graders made an imaginative, unusual
      fish puppet sculptures. They especially liked using the paint markers to
      make patterns and designs on their fish.

      Toys and flowers: I just started a still life project with my 7th grade
      class. I had a box of stuff they could pick from and drawing toys seemed to
      be a hit! My brother had a bunch of old action figures and other toys that
      the boys enjoyed drawing. Many of the girls picked the plastic flowers to
      draw. We are going to start painting them with watercolor tomorrow.

      I seem to be using the same ideas a lot though, what other themes/subjects
      are motivating?

      Note: Marcia - SPORTS motivates all middlers.

      Judy Decker - Ohio
      Incredible Art Department
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
      Incredible Art Resources
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
    • smjahnle@aol.com
      You could have heard a pin drop in my 7th and 8th grade classes recently; they were concentrating so hard! Pencil value studies: Took a b & w magazine photo,
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 5, 2004
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        You could have heard a pin drop in my 7th and 8th grade classes recently; they were concentrating so hard!  Pencil value studies: Took a b & w magazine photo, cut it in half, and asked the students to draw the other half in ebony pencil.  Another day they used watercolor washes of one color (black, brown, and blues worked best) to recreate their b & w photos.  In both cases, we did value gradation scales first.  Even had them use tempera paint 0 only black and white) and see how many shades of grays they could mix.  Sandy J
      • Pam
        I just observed a value study lesson that one of my student teachers presented. This was to a group of high school Art I students. After making value charts
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 5, 2004
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          I just observed a value study lesson that one of my student teachers presented.  This was to a group of high school Art I students. 
           
          After making value charts with chalks, students then applied the concepts they'd learned by creating an ideal landscape.  First a photographic landscape was located in a magazine.  The photographic landscapes had to demonstrate how colors make objects appear to advance/recede.  Students then picked the most interesting portion of the landscape photo and cut it into a square or rectangle of no more than about 4" x 5".  The cut-out was glued to a larger piece of drawing paper and students completed the image in an "ideal" way while also showing value ranges of key colors. 
           
          The finished products were amazingly beautiful and inventive while still being a value study.
           
          Pam
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, April 05, 2004 12:35 PM
          Subject: Re: [art_education] List your Middle School Kid Art Motivators

          You could have heard a pin drop in my 7th and 8th grade classes recently; they were concentrating so hard!  Pencil value studies: Took a b & w magazine photo, cut it in half, and asked the students to draw the other half in ebony pencil.  Another day they used watercolor washes of one color (black, brown, and blues worked best) to recreate their b & w photos.  In both cases, we did value gradation scales first.  Even had them use tempera paint 0 only black and white) and see how many shades of grays they could mix.  Sandy J

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