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Re: [art_education] White - Science vs. Pigments

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  • cmaria
    White is tricky... Kids would always argue with me and I felt in some ways they had a point, at least semantically. However, I just said two sentences. White
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 4, 2004
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      White is tricky...
      Kids would always argue with me and I felt in some ways they had a
      point, at least semantically.
      However, I just said two sentences.
      White had no color and
      Black had all colors...
      However, some 'Weisenheimer' would always come up and tell me that all
      colors mixed together became brown. or that absence of all colors meant
      clear...oh, well..:)
      all I could say, than you did not mix them perfectly..:)
      C-M
    • donhoffmann
      Don t forget about reflected colors. Sometimes we see the color of what the object actually is. Other times we see the colors that are reflected off the
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 4, 2004
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        Don't forget about reflected colors. Sometimes we see the color of what the object actually is. Other times we see the colors that are reflected off the object. In particular, translucent colors off insects.
         
        I just did a lesson plan on this with 1st and 2nd grade I got off the crayola website.
         
        I'll have to try this and see if it has any merit, but as far as explaining artistic white as lacking color,  you could show it with various forms of paper. Start with white paper, paint a swatch of red on it. Ask them if it has changed color. Then paint other colors of papers and show how the paper had changed the red into something different. Since it will, you could therefore come to the conclusion that white has no color in it.

        Kelli - I'm sending this to the other lists too. Good question!

        How do you explain White to kids?

        Way to go! Bring in science AND pigments color theory. My kiddies always
        liked telling me I was wrong after they had their science lesson...SO I
        started teaching BOTH in my class.

        White in science:  reflection of nearly all light from all visible
        wavelength (so yes all colors - BUT all reflected)
        White in pigments: lacking any color or hue
        Black in pigments: theoretically all colors added -- and in science all
        colors absorbed - no reflected light. (and folks who like watercolors -
        black is "evil" --grin - I didn't use black in my watercolors)
        Microsoft® Encarta® Reference Library 2003 will back me up.
        See Artlex for white pigments (what makes white). Titanium oxide (this is
        what I used in Acrylics) and Zinc oxide (Chinese white in watercolors) are
        two that I know of. White glaze has whiting - Kaolin, tin oxides...Any clay
        people out there to back me up on what makes white in glazes? LOTS of
        science (and MATH) there folks.

        Always try to tie in science when you do color theory....Try to team up when
        science is doing color...I know that is hard to do.

        Judy Decker - Ohio
        Incredible Art Department
        http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
        Incredible Art Resources
        http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/


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