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Re: [art_education] anime and graffiti

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  • Kathleen Maledon
    basquiet is the name artist, I think, that could be spotlighted. k
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
      basquiet is the name artist, I think, that could be spotlighted. k
      On Jul 24, 2011, at 10:35 AM, D Rickard wrote:


      isn't there a particular artist that does mostly graffiti?  also, those new "sidewalk" artists are cool to study.  anime is cartooning, studying that can be funa as well.  getting into emotions, why anime is drawn the way it is etc.  
       
      Dawn
      Sometimes the best things in life only come after you have totally given up trying to make things happen yourself.  Let go and let God.

      From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...>
      To: "art_education@yahoogroups.com" <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2011 8:51 AM
      Subject: Re: [art_education] anime and graffiti

       
      Steph,

      Graffiti is a language, a cultural language. Your students choose to do this because this is the way they communicate with in their cultural context.  It would be good to bring in a law enforcement person who deals with graffiti and have him explain this "language" to you or to your students.  He can explain what it all means, symbols, tagging etc.  If the students know you know what they are writing and doing it takes the mystery out of it.  Again this is a teachable moment.  I think your principal would agree that there probably is a need to demystify the practice of graffiti.   Bring up the difference between graffiti for art sake and for "gang" sake, purpose, tagging, territory defined.  It has been found that when graffiti is defined for young people, what it is, purpose, "understanding" of symbols used you will see less of it coming up in the classroom.  "You" become in the know, that worries students when the teacher/administration is on the same level of the student "think".  You have been empowered.   I am not discounting your struggle in the classroom but I have found when barriers are broken down, secrets revealed, language on the same level is provided students and teachers can work in a more collaborative manner more success takes place in the classroom.

      Another thing we did was bring in law enforcement experts on graffiti to help staff understand the graffiti language to be advised what was appropriate and not appropriate.  This was very helpful in discussion with students. Identifying images that might appear on lockers, in lockers, on notebooks, within their artwork.  It is easier to tell a student what is appropriate and not appropriate when you have context to go by.



       
      On 7/23/2011 1:07 PM, Jeff Pridie wrote:
       
      Its not dealing with it is engaging them in something they find interest in.  How much do they really know about anime and graffiti art? Are they just duplicating/copying the form or do they really understand the principles behind anime and graffiti? How can they relate to their own lives? What kind of stories does anime and graffiti tell for them?  This is a teachable moment? By engaging them in the art forms it may demystify it that there is more to it then they realize. How can studying this connect them to their assignments, the curriculum and make them learn something by going through the backdoor.  
      Jeff



       
      How do deal with anime and graffiti drawing in a high school class 
      room? Instead of working on assignments they prefer to do that instead.


      Thank you for your input.  Most of our graffiti is based on gangs...I am not sure that is something my principal wants me to be discussing especially when we are in the drug trafficking corridor.

      Stephanie






    • Miki Rodriguez
      Wonderful...I couldn t have said it better, a teachable moment. They can create their own design based on the new knowledge. Example assignment-create your own
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
        Wonderful...I couldn't have said it better, a teachable moment. They can create their own design based on the new knowledge. Example assignment-create your own anime (graffiti) design based on your own life. Tell us something about yourself in symbolic terms. Homework: Find something interesting about anime or graffiti that most of us don't know. Use the internet as your source.
      • Brandy
        I don t have gang symbols in my classes, so I also speak from an area of naivete, but teaching them a symbolism unit would seem to strike up their alley of
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
          I don't have gang symbols in my classes, so I also speak from an area of naivete, but teaching them a symbolism unit would seem to strike up their alley of interest. I have taught this until before, and it was well received by older students. You can use the "dictionary of symbols", search for Hobo symbolism on line, color symbolism (particularly fascinating to me), family crests, and Symbolism of the dollar; A particular favorite of my students. I have noticed student use color more carefully and add more objects of meaning to their pieces after this unit.
          Perhaps because I am not generally surrounded by images that are contraband by my admins, but I let each artist pick their "thing".
          George Rodrigue painted a blue dog for YEARS. Nothing but paintings of this tranced out, trippy blue dog, and he's famous for it. You see a blue dog, and it's a Rodrigue or someone imitating him. He owns it. I created a lovely tessellation for a show on justice, and everyone who saw it said the same thing, "oh, that's like that artist who does these.", even though Escher did not invent tessellations and mine was a complete original.
          So let them own their graffiti , but make the deal that any gang symbols, or other copied images, will be confiscated. They have to be artists, which means having original, creative thoughts and ideas. Frauds will be thrown in "jail" (the art piece, not the maker) and later destroyed, just like other fraudulent pieces of art.
          I had this one student who did every single assignment- no kidding every one- about the three crosses on hill. She made silk designs, impressionistic paintings, a topiary and charcoal drawings of three crosses. It became really cool by the end of the year. I don't have subjects my kids do, I have a material or a style and let the artist pick the subject. It has to be relevant to them or it's not art- not their art anyway.
          Good luck connecting to your students next year,
          Brandy

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
          >
          > haven't taught hs, but can't they have a lesson on it and then call it
          > quits? k
          > On Jul 23, 2011, at 10:53 AM, Steph Walkley wrote:
          >
          > > How do deal with anime and graffiti drawing in a high school class
          > > room? Instead of working on assignments they prefer to do that
          > > instead.
          > >
          > >
          >
        • MARYANN KOHL
          Keith Haring was amazing when he began with his own kind of grafitti ... read up on his biography and how he made all of NY City love his work, not hate it. .
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
            Keith Haring was amazing when he began with his own kind of grafitti ... read up on his biography and how he made all of NY City love his work, not hate it.

            . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
            MaryAnn 
            On Jul 24, 2011, at 10:35 AM, D Rickard wrote:

             

            isn't there a particular artist that does mostly graffiti?  also, those new "sidewalk" artists are cool to study.  anime is cartooning, studying that can be funa as well.  getting into emotions, why anime is drawn the way it is etc. 
             
            Dawn
            Sometimes the best things in life only come after you have totally given up trying to make things happen yourself.  Let go and let God.

            From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...>
            To: "art_education@yahoogroups.com" <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2011 8:51 AM
            Subject: Re: [art_education] anime and graffiti

             
            Steph,

            Graffiti is a language, a cultural language. Your students choose to do this because this is the way they communicate with in their cultural context.  It would be good to bring in a law enforcement person who deals with graffiti and have him explain this "language" to you or to your students.  He can explain what it all means, symbols, tagging etc.  If the students know you know what they are writing and doing it takes the mystery out of it.  Again this is a teachable moment.  I think your principal would agree that there probably is a need to demystify the practice of graffiti.   Bring up the difference between graffiti for art sake and for "gang" sake, purpose, tagging, territory defined.  It has been found that when graffiti is defined for young people, what it is, purpose, "understanding" of symbols used you will see less of it coming up in the classroom.  "You" become in the know, that worries students when the teacher/administration is on the same level of the student "think".  You have been empowered.   I am not discounting your struggle in the classroom but I have found when barriers are broken down, secrets revealed, language on the same level is provided students and teachers can work in a more collaborative manner more success takes place in the classroom.

            Another thing we did was bring in law enforcement experts on graffiti to help staff understand the graffiti language to be advised what was appropriate and not appropriate.  This was very helpful in discussion with students. Identifying images that might appear on lockers, in lockers, on notebooks, within their artwork.  It is easier to tell a student what is appropriate and not appropriate when you have context to go by.



             
            On 7/23/2011 1:07 PM, Jeff Pridie wrote:
             
            Its not dealing with it is engaging them in something they find interest in.  How much do they really know about anime and graffiti art? Are they just duplicating/copying the form or do they really understand the principles behind anime and graffiti? How can they relate to their own lives? What kind of stories does anime and graffiti tell for them?  This is a teachable moment? By engaging them in the art forms it may demystify it that there is more to it then they realize. How can studying this connect them to their assignments, the curriculum and make them learn something by going through the backdoor.  
            Jeff



             
            How do deal with anime and graffiti drawing in a high school class
            room? Instead of working on assignments they prefer to do that instead.


            Thank you for your input.  Most of our graffiti is based on gangs...I am not sure that is something my principal wants me to be discussing especially when we are in the drug trafficking corridor.

            Stephanie






          • Frank Ayala
            I ve done several lessons on graffiti. It seems to me. That some of society is not ready to embrace graffiti as an art form. Students are comfortable with
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
              I've done several lessons on graffiti. It seems to me. That some of society is not ready to embrace graffiti as an art form. Students are comfortable with this " new" art. It is used in fashion and as a design form on all kinds of items ( skateboards, video games, etc). Yes graffiti is also found in galleries through the world. It is an interesting and challenging form of art. Yes! Gangs may use it, but they don't own it. I tell my students that their graffiti cannot be gang affiliated. It is not hard to tell the difference. Where I work, gangs like to use old English fonts but that doesn't make old english lettering gang related. I'm not one to let gangs have art forms and I tell my students. I've had students create beautiful artwork utilizing graffiti. Many of the elements of art are there Line. Color..shape....value...form. And texture. Remember, it took society around a hundred years to accept the atrocities to formal art that the impressionists did. Now I ask you, who really needs schooling Not all graffiti is gang related.
              Knarf


              Sent from my iPad
            • D Rickard
              there were also possible symbols in the underground railroad.  that can lead into a unit on quilts. Dawn http://mdawnr.blogspot.com/ Sometimes the best things
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
                there were also possible symbols in the underground railroad.  that can lead into a unit on quilts.
                 
                Dawn
                Sometimes the best things in life only come after you have totally given up trying to make things happen yourself.  Let go and let God.

                From: Brandy <bergiemoore@...>
                To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2011 4:39 PM
                Subject: [art_education] Re: anime and graffiti

                 
                I don't have gang symbols in my classes, so I also speak from an area of naivete, but teaching them a symbolism unit would seem to strike up their alley of interest. I have taught this until before, and it was well received by older students. You can use the "dictionary of symbols", search for Hobo symbolism on line, color symbolism (particularly fascinating to me), family crests, and Symbolism of the dollar; A particular favorite of my students. I have noticed student use color more carefully and add more objects of meaning to their pieces after this unit.
                Perhaps because I am not generally surrounded by images that are contraband by my admins, but I let each artist pick their "thing".
                George Rodrigue painted a blue dog for YEARS. Nothing but paintings of this tranced out, trippy blue dog, and he's famous for it. You see a blue dog, and it's a Rodrigue or someone imitating him. He owns it. I created a lovely tessellation for a show on justice, and everyone who saw it said the same thing, "oh, that's like that artist who does these.", even though Escher did not invent tessellations and mine was a complete original.
                So let them own their graffiti , but make the deal that any gang symbols, or other copied images, will be confiscated. They have to be artists, which means having original, creative thoughts and ideas. Frauds will be thrown in "jail" (the art piece, not the maker) and later destroyed, just like other fraudulent pieces of art.
                I had this one student who did every single assignment- no kidding every one- about the three crosses on hill. She made silk designs, impressionistic paintings, a topiary and charcoal drawings of three crosses. It became really cool by the end of the year. I don't have subjects my kids do, I have a material or a style and let the artist pick the subject. It has to be relevant to them or it's not art- not their art anyway.
                Good luck connecting to your students next year,
                Brandy

                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
                >
                > haven't taught hs, but can't they have a lesson on it and then call it
                > quits? k
                > On Jul 23, 2011, at 10:53 AM, Steph Walkley wrote:
                >
                > > How do deal with anime and graffiti drawing in a high school class
                > > room? Instead of working on assignments they prefer to do that
                > > instead.
                > >
                > >
                >



              • Andrew Darlow
                Speaking of graffiti and outdoor art, I just came across this fantastic website that highlights a lot of outdoor art projects:
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
                  Speaking of graffiti and outdoor art, I just came across this fantastic website that highlights a lot of outdoor art projects:


                  All the best,

                  Andrew


                  Andrew Darlow
                  Editor, The Imaging Buffet
                  Author, 301 Inkjet Tips and Techniques:
                  An Essential Printing Resource for Photographers - http://www.inkjettips.com
                  and
                  Pet Photography 101: 
                  Tips for Taking Better Photos of Your Dog or Cat - http://www.PhotoPetTips.com


                  On Jul 24, 2011, at 5:57 PM, Frank Ayala wrote:

                   

                  I've done several lessons on graffiti. It seems to me. That some of society is not ready to embrace graffiti as an art form. Students are comfortable with this " new" art. It is used in fashion and as a design form on all kinds of items ( skateboards, video games, etc). Yes graffiti is also found in galleries through the world. It is an interesting and challenging form of art. Yes! Gangs may use it, but they don't own it. I tell my students that their graffiti cannot be gang affiliated. It is not hard to tell the difference. Where I work, gangs like to use old English fonts but that doesn't make old english lettering gang related. I'm not one to let gangs have art forms and I tell my students. I've had students create beautiful artwork utilizing graffiti. Many of the elements of art are there Line. Color..shape....value...form. And texture. Remember, it took society around a hundred years to accept the atrocities to formal art that the impressionists did. Now I ask you, who really needs schooling Not all graffiti is gang related.
                  Knarf






                • subirdsings
                  Through out my whole teaching career, I have had students interested in both Graffiti and anime. My first year teaching I had to gangster type kids who were
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 26, 2011
                    Through out my whole teaching career, I have had students interested in both Graffiti and anime.

                    My first year teaching I had to "gangster" type kids who were very hard to deal with, they were not interested in my lessons. I asked them what they were interested in. They told me cartoons and graffiti. I went out and bought books on both, I brought them back and gave these two guys some guidelines and they became much more interested in class and art. They came up with beautiful ideas and fun cartoons. They even moved up close to my desk area and became my "protectors" (I had 40 kids in that class).

                    This year for our activity day, I had the whole 11th grade class come up with graffiti ideas and we were allowed to create graffiti art on the walls beside our cafeteria. The students loved this. I showed them Haring and other graffiti/mural artists online before we started.

                    There are also many lessons and teachable moments, my advice: integrate; give the students boundaries and guild lines, but give time to these two genres and your students will be responsive and happy.

                    cheers,
                    Sue

                    --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Steph Walkley <swalkley@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > How do deal with anime and graffiti drawing in a high school class
                    > room? Instead of working on assignments they prefer to do that instead.
                    >
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