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Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

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  • Susun Gallery
    Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning. I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids. The Right Side of the Brain book,
    Message 1 of 28 , Jun 25, 2011
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      Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.

      The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll love they're results.

      Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.

      There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
      The best to you in Art.
      Susun Gallery


      On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:

       

      :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
      >
      > Who can direct me to some good resources?
      >
      > Thanks and have a great weekend,
      >
      > Lauren
      >
      > Lauren R. Perlman
      > Founder/Director
      > Mummies and Masterpieces
      > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
      >
      >
      > Sent from my iPhone
      >
      > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
      > Good luck, Robin
      >


    • Jody Gore
      Monica Brookes book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have tried her techniques and
      Message 2 of 28 , Jun 25, 2011
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        Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle, regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
         
        Jody Gore
        DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
        318-858-2444
        Secretary 
         
         
         
         
         
         

        From: Susun Gallery <susungallery@...>
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
        Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

         
        Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.

        The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll love they're results.

        Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.

        There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
        The best to you in Art.
        Susun Gallery


        On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:

         
        :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
        >
        > Who can direct me to some good resources?
        >
        > Thanks and have a great weekend,
        >
        > Lauren
        >
        > Lauren R. Perlman
        > Founder/Director
        > Mummies and Masterpieces
        > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
        >
        >
        > Sent from my iPhone
        >
        > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
        > Good luck, Robin
        >




      • Julie Casebourn
        Amen Jody, I feel the same way.  ________________________________ From: Jody Gore To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 28 , Jun 25, 2011
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          Amen Jody, I feel the same way. 


          From: Jody Gore <jody_gore@...>
          To: "art_education@yahoogroups.com" <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sat, June 25, 2011 5:15:04 PM
          Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

           

          Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle, regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
           
          Jody Gore
          DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
          318-858-2444 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              318-858-2444      end_of_the_skype_highlighting
          Secretary 
           
           
           
           
           
           

          From: Susun Gallery <susungallery@...>
          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
          Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

           
          Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.

          The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll love they're results.

          Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.

          There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
          The best to you in Art.
          Susun Gallery


          On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:

           
          :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
          >
          > Who can direct me to some good resources?
          >
          > Thanks and have a great weekend,
          >
          > Lauren
          >
          > Lauren R. Perlman
          > Founder/Director
          > Mummies and Masterpieces
          > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
          >
          >
          > Sent from my iPhone
          >
          > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
          > Good luck, Robin
          >




        • Brandy
          I love Drawing on the right side of the brain, Drawing with Kids, and no has mentioned my last favorite- KEYS to DRAWING.
          Message 4 of 28 , Jun 26, 2011
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            I love Drawing on the right side of the brain, Drawing with Kids, and no has mentioned my last favorite- KEYS to DRAWING.
            http://www.amazon.com/Keys-Drawing-Bert-Dodson/dp/0891343377/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1309095054&sr=8-1
            It has drawing exercises, all kinds, which I enjoy exploring with the kids, and then teaches students to ask themselves questions about their drawing. I think it does a great job of getting people to THINK like artists, which can be one of the biggest hurdles to actually drawing like an artist. It has taught my students to be kind in criticism to both themselves and others and once they do that, their art really takes off.
            I definitely think you could use these techniques with 7 -10 yr olds ( I do :).
            Regards,
            Brandy

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
            >
            > Who can direct me to some good resources?
            >
            > Thanks and have a great weekend,
            >
            > Lauren
            >
            > Lauren R. Perlman
            > Founder/Director
            > Mummies and Masterpieces
            > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
            >
            >
            > Sent from my iPhone
            >
            > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
            > Good luck, Robin
            >
          • Joyce Rainwalker
            While I don t use Brookes book, I think you ve hit on a crucial point, Jody. I don t use the term, talent in my work with artists any more. I ve replaced it
            Message 5 of 28 , Jun 26, 2011
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              While I don't use Brookes' book, I think you've hit on a crucial
              point, Jody. I don't use the term, "talent" in my work with artists
              any more. I've replaced it with "skill" and emphasize it much like
              you do. We talk about how targeted practice makes a difference in
              soccer, baseball, and guitar lessons. I've found it's even more
              important to draw a parallel to other curriculum areas, too. How
              many attempts did it take until you were at ease with arithmetic
              algorithms? -With the rules of grammar or writing a paragraph? -With
              spelling the days of the week? If we treated mathematics like we do
              art and said things like, "Well, he just doesn't have the math
              talent in his family, but you should see how his sister can count!"
              we'd notice the incongruity, but you're right - there has always
              been a mystique about art. That's not to say there is genius in some
              artists (speaking of drawing *and* differential equations) but we
              can have a reasonable expectation of success with hard work and
              steady, patient practice.

              I don't even cut parents any slack now. When someone visits -
              usually with one of my students in tow - and says something like
              "I've never been able to draw - they gave up on me when I was six" I
              respond with, "It's never too late. Art is a skill just like
              reading, writing, and arithmetic. Join us in our studios for a
              session or two and we (your child and I) will show you!" Everything
              is more fun after a little practice.

              Because I'm a constructivist who uses Teaching for Artistic Behavior
              (TAB) pedagogy in our studio, I focus on sharing lots of different
              techniques and skills with my students rather than using specific
              projects. Even then, when I sit in one of our mini-studios and do
              art of my own (rare, both because there's so little time to sit and
              I avoid providing a single model for kids), some little one will
              give me a, "Wow - that's good. You're an artist!" My stock response
              is always, "Thank you. We're all artists and I've practiced for
              years. Wait until you see what you can do when you're 103 like me!"

              Like you, I want children to realize that the magic of artistry is
              made up of equal parts of persistence, attention, and practice.

              Joyce
              ...........
              K-5 Art Specialist
              http://EvergreenArt.Birdsong.org

              > ________________________________________________________________________
              > 1e. Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?
              > Posted by: "Jody Gore" jody_gore@... jody_gore
              > Date: Sat Jun 25, 2011 3:20 pm ((PDT))
              >
              > Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She
              > has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have
              > tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For
              > some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle,
              > regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride
              > and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are
              PLENTY
              > at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They have a
              > concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear adults
              make
              > this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my (son,
              daughter,
              > grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I always tell
              them and
              > you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a car until you were
              taught.
              > Drawing is a talent that is taught not something you are born with
              > (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that surrounds the concept
              of art...
              > like it is this supernatural thing that 'happens' to people at
              > birth. Anyway...
              >
              >
              > Jody Gore
              > DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
              > 318-858-2444
              > Secretary
            • Jody Gore
              Message 6 of 28 , Jun 26, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                <<I don't even cut parents any slack now. When someone visits -
                usually with one of my students in tow - and says something like
                "I've never been able to draw - they gave up on me when I was six" I
                respond with, "It's never too late. Art is a skill just like
                reading, writing, and arithmetic. Join us in our studios for a
                session or two and we (your child and I) will show you!" Everything
                is more fun after a little practice.>>
                 
                I do the same thing! For a couple of reasons...first, I want the parent to see their child in a different light. The skills they are learning are not just, "something to do" but an important part of education...and like other curriculum, not always easy. Second, the parents are the catalyst for change in school curriculum. To educate the adults on the power of art lessons as an important cross-curriculum tool gives art a more concrete place in education. All my Art Club curriculum involves parental supervision...kinda killing two birds with one stone. What the child learns so does the parent. But one of the rules is they cannot 'take over' their childs art study for the session. They are taught how to talk their child through the process. It has amazing results in terms of a true adult appreciation for the work their child attempts.

                 
                Jody Gore
                DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                318-858-2444
                Secretary 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 

                From: Joyce Rainwalker <joycerainwalker@...>
                To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2011 10:54 AM
                Subject: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

                 
                While I don't use Brookes' book, I think you've hit on a crucial
                point, Jody. I don't use the term, "talent" in my work with artists
                any more. I've replaced it with "skill" and emphasize it much like
                you do. We talk about how targeted practice makes a difference in
                soccer, baseball, and guitar lessons. I've found it's even more
                important to draw a parallel to other curriculum areas, too. How
                many attempts did it take until you were at ease with arithmetic
                algorithms? -With the rules of grammar or writing a paragraph? -With
                spelling the days of the week? If we treated mathematics like we do
                art and said things like, "Well, he just doesn't have the math
                talent in his family, but you should see how his sister can count!"
                we'd notice the incongruity, but you're right - there has always
                been a mystique about art. That's not to say there is genius in some
                artists (speaking of drawing *and* differential equations) but we
                can have a reasonable expectation of success with hard work and
                steady, patient practice.

                I don't even cut parents any slack now. When someone visits -
                usually with one of my students in tow - and says something like
                "I've never been able to draw - they gave up on me when I was six" I
                respond with, "It's never too late. Art is a skill just like
                reading, writing, and arithmetic. Join us in our studios for a
                session or two and we (your child and I) will show you!" Everything
                is more fun after a little practice.

                Because I'm a constructivist who uses Teaching for Artistic Behavior
                (TAB) pedagogy in our studio, I focus on sharing lots of different
                techniques and skills with my students rather than using specific
                projects. Even then, when I sit in one of our mini-studios and do
                art of my own (rare, both because there's so little time to sit and
                I avoid providing a single model for kids), some little one will
                give me a, "Wow - that's good. You're an artist!" My stock response
                is always, "Thank you. We're all artists and I've practiced for
                years. Wait until you see what you can do when you're 103 like me!"

                Like you, I want children to realize that the magic of artistry is
                made up of equal parts of persistence, attention, and practice.

                Joyce
                ...........
                K-5 Art Specialist
                http://EvergreenArt.Birdsong.org

                > __________________________________________________________
                > 1e. Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?
                > Posted by: "Jody Gore" jody_gore@... jody_gore
                > Date: Sat Jun 25, 2011 3:20 pm ((PDT))
                >
                > Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She
                > has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have
                > tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For
                > some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle,
                > regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride
                > and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are
                PLENTY
                > at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They have a
                > concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear adults
                make
                > this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my (son,
                daughter,
                > grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I always tell
                them and
                > you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a car until you were
                taught.
                > Drawing is a talent that is taught not something you are born with
                > (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that surrounds the concept
                of art...
                > like it is this supernatural thing that 'happens' to people at
                > birth. Anyway...
                >
                >
                > Jody Gore
                > DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                > 318-858-2444
                > Secretary



              • Susun Gallery
                Actually it s Mona Brookes, and it is the same theory, I draw, you draw ...copy what you see...shapes connected to shapes. My co-teacher, Michelle Stitz, was
                Message 7 of 28 , Jun 27, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Actually it's Mona Brookes, and it is the same theory, "I draw, you draw"...copy what you see...shapes connected to shapes.  My co-teacher, Michelle Stitz, was one of her students, her drawings as a child, are in the book.  Children, and adults, can learn to draw.  But I disagree, there are many that are born with vision, and draw effortlessly.  

                  I had the privilege of spending three days with Francis Crick while he was alive, who wrote his last book, "How the Brain Sees".  Science dictates that some brains see better than others.  Unfortunately, some of these brains suffer from various mental illnesses, as in the case of Van Gogh. 

                  It may be supernatural, or something we don't quite understand yet, but it is very true and something to empathize.  I see it in my students everyday...and very misunderstood.

                  Susun Gallery
                   
                  On Jun 25, 2011, at 3:15 PM, Jody Gore wrote:

                   

                  Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle, regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
                   
                  Jody Gore
                  DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                  318-858-2444
                  Secretary 
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   

                  From: Susun Gallery <susungallery@...>
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

                   
                  Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.

                  The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll love they're results.

                  Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.

                  There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
                  The best to you in Art.
                  Susun Gallery


                  On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:

                   
                  :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.

                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
                  >
                  > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                  >
                  > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                  >
                  > Lauren
                  >
                  > Lauren R. Perlman
                  > Founder/Director
                  > Mummies and Masterpieces
                  > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                  >
                  >
                  > Sent from my iPhone
                  >
                  > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
                  > Good luck, Robin
                  >






                • Lenny Sanz
                  I did my master s thesis on the observation that special ed kids have a better drawing ability then regular ed kids. I did alot of observations and I felt
                  Message 8 of 28 , Jun 28, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I did my master's thesis on the observation that special ed kids
                    have a better drawing ability then regular ed kids. I did alot of
                    observations
                    and I felt that it was proven true. This may click with what Crick was
                    saying.

                    Donna


                    On Jun 27, 2011, at 10:36 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:

                    > Actually it's Mona Brookes, and it is the same theory, "I draw, you
                    > draw"...copy what you see...shapes connected to shapes.  My
                    > co-teacher, Michelle Stitz, was one of her students, her drawings as a
                    > child, are in the book.  Children, and adults, can learn to draw.  But
                    > I disagree, there are many that are born with vision, and draw
                    > effortlessly.  
                    >
                    > I had the privilege of spending three days with Francis Crick while he
                    > was alive, who wrote his last book, "How the Brain Sees".  Science
                    > dictates that some brains see better than others.  Unfortunately, some
                    > of these brains suffer from various mental illnesses, as in the case
                    > of Van Gogh. 
                    >
                    > It may be supernatural, or something we don't quite understand yet,
                    > but it is very true and something to empathize.  I see it in my
                    > students everyday...and very misunderstood.
                    >
                    > Susun Gallery
                    >  
                    > On Jun 25, 2011, at 3:15 PM, Jody Gore wrote:
                    >
                    >>  
                    >>
                    >> Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She
                    >> has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have
                    >> tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For
                    >> some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle,
                    >> regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride
                    >> and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are
                    >> PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They
                    >> have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear
                    >> adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my
                    >> (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I
                    >> always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a
                    >> car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not
                    >> something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that
                    >> surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing
                    >> that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
                    >>  
                    >> Jody Gore
                    >> DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                    >> 318-858-2444
                    >> Secretary 
                    >>  
                    >>  
                    >>  
                    >>  
                    >>  
                    >>  
                    >>
                    >> From: Susun Gallery <susungallery@...>
                    >> To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                    >> Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
                    >> Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for
                    >> Teaching Kids How to Draw?
                    >>
                    >>  
                    >> Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in
                    >> Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side
                    >> of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.
                    >>  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their
                    >> heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree
                    >> upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so
                    >> that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book
                    >> was published.
                    >>
                    >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If
                    >> you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and
                    >> with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream
                    >> of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes
                    >> connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll
                    >> love they're results.
                    >>
                    >> Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it
                    >> up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we
                    >> try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to
                    >> understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...
                    >>  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action
                    >> poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of
                    >> butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group
                    >> project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each
                    >> others art at the same time.
                    >>
                    >> There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing
                    >> videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best
                    >> for you.
                    >> The best to you in Art.
                    >> Susun Gallery
                    >> susungallery.com
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:
                    >>
                    >>>  
                    >>> :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly
                    >>> teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.
                    >>>
                    >>> --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...>
                    >>> wrote:
                    >>> >
                    >>> > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that
                    >>> has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I
                    >>> personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as
                    >>> possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so
                    >>> that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is
                    >>> to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling
                    >>> the children to feel as much success as possible.
                    >>> >
                    >>> > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                    >>> >
                    >>> > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                    >>> >
                    >>> > Lauren
                    >>> >
                    >>> > Lauren R. Perlman
                    >>> > Founder/Director
                    >>> > Mummies and Masterpieces
                    >>> > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                    >>> >
                    >>> >
                    >>> > Sent from my iPhone
                    >>> >
                    >>> > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
                    >>> >
                    >>> > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have
                    >>> received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as
                    >>> it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant
                    >>> emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them.
                    >>> Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on
                    >>> our emils during the day?
                    >>> > Good luck, Robin
                    >>> >
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                  • Jody Gore
                    hmmmm...Montessori thought all children could be taught with minimal adult interferance. Even then examples are given and steps are arranged for a successful
                    Message 9 of 28 , Jun 28, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      hmmmm...Montessori thought all children could be taught with minimal adult interferance. Even then examples are given and steps are arranged for a successful outcome. I often use a loose Montessori approach in my art classes. Not all the classes, but this week we will make Picasso collages. I will have three pics and read a story on the Girl With the Pony Tail. I will show them how I create(d) my Picasso.Then different stations will allow the children to create their picassos as they see fit.
                       
                      Jody Gore
                      DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                      318-858-2444
                      Secretary 
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       

                      From: Lenny Sanz <elfbab@...>
                      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2011 10:56 AM
                      Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

                      I did my master's thesis on the observation that special ed kids
                      have a better drawing ability then regular ed kids.  I did alot of observations
                      and I felt that it was proven true.  This may click with what Crick was saying.

                      Donna


                      On Jun 27, 2011, at 10:36 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:

                      > Actually it's Mona Brookes, and it is the same theory, "I draw, you draw"...copy what you see...shapes connected to shapes.  My co-teacher, Michelle Stitz, was one of her students, her drawings as a child, are in the book.  Children, and adults, can learn to draw.  But I disagree, there are many that are born with vision, and draw effortlessly.  
                      >
                      > I had the privilege of spending three days with Francis Crick while he was alive, who wrote his last book, "How the Brain Sees".  Science dictates that some brains see better than others.  Unfortunately, some of these brains suffer from various mental illnesses, as in the case of Van Gogh. 
                      >
                      > It may be supernatural, or something we don't quite understand yet, but it is very true and something to empathize.  I see it in my students everyday...and very misunderstood.
                      >
                      > Susun Gallery
                      >  
                      > On Jun 25, 2011, at 3:15 PM, Jody Gore wrote:
                      >
                      >>  
                      >>
                      >> Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle, regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
                      >>  
                      >> Jody Gore
                      >> DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                      >> 318-858-2444
                      >> Secretary 
                      >>  
                      >>  
                      >>  
                      >>  
                      >>  
                      >>  
                      >>
                      >> From: Susun Gallery <susungallery@...>
                      >> To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                      >> Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
                      >> Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?
                      >>
                      >>  
                      >> Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.
                      >>
                      >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll love they're results.
                      >>
                      >> Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.
                      >>
                      >> There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
                      >> The best to you in Art.
                      >> Susun Gallery
                      >> susungallery.com
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:
                      >>
                      >>>  
                      >>> :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.
                      >>>
                      >>>  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...> wrote:
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > Lauren
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > Lauren R. Perlman
                      >>>  > Founder/Director
                      >>>  > Mummies and Masterpieces
                      >>>  > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > Sent from my iPhone
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
                      >>>  >
                      >>>  > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
                      >>>  > Good luck, Robin
                      >>>  >
                      >>>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >


                    • Susun Gallery
                      That s interesting, I ve seen similar results in kids with mild mental illnesses of various sort too. It s a calming world for them where all the pieces fit.
                      Message 10 of 28 , Jun 28, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        That's interesting, I've seen similar results in kids with mild mental illnesses of various sort too.  It's a calming world for them where all the pieces fit.  Some feel the same about music.
                        Head, Heart & Hand...Art's 3-H club.  The actual title of Crick's book ended up being, "The Astonishing Hypothesis", not for people of faith.

                        Susun

                        On Jun 28, 2011, at 8:56 AM, Lenny Sanz wrote:

                        I did my master's thesis on the observation that special ed kids
                        have a better drawing ability then regular ed kids.  I did alot of observations
                        and I felt that it was proven true.  This may click with what Crick was saying.

                        Donna


                        On Jun 27, 2011, at 10:36 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:

                        Actually it's Mona Brookes, and it is the same theory, "I draw, you draw"...copy what you see...shapes connected to shapes.  My co-teacher, Michelle Stitz, was one of her students, her drawings as a child, are in the book.  Children, and adults, can learn to draw.  But I disagree, there are many that are born with vision, and draw effortlessly.  

                        I had the privilege of spending three days with Francis Crick while he was alive, who wrote his last book, "How the Brain Sees".  Science dictates that some brains see better than others.  Unfortunately, some of these brains suffer from various mental illnesses, as in the case of Van Gogh. 

                        It may be supernatural, or something we don't quite understand yet, but it is very true and something to empathize.  I see it in my students everyday...and very misunderstood.

                        Susun Gallery
                         
                        On Jun 25, 2011, at 3:15 PM, Jody Gore wrote:

                         

                        Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle, regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
                         
                        Jody Gore
                        DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                        318-858-2444
                        Secretary 
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         

                        From: Susun Gallery <susungallery@...>
                        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
                        Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for Teaching Kids How to Draw?

                         
                        Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.

                        The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll love they're results.

                        Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.

                        There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
                        The best to you in Art.
                        Susun Gallery
                        susungallery.com


                        On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:

                         
                        :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.

                        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
                        >
                        > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                        >
                        > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                        >
                        > Lauren
                        >
                        > Lauren R. Perlman
                        > Founder/Director
                        > Mummies and Masterpieces
                        > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                        >
                        >
                        > Sent from my iPhone
                        >
                        > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
                        > Good luck, Robin
                        >








                      • BrendaR
                        Susung: Hey I really enjoyed your website. Do you have any of the demos mentioned on there up and running? Brenda
                        Message 11 of 28 , Jun 29, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Susung:
                          Hey I really enjoyed your website. Do you have any of the demos mentioned on there up and running?
                          Brenda


                          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery <susungallery@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning. I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids. The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated. Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that. Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt. Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.
                          >
                          > The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between. They'll love they're results.
                          >
                          > Another successful approach is "life drawing". Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling. First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting. Then they have a go at it... 2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props. If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party. Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.
                          >
                          > There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
                          > The best to you in Art.
                          > Susun Gallery
                          > susungallery.com
                          >
                          >
                          > On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:
                          >
                          > > :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.
                          > >
                          > > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
                          > > >
                          > > > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                          > > >
                          > > > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                          > > >
                          > > > Lauren
                          > > >
                          > > > Lauren R. Perlman
                          > > > Founder/Director
                          > > > Mummies and Masterpieces
                          > > > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Sent from my iPhone
                          > > >
                          > > > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
                          > > > Good luck, Robin
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Susun Gallery
                          Thanks so much. Not yet, but we re having a little fun with that this summer and probably will publish them in September. The site keeps changing though,
                          Message 12 of 28 , Jun 29, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Thanks so much.  Not yet, but we're having a little fun with that this summer and probably will publish them in September.  The site keeps changing though, keep in touch!
                            Susun

                            On Jun 29, 2011, at 5:58 AM, BrendaR wrote:

                             

                            Susung:
                            Hey I really enjoyed your website. Do you have any of the demos mentioned on there up and running?
                            Brenda

                            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery <susungallery@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning. I operate an Artschool in Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids. The Right Side of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated. Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their heads around that. Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so that can't hurt. Neuroscience has come a long way since that book was published.
                            >
                            > The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between. They'll love they're results.
                            >
                            > Another successful approach is "life drawing". Kids love to ham it up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling. First, we try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to understand the shapes we're connecting. Then they have a go at it... 2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action poses and props. If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of butcher paper, it looks like a dance party. Then it becomes a group project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each others art at the same time.
                            >
                            > There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best for you.
                            > The best to you in Art.
                            > Susun Gallery
                            > susungallery.com
                            >
                            >
                            > On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:
                            >
                            > > :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.
                            > >
                            > > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren <laurenrperlman@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling the children to feel as much success as possible.
                            > > >
                            > > > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                            > > >
                            > > > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                            > > >
                            > > > Lauren
                            > > >
                            > > > Lauren R. Perlman
                            > > > Founder/Director
                            > > > Mummies and Masterpieces
                            > > > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > Sent from my iPhone
                            > > >
                            > > > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell <breeleo@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them. Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on our emils during the day?
                            > > > Good luck, Robin
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >


                          • LINDA WOODS
                            I disagree that Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain will ever be dated. I don t do all the exercises one after the other. I have read it and understand
                            Message 13 of 28 , Jun 29, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I disagree that Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain will ever be dated.  I don't do all the exercises one after the other.  I have read it and understand it, and I have compiled a list of things that I tell my students to guide them while they are drawing on their own from observation.  It's about discovery!  I have them write down key words "to get you out of a drawing pickle" that I have them put at the top of their page, or I put it on the table as a list.  All of these concepts are what I took from reading DOTRSOTB (drawing on the rt. side).  It was eye opening for me, and it really does break drawing down into a process that is explainable and that can help kids to SEE in such a way that they can then draw what they see. 

                              Here is my list:
                              Steel bar:  Imagine a steel bar that connect your eye seeing with your hand drawing.  If your eye following a contour goes up, your hand goes up, if your eye sees a zigzag, your hand draws that zigzag, same speed, same time.
                              Clock Face:  A lot of time when you are drawing from observation things just flow.  But sometimes you find yourself "in a pickle' over an angle or change of direction.  Clock face is a way to help yourself see direction changes in relation to the time on a clock.  For example.  if you are drawing and all of a sudden have trouble figuring out which way you should take your line in a new direction, imagine that the place where the direction changes on the object is like the center of the clock.  Now imagine the direction you need to draw next as heading towards one of the hours of time on the clock face.  For example, straight up is 12:00,  horizontal to the left is towards 9:00. 
                              and so on.  And you can break it down further...you might draw towards 5:30, for example. 
                              Angle Transfer:  If you are looking at something in front of you, like  a still life, you can close one eye (so you don't see double) and lay your pencil down along the angle of something you want to draw....like the spout of a teapot.  If you are directly facing what you are drawing with your paper in front of you, you can just drop your hand down to the paper without twisting your wrist at ALL, and the angle you see your pencil laying at on your paper will match the angle of the spout you are trying to draw.   This also works great for transfering rooflines, or when you are drawing a room in perspective and want to draw the ceiling at the right angles on your paper.  Just line up the pencil over the line you want to transfer from the ceiling, and then drop it straight down without twisting to your page.  Study the pencil and where it is laying for a minute in order to try to memorize where you will draw your line, then pick up your pencil and draw the line. 
                              N, S, E, W:  (my symbol for this is two perpendicular lines with arrows at the end of each line). 
                              What is directly above, below, or to the side of something you have already drawn.  For example, if you are drawing a horse's head, what part of the horse's body is directly below the eye, above the eye, to the right of the eye.  This will help you figure out how to keep things lined up and sized appropriately when you are drawing from observation.  What part of the horse's body lines up directly above, or beside the jaw, etc. 
                              Ratio/Proportion:    Depending on what you draw first, you can figure out and estimate how big the rest of your drawing should be based upon using the first thing you draw as a measuring stick to figure out proportion.  For example:  If you draw an eye first, how many eyes wide is the face?  How many eyes long is the nose?  (an eye and a half, maybe).  If you draw a door first on a house, you can then measure how many doors tall your house should be by looking at the house you are actually drawing to figure out those measurements.  Close one eye so you don't have double vision when you look at the house.  Measure the height of the door with your fingers or a pencil.  Then figure out how many doors tall or wide your house should be.  You can measure proportion for anything you draw based upon what you draw first....use that as the measuring stick to help you figure it all out.
                              Dry Tracing for feeling:  Einstein said, "the best way to study something is to draw it." 
                              Let's say you are looking at a bird that you want to draw, this bird is a photo you took, or a copyright illustration that you can use to understand anatomy and detail of that bird in order to make an original drawing.  (Discuss copyright issues....just because a photo is on the internet does not mean you can COPY IT.)  Sharpen your pencil.  You are going to SLOWLY go over the lines in this bird to try to understand it better before you draw it.  You are not going to actually touch the paper with your pencil, you are just going to hover right above a line and follow it to get the feeling of actually drawing that line, and also you are going to be looking slowly for detail that you miss when you look at something too quickly.  For example, look for parallel lines around eyes....an eye is much more than a circle or a football shape.  There is dimension to eyelids...two lines to form the edge of an eyelid.  There are lines that add to the detail around the eye.  Study the true shape of that beak.  Be sure to think about where it is fattest, thinnest, what the difference is between the upper and lower part of the beak.  Dry tracing is a great way to understand what a bird's foot or claw looks like.  Do this before you draw anything, and take your time.  Pretend you are a detective, or that you are describing the animal for a blind person in such a way that they might actually be able to draw it just by feeling, by following your instructions. 

                              Draw overlapping things first:  Draw the things that have their bases closest to the bottom of the page first.  If these objects overlap other things, look at where the lines of the overlapped objects intersect the objects you drew first.  For example, if you draw a box in front of a cup, look at where the cup touches the box.  Then go to your drawing and begin drawing the cup at the place on the box where you see it intersecting.    Keep comparing what you draw to other things you have already drawn...do they look bigger, smaller, where do the objects touch each other in your drawing? 

                              There might be a few more, but these are the ones I am remembering right now.  After explaining these concepts to my kids, I can just say, "angle transfer might help you to figure out how to draw that."  or "try using "clock face" to help you figure out that direction change."  or "What is directly under that ear?  What needs to line up with it?  What does the foot line up with?"  and so on.  For a BIG drawing project, I have them actually WRITE the concept words at the top of their page.  I find that this makes them more user friendly and serves as a better reminder than just laying a page with this list on their table.  They do it lightly in pencil and can erase them later. 

                              Hope this helps.  I can't imagine teaching drawing any other way!  I begin these concepts with my 2nd graders.  In 3rd grade, kids use viewfinders (slide jackets!) to help them figure out the proportions of a set up still life.  They select their view through the viewfinder that they actually want to draw.  There are marks in the middle of each side of the viewfinder.  We mark the drawing paper (same ratio as the viewfinder) with marks on the middle of each side to correspond to the viewfinder.  So, if the violin in the still life takes up half the height in the viewfinder , it takes up half the height of their drawing paper.  If the neck of the violin runs at an angle from 8:00 to 2:00 on the clock face, they will draw the neck of the violin at an angle from 8:00 to 2:00 on their page.
                              I LOVE to teach drawing to children.  They CAN understand it, and see that you don't have to be born gifted to learn to draw.  I tell them that drawing is a lot of tricks and gimmicks and smoke and mirrors.  If they can LISTEN and try to understand the drawing tricks I am teaching them, they can break down what they are trying to draw into many ways to understand what they are seeing.  
                              Linda Woods





                              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lenny Sanz <elfbab@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I did my master's thesis on the observation that special ed kids
                              > have a better drawing ability then regular ed kids. I did alot of
                              > observations
                              > and I felt that it was proven true. This may click with what Crick was
                              > saying.
                              >
                              > Donna
                              >
                              >
                              > On Jun 27, 2011, at 10:36 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:
                              >
                              > > Actually it's Mona Brookes, and it is the same theory, "I draw, you
                              > > draw"...copy what you see...shapes connected to shapes.  My
                              > > co-teacher, Michelle Stitz, was one of her students, her drawings as a
                              > > child, are in the book.  Children, and adults, can learn to draw.  But
                              > > I disagree, there are many that are born with vision, and draw
                              > > effortlessly.  
                              > >
                              > > I had the privilege of spending three days with Francis Crick while he
                              > > was alive, who wrote his last book, "How the Brain Sees".  Science
                              > > dictates that some brains see better than others.  Unfortunately, some
                              > > of these brains suffer from various mental illnesses, as in the case
                              > > of Van Gogh. 
                              > >
                              > > It may be supernatural, or something we don't quite understand yet,
                              > > but it is very true and something to empathize.  I see it in my
                              > > students everyday...and very misunderstood.
                              > >
                              > > Susun Gallery
                              > >  
                              > > On Jun 25, 2011, at 3:15 PM, Jody Gore wrote:
                              > >
                              > >>  
                              > >>
                              > >> Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She
                              > >> has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have
                              > >> tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For
                              > >> some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle,
                              > >> regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride
                              > >> and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are
                              > >> PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They
                              > >> have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear
                              > >> adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my
                              > >> (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I
                              > >> always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a
                              > >> car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not
                              > >> something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that
                              > >> surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing
                              > >> that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
                              > >>  
                              > >> Jody Gore
                              > >> DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                              > >> 318-858-2444
                              > >> Secretary 
                              > >>  
                              > >>  
                              > >>  
                              > >>  
                              > >>  
                              > >>  
                              > >>
                              > >> From: Susun Gallery susungallery@...
                              > >> To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                              > >> Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
                              > >> Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for
                              > >> Teaching Kids How to Draw?
                              > >>
                              > >>  
                              > >> Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in
                              > >> Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side
                              > >> of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.
                              > >>  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their
                              > >> heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree
                              > >> upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so
                              > >> that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book
                              > >> was published.
                              > >>
                              > >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If
                              > >> you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and
                              > >> with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream
                              > >> of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes
                              > >> connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll
                              > >> love they're results.
                              > >>
                              > >> Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it
                              > >> up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we
                              > >> try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to
                              > >> understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...
                              > >>  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action
                              > >> poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of
                              > >> butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group
                              > >> project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each
                              > >> others art at the same time.
                              > >>
                              > >> There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing
                              > >> videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best
                              > >> for you.
                              > >> The best to you in Art.
                              > >> Susun Gallery
                              > >> susungallery.com
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:
                              > >>
                              > >>>  
                              > >>> :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly
                              > >>> teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.
                              > >>>
                              > >>> --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren laurenrperlman@
                              > >>> wrote:
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that
                              > >>> has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I
                              > >>> personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as
                              > >>> possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so
                              > >>> that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is
                              > >>> to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling
                              > >>> the children to feel as much success as possible.
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > Lauren
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > Lauren R. Perlman
                              > >>> > Founder/Director
                              > >>> > Mummies and Masterpieces
                              > >>> > mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > Sent from my iPhone
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell breeleo@ wrote:
                              > >>> >
                              > >>> > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have
                              > >>> received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as
                              > >>> it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant
                              > >>> emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them.
                              > >>> Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on
                              > >>> our emils during the day?
                              > >>> > Good luck, Robin
                              > >>> >
                              > >>>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • Susun Gallery
                              Hi Linda, That all works, and you have some terrific ideas for getting excellent drawing results. Thank you for sharing. The book is still a useful model, but
                              Message 14 of 28 , Jun 29, 2011
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                                Hi Linda,

                                That all works, and you have some terrific ideas for getting excellent drawing results.  Thank you for sharing.   
                                The book is still a useful model, but neuroscience has moved on from this hemispherical notion.  Theory being that the left side is logical, and the right irrational.  The primary visual cortex is actually to the very back side of the brain.  Most neurons that fire throughout the brain, are connected to the core, or the thalamus...the part responsible for shyness. 

                                The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, should have included a much more three, or even four dimensional view of the brain.  It's like saying there is a right and a left side to the universe, or that the world is upside down, when it's simply polarized.  I felt like the book was just a marketing attempt to remake the first one that came out in 1979.  

                                It's all good, you sound like a wonderful art teacher,
                                Susun 



                                 
                                On Jun 29, 2011, at 9:51 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:

                                 

                                I disagree that Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain will ever be dated.  I don't do all the exercises one after the other.  I have read it and understand it, and I have compiled a list of things that I tell my students to guide them while they are drawing on their own from observation.  It's about discovery!  I have them write down key words "to get you out of a drawing pickle" that I have them put at the top of their page, or I put it on the table as a list.  All of these concepts are what I took from reading DOTRSOTB (drawing on the rt. side).  It was eye opening for me, and it really does break drawing down into a process that is explainable and that can help kids to SEE in such a way that they can then draw what they see. 

                                Here is my list:
                                Steel bar:  Imagine a steel bar that connect your eye seeing with your hand drawing.  If your eye following a contour goes up, your hand goes up, if your eye sees a zigzag, your hand draws that zigzag, same speed, same time.
                                Clock Face:  A lot of time when you are drawing from observation things just flow.  But sometimes you find yourself "in a pickle' over an angle or change of direction.  Clock face is a way to help yourself see direction changes in relation to the time on a clock.  For example.  if you are drawing and all of a sudden have trouble figuring out which way you should take your line in a new direction, imagine that the place where the direction changes on the object is like the center of the clock.  Now imagine the direction you need to draw next as heading towards one of the hours of time on the clock face.  For example, straight up is 12:00,  horizontal to the left is towards 9:00. 
                                and so on.  And you can break it down further...you might draw towards 5:30, for example. 
                                Angle Transfer:  If you are looking at something in front of you! , like  a still life, you can close one eye (so you don't see double) and lay your pencil down along the angle of something you want to draw....like the spout of a teapot.  If you are directly facing what you are drawing with your paper in front of you, you can just drop your hand down to the paper without twisting your wrist at ALL, and the angle you see your pencil laying at on your paper will match the angle of the spout you are trying to draw.   This also works great for transfering rooflines, or when you are drawing a room in perspective and want to draw the ceiling at the right angles on your paper.  Just line up the pencil over the line you want to transfer from the ceiling, and then drop it straight down without twisting to your page.  Study the pencil and where it is laying for a minute in order to try to memorize where you will draw your line, then pick up your pencil and draw the line. 
                                N, S, E, W:  (my symbol for this is two perpendicular lines with arrows at the end of each line). 
                                What is directly above, below, or to the side of something you have already drawn.  For example, if you are drawing a horse's head, what part of the horse's body is directly below the eye, above the eye, to the right of the eye.  This will help you figure out how to keep things lined up and sized appropriately when you are drawing from observation.  What part of the horse's body lines up directly above, or beside the jaw, etc. 
                                Ratio/Proportion:    Depending on what you draw first, you can figure out and estimate how big the rest of your drawing should be based upon using the first thing you draw as a measuring stick to figure out proportion.  For example:  If you draw an eye first, how many eyes wide is the face?  How many eyes long is the nose?  (an eye and a half, maybe).  If you draw a door first on a house, you can t! hen measure how many doors tall your house should be by looking at the house you are actually drawing to figure out those measurements.  Close one eye so you don't have double vision when you look at the house.  Measure the height of the door with your fingers or a pencil.  Then figure out how many doors tall or wide your house should be.  You can measure proportion for anything you draw based upon what you draw first....use that as the measuring stick to help you figure it all out.
                                Dry Tracing for feeling:  Einstein said, "the best way to study something is to draw it." 
                                Let's say you are looking at a bird that you want to draw, this bird is a photo you took, or a copyright illustration that you can use to understand anatomy and detail of that bird in order to make an original drawing.  (Discuss copyright issues....just because a photo is on the internet does not mean you can COPY IT.)  Sharpen your pencil.  You are going to SLOWLY go over the lines in this bird to try to understand it better before you draw it.  You are not going to actually touch the paper with your pencil, you are just going to hover right above a line and follow it to get the feeling of actually drawing that line, and also you are going to be looking slowly for detail that you miss when you look at something too quickly.  For example, look for parallel lines around eyes....an eye is much more than a circle or a football shape.  There is dimension to eyelids...two lines to form the edge of an eyelid.  There are lines that add to the detail around the eye.  Study the true shape of that beak.  Be sure to think about where it is fattest, thinnest, what the difference is between the upper and lower part of the beak.  Dry tracing is a great way to understand what a bird's foot or claw looks like.  Do this before you draw anything, and take your time.  Pretend you are a detective, or that you are describing the animal for ! a blind person in such a way that they might actually be able to draw it just by feeling, by following your instructions. 

                                Draw overlapping things first:  Draw the things that have their bases closest to the bottom of the page first.  If these objects overlap other things, look at where the lines of the overlapped objects intersect the objects you drew first.  For example, if you draw a box in front of a cup, look at where the cup touches the box.  Then go to your drawing and begin drawing the cup at the place on the box where you see it intersecting.    Keep comparing what you draw to other things you have already drawn...do they look bigger, smaller, where do the objects touch each other in your drawing? 

                                There might be a few more, but these are the ones I am remembering right now.  After explaining these concepts to my kids, I can just say, "angle transfer might help you to figure out how to draw that."  or "try using "clock face" to help you figure out that direction change."  or "What is directly under that ear?  What needs to line up with it?  What does the foot line up with?"  and so on.  For a BIG drawing project, I have them actually WRITE the concept words at the top of their page.  I find that this makes them more user friendly and serves as a better reminder than just laying a page with this list on their table.  They do it lightly in pencil and can erase them later. 

                                Hope this helps.  I can't imagine teaching drawing any other way!  I begin these concepts with my 2nd graders.  In 3rd grade, kids use viewfinders (slide jackets!) to help them figure out the proportions of a set up still life.  They select their view through the viewfinder that they actually want to draw.  There are marks in the middle of each side of the viewfinder.  We mark the drawing paper (same ratio as the viewfinder) with marks on the middle of each side! to correspond to the viewfinder.  So, if the violin in the still life takes up half the height in the viewfinder , it takes up half the height of their drawing paper.  If the neck of the violin runs at an angle from 8:00 to 2:00 on the clock face, they will draw the neck of the violin at an angle from 8:00 to 2:00 on their page.
                                I LOVE to teach drawing to children.  They CAN understand it, and see that you don't have to be born gifted to learn to draw.  I tell them that drawing is a lot of tricks and gimmicks and smoke and mirrors.  If they can LISTEN and try to understand the drawing tricks I am teaching them, they can break down what they are trying to draw into many ways to understand what they are seeing.  
                                Linda Woods





                                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lenny Sanz <elfbab@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I did my master's thesis on the observation that special ed kids
                                > have a better drawing ability then regular ed kids. I did alot of
                                > observations
                                > and I felt that it was proven true. This may click with what Crick was
                                > saying.
                                >
                                > Donna
                                >
                                >
                                > On Jun 27, 2011, at 10:36 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:
                                >
                                > > Actually it's Mona Brookes, and it is the same theory, "I draw, you
                                > > draw"...copy what you see...shapes connected to shapes.  My
                                > > co-teacher, Michelle Stitz, was one of her students, her drawings as a
                                > > child, are in the book.  Children, and adults, can learn to draw.  But
                                > > I disagree, there are many that are born with vision, and draw
                                > > effortlessly.  
                                > >
                                > > I had the privilege of spending three days with Francis Crick while he
                                > > was alive, who wrote his last book, "How the Brain Sees".  Science
                                > > dictates that some brains see better than others.  Unfortunately, some
                                > > of these brains suffer from various mental illnesses, ! as in the case
                                > > of Van Gogh. 
                                > >
                                > > It may be supernatural, or something we don't quite understand yet,
                                > > but it is very true and something to empathize.  I see it in my
                                > > students everyday...and very misunderstood.
                                > >
                                > > Susun Gallery
                                > >  
                                > > On Jun 25, 2011, at 3:15 PM, Jody Gore wrote:
                                > >
                                > >>  
                                > >>
                                > >> Monica Brookes' book, Drawing with Children...I love this book. She
                                > >> has a very common sense approach to teaching kids to draw. I have
                                > >> tried her techniques and the results are wonderful...usually. For
                                > >> some kids (as with adults) learning to draw is a real struggle,
                                > >> regardless. (Like I have to tell you this) Others take it in stride
                                > >> and work through the feelings surrounding drawing and there are
                                > >> PLENTY at every level of age. Adults are the hardest to teach. They
                                > >> have a concrete mindset...let's take a poll. How many of you hear
                                > >> adults make this statement, " I can't draw a stick person, but my
                                > >> (son, daughter, grandchild, neighbor) has a talent for drawing." I
                                > >> always tell them and you didn't know how to ride a bike or drive a
                                > >> car until you were taught. Drawing is a talent that is taught not
                                > >> something you are born with (usually). I go nuts with the mystic that
                                > >> surrounds the concept of art...like it is this supernatural thing
                                > >> that 'happens' to people at birth. Anyway...
                                > >>  
                                > >> Jody Gore
                                > >> DeSoto Arts Council Art Gallery, Manager
                                > >> 318-858-2444
                                > >> Secretary 
                                > >>  
                                > >>  
                                > >>  
                                > >>  
                                > >>  
                                > >>  
                                > >&g! t;
                                > >> From: Susun Gallery susungallery@...
                                > >> To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                                > >> Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:43 AM
                                > >> Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: What is Your Favorite Resource for
                                > >> Teaching Kids How to Draw?
                                > >>
                                > >>  
                                > >> Two things...Life Drawing and Cartooning.  I operate an Artschool in
                                > >> Santa Cruz, our enrollment is near 200, mostly kids.  The Right Side
                                > >> of the Brain book, may be one of the few out there, but it is dated.
                                > >>  Children's brains aren't even developed enough yet to wrap their
                                > >> heads around that.  Although the games are fun, like drawing a tree
                                > >> upside down, that's all they are is games, and kids like games, so
                                > >> that can't hurt.  Neuroscience has come a long way since that book
                                > >> was published.
                                > >>
                                > >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".  If
                                > >> you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and
                                > >> with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream
                                > >> of copy paper, and a sense of humor.   Not too fast, just shapes
                                > >> connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between.  They'll
                                > >> love they're results.
                                > >>
                                > >> Another successful approach is "life drawing".  Kids love to ham it
                                > >> up with each other, so I have them take turns modeling.  First, we
                                > >> try it with the small wooden manikins (under $5 ea. at IKEA) to
                                > >> understand the shapes we're connecting.  Then they have a go at it...
                                > >>  2-3 minutes sets, and we take turns drawing each other with action
                                > >> poses and props.  If we draw everyone in the room on a 12' piece of !
                                > >> butcher paper, it looks like a dance party.  Then it becomes a group
                                > >> project, always more fun, and they're engaged at exploring each
                                > >> others art at the same time.
                                > >>
                                > >> There's some fun ideas on Youtube, check out the speed drawing
                                > >> videos, but most of all, remember your childhood and what worked best
                                > >> for you.
                                > >> The best to you in Art.
                                > >> Susun Gallery
                                > >> susungallery.com
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> On Jun 25, 2011, at 5:25 AM, LINDA WOODS wrote:
                                > >>
                                > >>>  
                                > >>> :Drawing on The Right Side Of The Brain" hands down! It truly
                                > >>> teaches you how to look and transfer what you see to drawing.
                                > >>>
                                > >>> --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Lauren laurenrperlman@
                                > >>> wrote:
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > Hi, everyone. Do you have a favorite book, blog, or website that
                                > >>> has good suggestions regarding drawing with 7-10-year-olds? I
                                > >>> personally like teaching in as child-centered, multisensory way as
                                > >>> possible (blindfolding and letting the kids touch the objects so
                                > >>> that they can create a picture in their minds....). My main goal is
                                > >>> to create a foundation and encourage a love for drawing, enabling
                                > >>> the children to feel as much success as possible.
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > Who can direct me to some good resources?
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > Thanks and have a great weekend,
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > Lauren
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > Lauren R. Perlman
                                > >>> > Founder/Director
                                > >>> > Mummies and Masterpieces
                                > >>> &! gt; mummiesandmasterpieces.com
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > Sent from my iPhone
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > On Jun 24, 2011, at 10:19 AM, Robin Mitchell breeleo@ wrote:
                                > >>> >
                                > >>> > I have just finished my 24th year, and several times have
                                > >>> received mixed messages like yours. I really like Brandy's reply as
                                > >>> it is the most diplomatic. We have the same situation with constant
                                > >>> emails in our school. One gets behind if they do not check them.
                                > >>> Take Brandy's advice and add on....How would you have me keep up on
                                > >>> our emils during the day?
                                > >>> > Good luck, Robin
                                > >>> >
                                > >>>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >
                                > >
                                >


                              • padillapost
                                The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is I draw, you draw . If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board.. A few years back, an
                                Message 15 of 28 , Jul 3, 2011
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                                  "The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board.."

                                  A few years back, an organization hired me to teach afterschool art. I had to teach to their method [described as above w a few variations ie we started w a grid..ie folding the paper in 4ths!]. The resulting art works were amazing.

                                  It was not until my contract ended that I realized I was not being sent to teach 'gifted' groups, rather I was visiting regular ol' after school, in the cafeteria, 'babysitting' drawing until parent picked the kids up. The method worked and kids proudly ran out to parents waving their art above their heads with shear joy.

                                  Thanks for the reminder, Susan. I need to add this method to my own rotation of youth workshops.

                                  Cynthia
                                  CPadilla, art workshops across TX, NM, CO, CT, MA, MO, KS, Canada, Central America, Internationally: http://www.artinstructor.blogspot.com/


                                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery <susungallery@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between. They'll love they're results.
                                  >
                                  > The best to you in Art.
                                  > Susun Gallery
                                  > susungallery.com
                                • Susun Gallery
                                  Thanks Cynthia, I used to run a program called, Artschool on Wheels. We d haul a 28 trailer classroom into underserved areas of Santa Cruz County, namely
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Jul 3, 2011
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                                    Thanks Cynthia,

                                    I used to run a program called, Artschool on Wheels.  We'd haul a 28' trailer classroom into underserved areas of Santa Cruz County, namely Watsonville and Pajaro...industrial residential areas, migrant and farm communities, and neighborhoods where they had no after school parents.  Sometimes we had only pencils and paper, the sky above us and the sidewalk below.

                                    Buenas epocas,
                                    Susun

                                    On Jul 3, 2011, at 10:29 AM, padillapost wrote:

                                     

                                    "The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board.."

                                    A few years back, an organization hired me to teach afterschool art. I had to teach to their method [described as above w a few variations ie we started w a grid..ie folding the paper in 4ths!]. The resulting art works were amazing.

                                    It was not until my contract ended that I realized I was not being sent to teach 'gifted' groups, rather I was visiting regular ol' after school, in the cafeteria, 'babysitting' drawing until parent picked the kids up. The method worked and kids proudly ran out to parents waving their art above their heads with shear joy.

                                    Thanks for the reminder, Susan. I need to add this method to my own rotation of youth workshops.

                                    Cynthia
                                    CPadilla, art workshops across TX, NM, CO, CT, MA, MO, KS, Canada, Central America, Internationally: http://www.artinstructor.blogspot.com/

                                    --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery <susungallery@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between. They'll love they're results.
                                    >
                                    > The best to you in Art.
                                    > Susun Gallery
                                    > susungallery.com


                                  • Kathleen Maledon
                                    I m not trying to be disagreeable, but i watched an after-school class use that method for drawing (copying from a teacher using the white board). Yes, they
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Jul 5, 2011
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                                      I'm not trying to be disagreeable, but i watched an after-school class use that method for drawing
                                      (copying from a teacher using the white board).  Yes, they walked out with a finished drawing,
                                      but they only copied "Put a large circle here.  Make a squiggly line like this here....
                                      They outlined in blk marker and colored in the picture with markers.  Why is that drawing in the
                                      true sense?  I can have all my kids draw an orange, banana, and grapes because they learn shapes in K.
                                      I preceded drawing like you, I'm sure, by shape hunts inside and outside, in pictures, etc.  They can find 
                                      them, but the difficulty lies in transferring them in relationships on their paper.  The 'squiggly line'
                                      causes them to pause.  Holding a pencil, drawing lightly, 'fleshing out' a dominant shape, overlap-
                                      ping are all part of the drawing process.  Have I fallen off my rocker in my old age, or am I 
                                      missing something important?  k
                                      On Jul 3, 2011, at 1:12 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:

                                      Thanks Cynthia,


                                      I used to run a program called, Artschool on Wheels.  We'd haul a 28' trailer classroom into underserved areas of Santa Cruz County, namely Watsonville and Pajaro...industrial residential areas, migrant and farm communities, and neighborhoods where they had no after school parents.  Sometimes we had only pencils and paper, the sky above us and the sidewalk below.

                                      Buenas epocas,
                                      Susun

                                      On Jul 3, 2011, at 10:29 AM, padillapost wrote:

                                       

                                      "The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board.."

                                      A few years back, an organization hired me to teach afterschool art. I had to teach to their method [described as above w a few variations ie we started w a grid..ie folding the paper in 4ths!]. The resulting art works were amazing. 

                                      It was not until my contract ended that I realized I was not being sent to teach 'gifted' groups, rather I was visiting regular ol' after school, in the cafeteria, 'babysitting' drawing until parent picked the kids up. The method worked and kids proudly ran out to parents waving their art above their heads with shear joy. 

                                      Thanks for the reminder, Susan. I need to add this method to my own rotation of youth workshops.

                                      Cynthia 
                                      CPadilla, art workshops across TX, NM, CO, CT, MA, MO, KS, Canada, Central America, Internationally: http://www.artinstructor.blogspot.com/

                                      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery <susungallery@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between. They'll love they're results.
                                      > 
                                      > The best to you in Art.
                                      > Susun Gallery
                                      > susungallery.com




                                    • Susun Gallery
                                      hmmm...sounds like step by step formula drawing, or like the method Mona Brook s uses in her book. She did a lot of marker drawings and made interpretations
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Jul 5, 2011
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                                        hmmm...sounds like step by step formula drawing, or like the method Mona Brook's uses in her book.  She did a lot of marker drawings and made interpretations regarding shapes.  That does sound like preK level drawing.  Do you remember the Walter T. Foster drawing books?  I like Walter, but as a child, I was appalled when he suggested that I draw a dog out of circles and squares.  I just couldn't wrap my brain around that.  He used to sign his paintings WTF, he wouldn't do that now, but that's how I felt.  

                                        I guess it depends on the teacher, and the age group of the audience.  I rarely suggest that a shape is a circle, or use analogies to describe shapes.   Better to keep them nameless, so not to create stigma, and leave room for interpretation.  I just draw to music, or tell a story about the drawing, and then pause, here and there, to let students catch up a bit.  Then I  go around and see if everyone is on target, or at least willing to try.  If they seem frustrated, then I smile, and ask that they just sit back and watch. 

                                        Perhaps mention that the white board is just an enlarged version of their paper, be it vertical or horizontal, but that spacial relationships still apply.  Some teachers are not able to draw much more than a linear contour drawing on a white board, it takes practice.  I can shade, create half tones, and get some pretty realistic results (except when it comes to cartooning, and then we just have fun with it, and recycle our drawings at the end of class).  My students can create better form, using their pencils.

                                        It's different from my perspective, because I don't have to send home finished drawings to impress the parents or the administration.  I'm more concerned about what's going on in their brains, than the end result. You sound like a seasoned art  teacher, perhaps the squiggle caused stigma with the class you observed.  That would be hard to interpret if I wasn't familiar with that word.  I'm teaching my sixteen year old son to drive.  Last night I said, "Stop behind the line...good, now just kiddie korner over to the left and keep going."  He turned left...  I said, "NO,  I meant toward the left and keep going".   He said, "I'm sorry, but I don't understand your ancient terms,  just say right, left, or straight ahead".

                                        I give...I think I'm ready for a rocker sometimes.
                                        Susun

                                         

                                         
                                        On Jul 5, 2011, at 4:07 PM, Kathleen Maledon wrote:

                                         

                                        I'm not trying to be disagreeable, but i watched an after-school class use that method for drawing

                                        (copying from a teacher using the white board).  Yes, they walked out with a finished drawing,
                                        but they only copied "Put a large circle here.  Make a squiggly line like this here....
                                        They outlined in blk marker and colored in the picture with markers.  Why is that drawing in the
                                        true sense?  I can have all my kids draw an orange, banana, and grapes because they learn shapes in K.
                                        I preceded drawing like you, I'm sure, by shape hunts inside and outside, in pictures, etc.  They can find 
                                        them, but the difficulty lies in transferring them in relationships on their paper.  The 'squiggly line'
                                        causes them to pause.  Holding a pencil, drawing lightly, 'fleshing out' a dominant shape, overlap-
                                        ping are all part of the drawing process.  Have I fallen off my rocker in my old age, or am I 
                                        missing something important?  k
                                        On Jul 3, 2011, at 1:12 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:

                                        Thanks Cynthia,


                                        I used to run a program called, Artschool on Wheels.  We'd haul a 28' trailer classroom into underserved areas of Santa Cruz County, namely Watsonville and Pajaro...industrial residential areas, migrant and farm communities, and neighborhoods where they had no after school parents.  Sometimes we had only pencils and paper, t! he sky above us and the sidewalk below.

                                        Buenas epocas,
                                        Susun

                                        On Jul 3, 2011, at 10:29 AM, padillapost wrote:

                                         

                                        "The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board.."

                                        A few years back, an organization hired me to teach afterschool art. I had to teach to their method [described as above w a few variations ie we started w a grid..ie folding the paper in 4ths!]. The resulting art works were amazing. 

                                        It was not until my contract ended that I realized I was not being sent to teach 'gifted' groups, rather I was visiting regular ol' after school, in the cafeteria, 'babysitting' drawing until parent picked the kids up. The method worked and kids proudly ran out to parents waving their art above their heads with shear joy. 

                                        Thanks for the reminder, Susan. I need to add this method to my own rotation of youth workshops.

                                        Cynthia 
                                        CPadilla, art workshops across TX, NM, CO, CT, MA, MO, KS, Canada, Central America, Internationally: http://www.artinstructor.blogspot.com/

                                        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery <susungallery@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board, and wi! th an excellent cartooning book and have some fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-between. They'll love they're results.
                                        > 
                                        > The best to you in Art.
                                        > Susun Gallery
                                        > susungallery.com






                                      • Brandy
                                        There is value when combined with other more open ended methods. This idea can hold a lot water for students that had already labeled themselves poor
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Jul 6, 2011
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                                          There is value when combined with other more open ended methods. This idea can hold a lot water for students that had already labeled themselves "poor drawers/bad artists/etc."
                                          I definitely see a value to it now and then. Just like computer programming or photoshopping, after you've gone over the example project with them, it's best to set them free and say, "do this task" (which is an open ended version of what we just learned/you just taught). At this moment you will see if the student understood what s/he was doing and can use those skills the next time s/he comes to a task that requires them.
                                          My lesson scheme has drawing exercises in it, when I see a class struggling, we will go over a step by step process. The next time, we'll see what held and do it over again later if the class, A. enjoyed the process, B. is improving from it at all and c. it's not impeding their creative growth (like now the only thing they will draw is only what I've shown them.).
                                          I usually have at least one drawing exercise- like Vasarely- that requires that I show them the process step by step. The homework is to "make it your own".
                                          I think all tools and methods have their time and place and can add value to our classes if used well:)
                                          Brandy


                                          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I'm not trying to be disagreeable, but i watched an after-school class
                                          > use that method for drawing
                                          > (copying from a teacher using the white board). Yes, they walked out
                                          > with a finished drawing,
                                          > but they only copied "Put a large circle here. Make a squiggly line
                                          > like this here....
                                          > They outlined in blk marker and colored in the picture with markers.
                                          > Why is that drawing in the
                                          > true sense? I can have all my kids draw an orange, banana, and grapes
                                          > because they learn shapes in K.
                                          > I preceded drawing like you, I'm sure, by shape hunts inside and
                                          > outside, in pictures, etc. They can find
                                          > them, but the difficulty lies in transferring them in relationships on
                                          > their paper. The 'squiggly line'
                                          > causes them to pause. Holding a pencil, drawing lightly, 'fleshing
                                          > out' a dominant shape, overlap-
                                          > ping are all part of the drawing process. Have I fallen off my rocker
                                          > in my old age, or am I
                                          > missing something important? k
                                          > On Jul 3, 2011, at 1:12 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:
                                          >
                                          > > Thanks Cynthia,
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > I used to run a program called, Artschool on Wheels. We'd haul a
                                          > > 28' trailer classroom into underserved areas of Santa Cruz County,
                                          > > namely Watsonville and Pajaro...industrial residential areas,
                                          > > migrant and farm communities, and neighborhoods where they had no
                                          > > after school parents. Sometimes we had only pencils and paper, the
                                          > > sky above us and the sidewalk below.
                                          > >
                                          > > Buenas epocas,
                                          > > Susun
                                          > >
                                          > > On Jul 3, 2011, at 10:29 AM, padillapost wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > >>
                                          > >> "The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".
                                          > >> If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board.."
                                          > >>
                                          > >> A few years back, an organization hired me to teach afterschool
                                          > >> art. I had to teach to their method [described as above w a few
                                          > >> variations ie we started w a grid..ie folding the paper in 4ths!].
                                          > >> The resulting art works were amazing.
                                          > >>
                                          > >> It was not until my contract ended that I realized I was not being
                                          > >> sent to teach 'gifted' groups, rather I was visiting regular ol'
                                          > >> after school, in the cafeteria, 'babysitting' drawing until parent
                                          > >> picked the kids up. The method worked and kids proudly ran out to
                                          > >> parents waving their art above their heads with shear joy.
                                          > >>
                                          > >> Thanks for the reminder, Susan. I need to add this method to my own
                                          > >> rotation of youth workshops.
                                          > >>
                                          > >> Cynthia
                                          > >> CPadilla, art workshops across TX, NM, CO, CT, MA, MO, KS, Canada,
                                          > >> Central America, Internationally: http://www.artinstructor.blogspot.com/
                                          > >>
                                          > >> --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery
                                          > >> <susungallery@> wrote:
                                          > >> >
                                          > >> >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you
                                          > >> draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white
                                          > >> board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some
                                          > >> fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too
                                          > >> fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-
                                          > >> between. They'll love they're results.
                                          > >> >
                                          > >> > The best to you in Art.
                                          > >> > Susun Gallery
                                          > >> > susungallery.com
                                          > >>
                                          > >>
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          >
                                        • Resp
                                          When teaching younger students(k-2), I have them follow along as we discover and draw shapes together but they do sometimes end up with similar results. I
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Jul 7, 2011
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                                            When teaching younger students(k-2), I have them follow along as we discover and draw shapes together but they do sometimes end up with similar results. I encourage them to complete the drawing to make it their own and take down any examples I have drawn because they are copycats! I want them to appreciate their own styles.

                                            Robin in CO


                                            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Brandy" <bergiemoore@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > There is value when combined with other more open ended methods. This idea can hold a lot water for students that had already labeled themselves "poor drawers/bad artists/etc."
                                            > I definitely see a value to it now and then. Just like computer programming or photoshopping, after you've gone over the example project with them, it's best to set them free and say, "do this task" (which is an open ended version of what we just learned/you just taught). At this moment you will see if the student understood what s/he was doing and can use those skills the next time s/he comes to a task that requires them.
                                            > My lesson scheme has drawing exercises in it, when I see a class struggling, we will go over a step by step process. The next time, we'll see what held and do it over again later if the class, A. enjoyed the process, B. is improving from it at all and c. it's not impeding their creative growth (like now the only thing they will draw is only what I've shown them.).
                                            > I usually have at least one drawing exercise- like Vasarely- that requires that I show them the process step by step. The homework is to "make it your own".
                                            > I think all tools and methods have their time and place and can add value to our classes if used well:)
                                            > Brandy
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > I'm not trying to be disagreeable, but i watched an after-school class
                                            > > use that method for drawing
                                            > > (copying from a teacher using the white board). Yes, they walked out
                                            > > with a finished drawing,
                                            > > but they only copied "Put a large circle here. Make a squiggly line
                                            > > like this here....
                                            > > They outlined in blk marker and colored in the picture with markers.
                                            > > Why is that drawing in the
                                            > > true sense? I can have all my kids draw an orange, banana, and grapes
                                            > > because they learn shapes in K.
                                            > > I preceded drawing like you, I'm sure, by shape hunts inside and
                                            > > outside, in pictures, etc. They can find
                                            > > them, but the difficulty lies in transferring them in relationships on
                                            > > their paper. The 'squiggly line'
                                            > > causes them to pause. Holding a pencil, drawing lightly, 'fleshing
                                            > > out' a dominant shape, overlap-
                                            > > ping are all part of the drawing process. Have I fallen off my rocker
                                            > > in my old age, or am I
                                            > > missing something important? k
                                            > > On Jul 3, 2011, at 1:12 PM, Susun Gallery wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > > Thanks Cynthia,
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > I used to run a program called, Artschool on Wheels. We'd haul a
                                            > > > 28' trailer classroom into underserved areas of Santa Cruz County,
                                            > > > namely Watsonville and Pajaro...industrial residential areas,
                                            > > > migrant and farm communities, and neighborhoods where they had no
                                            > > > after school parents. Sometimes we had only pencils and paper, the
                                            > > > sky above us and the sidewalk below.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Buenas epocas,
                                            > > > Susun
                                            > > >
                                            > > > On Jul 3, 2011, at 10:29 AM, padillapost wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >> "The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you draw".
                                            > > >> If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white board.."
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >> A few years back, an organization hired me to teach afterschool
                                            > > >> art. I had to teach to their method [described as above w a few
                                            > > >> variations ie we started w a grid..ie folding the paper in 4ths!].
                                            > > >> The resulting art works were amazing.
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >> It was not until my contract ended that I realized I was not being
                                            > > >> sent to teach 'gifted' groups, rather I was visiting regular ol'
                                            > > >> after school, in the cafeteria, 'babysitting' drawing until parent
                                            > > >> picked the kids up. The method worked and kids proudly ran out to
                                            > > >> parents waving their art above their heads with shear joy.
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >> Thanks for the reminder, Susan. I need to add this method to my own
                                            > > >> rotation of youth workshops.
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >> Cynthia
                                            > > >> CPadilla, art workshops across TX, NM, CO, CT, MA, MO, KS, Canada,
                                            > > >> Central America, Internationally: http://www.artinstructor.blogspot.com/
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >> --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Susun Gallery
                                            > > >> <susungallery@> wrote:
                                            > > >> >
                                            > > >> >> The best way to teach drawing, hands down, is "I draw, you
                                            > > >> draw". If you can draw, get the kids face forward to a giant white
                                            > > >> board, and with an excellent cartooning book and have some
                                            > > >> fun...pencils, a ream of copy paper, and a sense of humor. Not too
                                            > > >> fast, just shapes connected to shapes, with some silly stories in-
                                            > > >> between. They'll love they're results.
                                            > > >> >
                                            > > >> > The best to you in Art.
                                            > > >> > Susun Gallery
                                            > > >> > susungallery.com
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >>
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • Susan Michael
                                            I think some students do have a natural ability to see and then draw what they see. (Perhaps it is like picking up reading easily.) When I am working with
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Jul 7, 2011
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                                              I think some students do have a natural ability to "see" and then draw what they see. (Perhaps it is like picking up reading easily.) When I am working with beginning students I focus on the process of the medium over end result. When I start a demonstration I draw with my non- dominant hand, which can be shaky. I always tell them that everyone starts as a beginner.  Students who haven't drawn much before can be intimidated by "more talented" drawing. Recognizing that some things are easier to draw than others is also helpful. When my daughter was learning to draw she had a problem with noses. I told her everyone has trouble with noses. We looked through many examples and tutorials and I let her decided how she would represent a nose. I even mentioned that some people leave out the nose. This of course depends on the age and level of the student, but with young students it is what I encourage.
                                              For parents that don't think they are creative or talented in art I try to encourage them to not draw representative shapes for objects. i.e. a triangle on top of a square for a house, etc. Instead, look at a real house. Kids who are truly interested/ passionate about art have an advantage when transitioning to the next level/ more difficult drawing because they can persevere . My daughter draws better than I do because she draws every day. My medium is in a different area but I know if I practiced more I would draw better also. Susan Michael
                                            • Dan
                                              Here are my techniques via my blog. Art Makes Kids Smart: Drawing in the Drawing Studio Art Makes Kids Smart: Drawing with Ed Emberly Art Makes Kids Smart:
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Jul 11, 2011
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                                                Here are my techniques via my blog. 
                                                 
                                                 

                                                I think some students do have a natural ability to "see" and then draw what they see. (Perhaps it is like picking up reading easily.) When I am working with beginning students I focus on the process of the medium over end result. When I start a demonstration I draw with my non- dominant hand, which can be shaky. I always tell them that everyone starts as a beginner.  Students who haven't drawn much before can be intimidated by "more talented" drawing. Recognizing that some things are easier to draw than others is also helpful. When my daughter was learning to draw she had a problem with noses. I told her everyone has trouble with noses. We looked through many examples and tutorials and I let her decided how she would represent a nose. I even mentioned that some people leave out the nose. This of course depends on the age and level of the student, but with young students it is what I encourage.
                                                For parents that don't think they are creative or talented in art I try to encourage them to not draw representative shapes for objects. i.e. a triangle on top of a square for a house, etc. Instead, look at a real house. Kids who are truly interested/ passionate about art have an advantage when transitioning to the next level/ more difficult drawing because they can persevere . My daughter draws better than I do because she draws every day. My medium is in a different area but I know if I practiced more I would draw better also. Susan Michael
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