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Cubism

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  • Lois
    How do start a Cubism picture. And is there rules, to the color scheme. Would like to try cubism. Thanks for any information, or books for Beginner. Lois
    Message 1 of 8 , May 14, 2011
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      How do start a Cubism picture.
      And is there rules, to the color scheme.
      Would like to try cubism.
      Thanks for any information, or books for Beginner.
      Lois
    • Jeff Pridie
      The best way to start is use subject matter that can easily be transformed into angular shapes in their simplest forms. This is what I have done for my
      Message 2 of 8 , May 14, 2011
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        The best way to start is use subject matter that can easily be transformed into angular shapes in their simplest forms.  This is what I have done for my students: we set up a stilllife with a variety of forms, they can either freehand the image and work only in straight lines (outlines, less the contour lines), no curves (use pencil or charcoal).  Students then are asked to subtract some of the lines breaking into forms making some areas larger.  For students who struggle with this you can photo graph the stilllife and photo copy it.  Students can use tracing paper or a light table and break down the image as suggested above with the free handing drawing.  Have students examine cubist paintings to identify a color scheme for their own cubist designs.  Students could use paint, crayons, oil pastels, chalk as the medium to color it in.  Cubism takes images to a simple but complex compositional mode.  Have fun exploring.

        Jeff (Minnesota)


         

        How do start a Cubism picture.
        And is there rules, to the color scheme.
        Would like to try cubism.
        Thanks for any information, or books for Beginner.
        Lois

      • Billie Dreher
        I have a 30 - 45 minute excersize that will help them to create an abstract drawing without much stress. This idea might help you to transition them to cubism
        Message 3 of 8 , May 14, 2011
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           I have a 30 - 45 minute excersize that will help them to create an abstract drawing without much stress. This idea might help you to transition them to cubism and more abstract styles of painting.  I set up the still life of bottles and vases.  Prior to this class, students would have been introduced to abstract art.  For this excersize, students are encouraged to "expand" on what they see - drawing extorted/ enhanced versions of what is in front of them.  

          Students are given a sheet of drawing paper - usually 9 x 12".  I use drawing boards and chairs...no tables for this project.  Students simply draw what's in front of them for 3 minutes - using light pencil.  The shapes may be exaggerated and simplified for a more abstract feel.  Also, each student has a "view finder" to help compose what portion of the still appeals to them.  After the 3 minutes I call time and students move across the room.  From this new spot, the student draws the still life again - but on top of the one already on the paper.  This repeats one more time as students move for the last time.  At their tables, students will expand their drawing with oil pastels and other dry media, including marker.  The kids really enjoy the experience.  They are relaxed and usually very surprised at how "abstract" their drawing looks. 
          Billie Ann Dreher



          From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...>
          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sat, May 14, 2011 7:00:21 PM
          Subject: Re: [art_education] Cubism

           


          The best way to start is use subject matter that can easily be transformed into angular shapes in their simplest forms.  This is what I have done for my students: we set up a stilllife with a variety of forms, they can either freehand the image and work only in straight lines (outlines, less the contour lines), no curves (use pencil or charcoal).  Students then are asked to subtract some of the lines breaking into forms making some areas larger.  For students who struggle with this you can photo graph the stilllife and photo copy it.  Students can use tracing paper or a light table and break down the image as suggested above with the free handing drawing.  Have students examine cubist paintings to identify a color scheme for their own cubist designs.  Students could use paint, crayons, oil pastels, chalk as the medium to color it in.  Cubism takes images to a simple but complex compositional mode.  Have fun exploring.

          Jeff (Minnesota)


           

          How do start a Cubism picture.
          And is there rules, to the color scheme.
          Would like to try cubism.
          Thanks for any information, or books for Beginner.
          Lois

        • priorhouse
          Hi Lois, here is a bit more to add to the topic of Cubism: Most of our Cubism lessons include using a ruler and protractor to make some of the lines and
          Message 4 of 8 , May 14, 2011
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            Hi Lois, here is a bit more to add to the topic of Cubism:

            Most of our Cubism lessons include using a ruler and protractor to make some of the lines and shapes. Many students make a monochromatic piece (but color options vary). One classic lesson includes studying Picasso's Le Guitariste, (1910) and as student's discover parts of the guitar, the person, and various letters (mainly P's). Next, they then make their own piece incorporating their creative ideas (usually using various angles, lines, and broken down item pieces).

            In my experience, Cubism pictures are a nice project to do with any skill level. I have had older students really enjoy (and expound upon) some of the rich math that hides in many Cubist pieces (like hyperbola, angles, and locus of points) and so there are probably many levels and areas of interest to teach with Cubism! I usually give out a small info sheet for students to keep and sometimes it includes the following (not sure where I attained the below info, but it sums it up pretty well):

            "In cubist art pieces, objects are broken up, analyzed, and re-assembled in an abstracted form—instead of depicting objects from one viewpoint, the artist depicts the subject from a multitude of viewpoints to represent the subject in a greater context. Often the surfaces intersect at seemingly random angles, removing a coherent sense of depth. The background and object planes interpenetrate one another to create the shallow ambiguous space, one of cubism's distinct characteristics. Cubism was a 20th century avant-garde art movement, pioneered by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music, literature and architecture. The first branch of cubism, known as Analytic Cubism, was both radical and influential as a short, but highly significant art movement between 1907 and 1911 in France. In its second phase, Synthetic Cubism, the movement spread and remained vital until around 1919, when the Surrealist movement gained popularity."

            HTH,

            Mrs. Prior in VA

            --
            > The best way to start is use subject matter that can easily be transformed into
            > angular shapes in their simplest forms.
            > Cubism takes images to a simple but complex compositional mode. Have fun
            > exploring.
            >
            > Jeff (Minnesota)

            >
            > How do start a Cubism picture.
            > And is there rules, to the color scheme.
            > Would like to try cubism.
            > Thanks for any information, or books for Beginner.
            > Lois
          • Amanda
            I do a similar approach to the multi angle 3 min drawings. Students fold an A3 page into four and draw four different angles of a still life. Then we split the
            Message 5 of 8 , May 15, 2011
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              I do a similar approach to the multi angle 3 min drawings. 
              Students fold an A3 page into four and draw four different angles of a still life. Then we split the four drawings and lay them one over the the other. Then they cut through them all together with a pair of scissors and carefully lay them on the table. Each portion of the cut up image is peeled away until the locate the layer that is the most visually interesting for each portion. The result is then traced with tracing paper including the scissor lines.  This is then shaded dark to light - each section in a different direction discussing Cezanne's "passage" technique. The reultant image looks exactly like an Analytical Cubist drawing. Kids love it and learn to appreciate the style without me 'lecturing' them about its importance. Translates well to a painting too.

              Hope that helps.

              :)
              Amanda 


              Sent from my iPhone
            • Billie Dreher
              amanda very cool idea...i see lot s of other applications too. Thank you for sharing Billie Ann Dreher ________________________________ From: Amanda
              Message 6 of 8 , May 15, 2011
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                amanda
                very cool idea...i see lot's of other applications too.  Thank you for sharing
                 
                Billie Ann Dreher



                From: Amanda <amanda.marsh72@...>
                To: "art_education@yahoogroups.com" <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sun, May 15, 2011 4:35:14 AM
                Subject: [art_education] Re: Cubism

                 

                I do a similar approach to the multi angle 3 min drawings. 
                Students fold an A3 page into four and draw four different angles of a still life. Then we split the four drawings and lay them one over the the other. Then they cut through them all together with a pair of scissors and carefully lay them on the table. Each portion of the cut up image is peeled away until the locate the layer that is the most visually interesting for each portion. The result is then traced with tracing paper including the scissor lines.  This is then shaded dark to light - each section in a different direction discussing Cezanne's "passage" technique. The reultant image looks exactly like an Analytical Cubist drawing. Kids love it and learn to appreciate the style without me 'lecturing' them about its importance. Translates well to a painting too.

                Hope that helps.

                :)
                Amanda 


                Sent from my iPhone
              • pent19
                We do a picasso portrait, putting half a front view and profile view together. I have them use unusual colors (complementaries) and create a broken background.
                Message 7 of 8 , May 15, 2011
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                  We do a picasso portrait, putting half a front view and profile view together. I have them use unusual colors (complementaries) and create a broken background. This is done with 4th graders. When I worked with high schoolers I had them draw a still life (with bottles, violons, etc) then use a ruler and create diagonal lines across the still life. They then completed the drawing by finishing each shape in a different medium. Newspaper with charcoal on it, tissue paper, pencil drawing, etc.
                  Michele

                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "priorhouse" <priorhouse@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Lois, here is a bit more to add to the topic of Cubism:
                  >
                  > Most of our Cubism lessons include using a ruler and protractor to make some of the lines and shapes. Many students make a monochromatic piece (but color options vary). One classic lesson includes studying Picasso's Le Guitariste, (1910) and as student's discover parts of the guitar, the person, and various letters (mainly P's). Next, they then make their own piece incorporating their creative ideas (usually using various angles, lines, and broken down item pieces).
                  >
                  > In my experience, Cubism pictures are a nice project to do with any skill level. I have had older students really enjoy (and expound upon) some of the rich math that hides in many Cubist pieces (like hyperbola, angles, and locus of points) and so there are probably many levels and areas of interest to teach with Cubism! I usually give out a small info sheet for students to keep and sometimes it includes the following (not sure where I attained the below info, but it sums it up pretty well):
                  >
                  > "In cubist art pieces, objects are broken up, analyzed, and re-assembled in an abstracted form—instead of depicting objects from one viewpoint, the artist depicts the subject from a multitude of viewpoints to represent the subject in a greater context. Often the surfaces intersect at seemingly random angles, removing a coherent sense of depth. The background and object planes interpenetrate one another to create the shallow ambiguous space, one of cubism's distinct characteristics. Cubism was a 20th century avant-garde art movement, pioneered by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music, literature and architecture. The first branch of cubism, known as Analytic Cubism, was both radical and influential as a short, but highly significant art movement between 1907 and 1911 in France. In its second phase, Synthetic Cubism, the movement spread and remained vital until around 1919, when the Surrealist movement gained popularity."
                  >
                  > HTH,
                  >
                  > Mrs. Prior in VA
                  >
                  > --
                  > > The best way to start is use subject matter that can easily be transformed into
                  > > angular shapes in their simplest forms.
                  > > Cubism takes images to a simple but complex compositional mode. Have fun
                  > > exploring.
                  > >
                  > > Jeff (Minnesota)
                  >
                  > >
                  > > How do start a Cubism picture.
                  > > And is there rules, to the color scheme.
                  > > Would like to try cubism.
                  > > Thanks for any information, or books for Beginner.
                  > > Lois
                  >
                • Lois
                  Thank you to all, who commented on this subject. Appreciate it very much. All of you gave me some good, starting points. Lois
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 15, 2011
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                    Thank you to all, who commented on this subject.
                    Appreciate it very much.
                    All of you gave me some good, starting points.
                    Lois
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