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Re: [art_education] Ideas for Professional Development for staff using art as focus

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  • Kathleen Maledon
    how about making a scrapbook page with photos and other stuff from their teaching? Have them texturize the page (lots of art techniques) and add the rest.
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 9, 2011
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      how about making a scrapbook page with photos and other stuff from their teaching?
      Have them texturize the page (lots of art techniques) and add the rest.  They can hang it in their classrooms
      as a reminder and inspiration.  One of the more fun activities I've done with teachers is have everyone draw 
      a picture of themselves.  These anonymous portraits are hung or tabled and labeled with a #.
      Other teachers guess who is who.  It's amazing the hidden talents and insights.  Rule: no
      stick figures.  k
      On Mar 9, 2011, at 4:58 AM, barb wrote:

      I've been brainstorming ways to use the process of creating and enjoying art production as staff development professional development. I'd love to hear your ideas for motivating non-art teachers to participate together in an artistic project about 2 hours duration. I will include extra time for reflection.
      Also, have you used your skills to lead school-wide P.D. which included the entire staff and faculty of a school? I'm looking to do this at a college, but would welcome any ideas you have. The big idea behind this is that everyone is important at the school, everyone contributes to the environment and to the student no matter what their role at the school. This includes administration. 
      Thanks in advance! We know how powerful art can be!
      Barbara Yalof


    • Lauren
      How about asking them to paint something from their own school experiences????? A classmate, teacher, book they read, class trip, locker, hallway,
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 9, 2011
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        How about asking them to paint something from their own school experiences????? A classmate, teacher, book they read, class trip, locker, hallway, playground....and then explain why that sticks out in their minds regarding memories of school.

        I would not use white paper. Perhaps beige. White is intimidating to those who feel they need to fill every inch. Large brushes help, too, in case some educators don't want to use smaller ones. Large brushes will fill space faster;-)

        Good luck!

        Lauren



        Lauren R. Perlman
        Founder/Director
        Mummies and Masterpieces
         

        Sent from my iPhone 

        On Mar 9, 2011, at 5:12 PM, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:

         

        how about making a scrapbook page with photos and other stuff from their teaching?

        Have them texturize the page (lots of art techniques) and add the rest.  They can hang it in their classrooms
        as a reminder and inspiration.  One of the more fun activities I've done with teachers is have everyone draw 
        a picture of themselves.  These anonymous portraits are hung or tabled and labeled with a #.
        Other teachers guess who is who.  It's amazing the hidden talents and insights.  Rule: no
        stick figures.  k
        On Mar 9, 2011, at 4:58 AM, barb wrote:

        I've been brainstorming ways to use the process of creating and enjoying art production as staff development professional development. I'd love to hear your ideas for motivating non-art teachers to participate together in an artistic project about 2 hours duration. I will include extra time for reflection.
        Also, have you used your skills to lead school-wide P.D. which included the entire staff and faculty of a school? I'm looking to do this at a college, but would welcome any ideas you have. The big idea behind this is that everyone is important at the school, everyone contributes to the environment and to the student no matter what their role at the school. This includes administration. 
        Thanks in advance! We know how powerful art can be!
        Barbara Yalof



      • Byrd1956
        I did one w/the school board one time and we all made coil pots. They or their children glazed them. Everyone had a great time.
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 10, 2011
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          I did one w/the school board one time and we all made coil pots. They or their children glazed them. Everyone had a great time.
        • Shelley Bloom
          I have had great success doing mandalas with adult school groups including staff, administration, PTO, Board members and faculty. I begin with a short history
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 11, 2011
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            I have had great success doing mandalas with adult school groups including staff, administration, PTO, Board members and faculty.  I begin with a short history of how mandala has been used throughout history - throughout the world.  I have them choose either a black or white paper and they trace a circle from paper plates I provide, or draw a freehand circle.  I give them a choice of colored pencils or oil pastels.  All of this takes about 5-10 minutes.  Once everyone is settled down with the materials ready to go, I have them close their eyes and do some deep breathing. 

            I find that giving them a theme makes it easier for them to get started.  For instance, I have them think of a place they enjoy spending time in and imagine the colors and shapes that go with that place.  Or, they can imagine a flower that describes who they are, again, imagining what colors and shapes might come to mind.  Once I've suggested an idea, and we have done some breathing, I tell them I will be putting on some background music.  When they hear the music, they can open their eyes and begin their mandala. 

            I remind them that there is no right or wrong way to do this.  If they are stuck I suggest they begin in the middle and let the colors and shapes grow - without too much concern. 

            There are always a few that have a difficult time beginning - too much of a critical eye - but once they get started, they immediately become engaged.  I like to leave 10-15 minutes to share the work and talk about what it was like for them to experience art making in this way.

            It is a great example of how art can help integrate the brain.  They will notice that they are much more relaxed at the end of the exercise compared to the beginning.

            Good luck!
            Shelley

            --
            Shelley Bloom, MFT, ATR
            Director of Counseling, Art Teacher
            Chatsworth Hills Academy
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