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Re: I have a very challenging situation and I need help

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  • Ken
    Cynthia, I am teaching a school administration internship class for a university right now and I posted the question to them for a solution. I ll let you know
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 5, 2011
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      Cynthia,

      I am teaching a school administration internship class for a university right now and I posted the question to them for a solution. I'll let you know what comes out of it.

      Ken

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "blamirecyn" <blamirecyn@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a class composed of eighteen first graders plus 8 autistic students combined. The autistic students come with three adult aides. It gets so very noisy that no one can hear me when I'm giving the class directions for an assignment. Students ask questions and I can barely hear them. A lot of them aren't following directions because they're distracted. I am stretched very thin. I cannot give any of them the attention they deserve. All of my classroom management skills aren't enough to hold their attention.
      >
      > I have never been asked for my input in this matter and although I've asked for help or guidance in making this work, I've gotten no help.
      >
      > Does anyone have any lesson plans that might work for a group like this? Any classroom management suggestions?
      >
      > Thank you.
      >
      > Feeling Frustrated
      >
    • aliteachesart
      Hi Cynthia, I have a similar situation with 18 busy kinders joined by 8 or 9 kids with diverse learning needs. I post all of my lessons with steps and
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 9, 2011
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        Hi Cynthia,

        I have a similar situation with 18 busy kinders joined by 8 or 9 kids with diverse learning needs. I post all of my lessons with steps and visuals, that way students (and aides) can check the directions (simple words with a picture) during art production. Sometimes it goes as well as other classes, other days I'm tearing my hair out- just because of the numbers of bodies in the room. Centers work really well with this group too. More kids means more noise, which must be very difficult for some of your spectrum kids. Do the gen. ed. kids know the other kids have challenges? Maybe read a simple book about Autism to them as a class and have them make books. Can you send the Special Ed. teacher your lesson plan ahead of time? The aides could pre-teach the lesson, or make up a picture line for the activity. If you can't work it out, can you have the kids push in to more classes- like two at a time? Can you take the class for their own art class once a week? The smaller class size would give you a chance to get to know the kids. Let us know how it goes. ALi k-4

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Ken" <kenroar@...> wrote:
        >
        > Cynthia,
        >
        > I am teaching a school administration internship class for a university right now and I posted the question to them for a solution. I'll let you know what comes out of it.
        >
        > Ken
        >
        > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "blamirecyn" <blamirecyn@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have a class composed of eighteen first graders plus 8 autistic students combined. The autistic students come with three adult aides. It gets so very noisy that no one can hear me when I'm giving the class directions for an assignment. Students ask questions and I can barely hear them. A lot of them aren't following directions because they're distracted. I am stretched very thin. I cannot give any of them the attention they deserve. All of my classroom management skills aren't enough to hold their attention.
        > >
        > > I have never been asked for my input in this matter and although I've asked for help or guidance in making this work, I've gotten no help.
        > >
        > > Does anyone have any lesson plans that might work for a group like this? Any classroom management suggestions?
        > >
        > > Thank you.
        > >
        > > Feeling Frustrated
        > >
        >
      • Helen Bolger
        Hi Ken, I m happy to put this up but will not have images of the children s work until I head back to the school this summer. I have quite a lot of handouts
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 11, 2011
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          Hi Ken,

          I'm happy to put this up but will not have images of the children's work
          until I head back to the school this summer. I have quite a lot of
          handouts and the demonstration pieces I created. Are you happy for me
          to do it now or wait?

          Thanks,

          Helen

          Ken wrote:
          > Helen,
          >
          > Don't forget you can also post them here in the list group so all can see. Simply go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/art_education/photos and upload them there. Make sure to create a photo album and then put something in the description of the photos so everyone knows what they pertain to.
          >
          > Ken
          >
          > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Helen Bolger <helen.bolger@...> wrote:
          >
          >> Hi,
          >>
          >> I worked with a school of children with a mix of disabilities, most very
          >> severe. Adult aides assisted the students and I met with the aides
          >> before beginning the project to encourage them to assist in the teaching
          >> process. I started the project using a powerpoint presentation in the
          >> main hall and then moved between 4 classrooms. Handouts were available
          >> on each table and demonstration pieces. It all worked really well and I
          >> have slides and lesson plan ( for school ages 3 to 12 years as I worked
          >> the whole school) The project seemed to capture their imagination and I
          >> hope to get photos when I return in the summer. If you'd like to see
          >> some of the demonstration pieces I can send images over to you.
          >>
          >> Helen UK
          >>
          >> blamirecyn wrote:
          >>
          >>> I have a class composed of eighteen first graders plus 8 autistic students combined. The autistic students come with three adult aides. It gets so very noisy that no one can hear me when I'm giving the class directions for an assignment. Students ask questions and I can barely hear them. A lot of them aren't following directions because they're distracted. I am stretched very thin. I cannot give any of them the attention they deserve. All of my classroom management skills aren't enough to hold their attention.
          >>>
          >>> I have never been asked for my input in this matter and although I've asked for help or guidance in making this work, I've gotten no help.
          >>>
          >>> Does anyone have any lesson plans that might work for a group like this? Any classroom management suggestions?
          >>>
          >>> Thank you.
          >>>
          >>> Feeling Frustrated
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Ken
          Go ahead an wait until you have everything and then post it all together. Ken
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 11, 2011
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            Go ahead an wait until you have everything and then post it all together.

            Ken

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Helen Bolger <helen.bolger@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Ken,
            >
            > I'm happy to put this up but will not have images of the children's work
            > until I head back to the school this summer. I have quite a lot of
            > handouts and the demonstration pieces I created. Are you happy for me
            > to do it now or wait?
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Helen
            >
            > Ken wrote:
            > > Helen,
            > >
            > > Don't forget you can also post them here in the list group so all can see. Simply go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/art_education/photos and upload them there. Make sure to create a photo album and then put something in the description of the photos so everyone knows what they pertain to.
            > >
            > > Ken
            > >
            > > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Helen Bolger <helen.bolger@> wrote:
            > >
            > >> Hi,
            > >>
            > >> I worked with a school of children with a mix of disabilities, most very
            > >> severe. Adult aides assisted the students and I met with the aides
            > >> before beginning the project to encourage them to assist in the teaching
            > >> process. I started the project using a powerpoint presentation in the
            > >> main hall and then moved between 4 classrooms. Handouts were available
            > >> on each table and demonstration pieces. It all worked really well and I
            > >> have slides and lesson plan ( for school ages 3 to 12 years as I worked
            > >> the whole school) The project seemed to capture their imagination and I
            > >> hope to get photos when I return in the summer. If you'd like to see
            > >> some of the demonstration pieces I can send images over to you.
            > >>
            > >> Helen UK
            > >>
            > >> blamirecyn wrote:
            > >>
            > >>> I have a class composed of eighteen first graders plus 8 autistic students combined. The autistic students come with three adult aides. It gets so very noisy that no one can hear me when I'm giving the class directions for an assignment. Students ask questions and I can barely hear them. A lot of them aren't following directions because they're distracted. I am stretched very thin. I cannot give any of them the attention they deserve. All of my classroom management skills aren't enough to hold their attention.
            > >>>
            > >>> I have never been asked for my input in this matter and although I've asked for help or guidance in making this work, I've gotten no help.
            > >>>
            > >>> Does anyone have any lesson plans that might work for a group like this? Any classroom management suggestions?
            > >>>
            > >>> Thank you.
            > >>>
            > >>> Feeling Frustrated
            > >>>
            > >>>
            > >>>
            > >>>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Ken
            As promised, I said I would post your issue in my online class. This class is comprised of school principal hopefuls who are working on their administrative
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 11, 2011
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              As promised, I said I would post your issue in my online class. This class is comprised of school principal hopefuls who are working on their administrative license. This is what they said:

              I like the instructional leadership strategies that you employ. Using visuals, clear expectations, and small groups would be effective suggestions to this teacher. What if this teacher didn't have the skills to pull it off? Are you in support of a situation like this? I am a special education teacher, and I have a hard time finding this scenario acceptable for a variety of reasons. It's one thing to expect a teacher to use a variety of methods to meet a variety of student needs; but, 26 first graders and 8 with autism would be challenging for everyone involved. Would you involve the special education staff in the discussion?
              ---

              There are several questions I have about this scenario. First, why are 8 students with autism assigned to the same first grade class? That is an exemplar of the oxymoron, "inclusion class." What is the rationale for 3 EAs? What kind of support or training has the teacher been provided on working with these students and/or have the EAs been provided in supporting students in the general education class? To answer these questions, I would have to start with the special education teacher.

              First, I would observe the classroom to determine the observable issues. Is the noise a function of student behavior, or adult redirection? Are the students appropriately placed in this setting. What level of support are the EAs providing? Are students working in small groups, or are the EAs babysitting them in their own space? Based on my observations, I would meet with the classroom teacher to determine her concerns. If there were issues I could address, I would start with those. However, I feel compelled to suggest a meeting with the case manager of these students. Clearly, whether the placement is appropriate, there is not an appropriate level of support or training. I would work with the teachers as a team to come to a solution that was best for ALL students.
              ----

              The first thing that I would do would be to bring the teacher into my office and ask her for her suggestions. After being in the classroom with her students, she would probably have an idea of what is and is not working. Furthermore, I would want this teacher to know that I care about her concerns and am here to help and support her. After hearing from her, I would want to try to work with her on the things that we can control. I would not act as a "know-it-all" here because special education is not necessarily my strength. If our District has a special education director, I would be sure to ask her/him for help, suggestions, and resources.

              If I have control over the scheduling of all students, I would hope that I would make sure that there were no classes in this situation. If it happened inadvertently, I would be happy that the teacher came to me with her concerns. It would definitely be something that I would want to address immediately to make sure that we provided the best possible environment for the teacher, the students with autism, and the students without autism. Again, I would want to make sure the teacher knew that she is supported and that I will work with her and for her to make sure that her classroom has an environment that is conducive to learning.
              ---

              I would first speak with the special education chair person and ask him/her to observe the classroom and offer support. I would encourage the teacher to speak with the three support people and discuss her/his expectations for when providing instructions to the students. I would also encourage the teacher to provide a visual of the instructions that she/he gives so that the students can follow the directions that way as well. It would also be necessary to review the expectations with all students when others are talking, this expectation should be followed up with consequences for what happens if they are talking while another student is talking. I would encourage setting up groups so that he/she could work with small groups of students and offer support as needed. The bottom line is that the teacher will need to employ strategies a bit different than she would for other classes because the class has a different dynamic. I would encourage him/her to try multiple methods until there was one that worked best for the class and him/her.

              Ken

              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "blamirecyn" <blamirecyn@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have a class composed of eighteen first graders plus 8 autistic students combined. The autistic students come with three adult aides. It gets so very noisy that no one can hear me when I'm giving the class directions for an assignment. Students ask questions and I can barely hear them. A lot of them aren't following directions because they're distracted. I am stretched very thin. I cannot give any of them the attention they deserve. All of my classroom management skills aren't enough to hold their attention.
              >
              > I have never been asked for my input in this matter and although I've asked for help or guidance in making this work, I've gotten no help.
              >
              > Does anyone have any lesson plans that might work for a group like this? Any classroom management suggestions?
              >
              > Thank you.
              >
              > Feeling Frustrated
              >
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