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PICASSO'S GUERNICA and Sketchbooks

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  • boots13@aol.com
    Does anyone have a kid friendly explanation to the Guernica with Questions for 9th and 10th graders? Also, I am trying to encourage more sketchbook work and
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 2, 2011
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      Does anyone have a kid friendly explanation to the Guernica with Questions for 9th and 10th graders?
      Also, I am trying to encourage more sketchbook work and the importance it plays in the life of a real artist,  I am starting a new project tomorrow in their sketchbooks where they must choose a theme and do a warm up sketch everyday based on that theme...
      I am also going to try and do a side project with them while they work on these mini-sketches. I would like to find more information on how the masters used sketchbooks in the different time periods, renaissance period etc. Any suggestions?
       
      Thanks!
      Terri NYC
    • Jeff Pridie
      Best way to describe Picasso s Guernica is that it is political statement against war. A way to memorialize Guernica and make a visual statement and awaken
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 2, 2011
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        Best way to describe Picasso's Guernica is that it is political statement against war.  A way to memorialize Guernica and make a visual statement and awaken the viewers conscience.  You can relate it to the antiwar posters of Vietnam and even the Gulf War.

        Look at sketchbooks of Leonardo, VanGogh, Audubon, and this site:


        This might help

        Jeff



         

        Does anyone have a kid friendly explanation to the Guernica with Questions for 9th and 10th graders?
        Also, I am trying to encourage more sketchbook work and the importance it plays in the life of a real artist,  I am starting a new project tomorrow in their sketchbooks where they must choose a theme and do a warm up sketch everyday based on that theme...
        I am also going to try and do a side project with them while they work on these mini-sketches. I would like to find more information on how the masters used sketchbooks in the different time periods, renaissance period etc. Any suggestions?
         
        Thanks!
        Terri NYC

      • Brandy
        I think one of the ways to increase the importance of sketching is to show them lots of examples. Obviously DiVinci, but Frida Kahlo has a printed sketch book
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 3, 2011
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          I think one of the ways to increase the importance of sketching is to show them lots of examples. Obviously DiVinci, but Frida Kahlo has a printed sketch book that is really cool. Show them yours :), or create one to show them if your too mature or personal.
          I get my kids to keep all their drawing, from their English, math, science, whatever subject notes. I swear some of my best doodles were on the edges of notes in colleges. Get them to tear or cut them out and collage them to a page in the sketchpad. I was once accused of convincing the kids to not pay attention by another teacher, but I think I just recognize that people doodle everywhere they are, on the phone, in a meeting. Besides, sketch books can be intimidating. When you start thinking of them as a bookshelf for your ideas and not a "binder of greatness", it will get easier.
          Good luck,
          Brandy

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, boots13@... wrote:
          >
          > Does anyone have a kid friendly explanation to the Guernica with Questions
          > for 9th and 10th graders?
          > Also, I am trying to encourage more sketchbook work and the importance it
          > plays in the life of a real artist, I am starting a new project tomorrow
          > in their sketchbooks where they must choose a theme and do a warm up sketch
          > everyday based on that theme...
          > I am also going to try and do a side project with them while they work on
          > these mini-sketches. I would like to find more information on how the
          > masters used sketchbooks in the different time periods, renaissance period etc.
          > Any suggestions?
          >
          > Thanks!
          > Terri NYC
          >
        • Mr. Wick
          Hello Terri,Last year the lesson I taught on Guernica was one of the most powerful and best lessons of the year. I taught the lesson to my 8th grade art
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 3, 2011
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            Hello Terri,
            
            Last year the lesson I taught on Guernica was one of the most powerful and best lessons of the year.  I taught the lesson to my 8th grade art class during the 4th quarter and it was by far the one lesson that I received the most follow up questions from my students.
            
            I began by blowing up the Guernica image and cutting it into sections.  These sections were shuffled and then distributed to the students.  Next they were asked to look at the section they received and to give me their evaluation of the work.  1. what did they believe it was a picture of? 2. What type of art was it?  3. Their reaction to what they held in their hand.
            
            After I collected their responses, we discussed their thoughts and ideas. Then, I showed the class the complete picture (assembled) and asked them to answer the same questions they had initially been asked.
            
            Many students had a negative view of the painting and thought it had no meaning or was not relevant. Then I asked them to be prepared to listen to a story about what the painting was actually about.
            
            I put on some background music and lowered the lights while projecting the Guernica image.  Then I read from eyewitness reports about the actual Guernica event.. I reminded them that what I was about to read was true and actually took place.  
            
            The Red cross has some amazing pdf files and the one I read from can be found here:
            
            http://tinyurl.com/2we4o8r
            and
            http://tinyurl.com/33387nx
            
            
            The room was silent when I finished reading and I asked the students to share their thoughts and feelings in an open dialogue.
            
            
            The red cross also has a lesson plan that you can adapt and this can be found here:
            
            http://tinyurl.com/38wclw3
            
            I then asked the students to answer the same questions that they had answered previously to see if their opinions of the piece had changed.  (almost all had) this led to a great discussion of art appreciation and finding out more about the paintings before jumping to conclusions.
            
            I then asked students to write me a 1 page essay about their reaction to the painting and their experience with it in my class.
            
            It was very rewarding and I think its something that your students will gain a lot of appreciation for.
            
            Let me know if you have any questions.
            
            -JW





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          • Anna
            Showing them your own is an excellent idea, and also to encourage no boundaries on the page, use a range of materials and stick found objects and images in. My
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 4, 2011
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              Showing them your own is an excellent idea, and also to encourage no boundaries on the page, use a range of materials and stick found objects and images in. My sketch books would be so thick, you could hardly close them! Also, giving a theme to a sketch book sometimes helps in breaking down the scary factor, once I made a 'blue' sketchbook where I only used blue pencils, paints, pastels etc and I knitted a blue square and stuck it in; a 'portrait' sketchbook, I drew eyes and noses and faces. sketchbooks can be so exciting. Good luck and let us know how you get on
              Anna
              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Brandy" <bergiemoore@...> wrote:
              >
              > I think one of the ways to increase the importance of sketching is to show them lots of examples. Obviously DiVinci, but Frida Kahlo has a printed sketch book that is really cool. Show them yours :), or create one to show them if your too mature or personal.
              > I get my kids to keep all their drawing, from their English, math, science, whatever subject notes. I swear some of my best doodles were on the edges of notes in colleges. Get them to tear or cut them out and collage them to a page in the sketchpad. I was once accused of convincing the kids to not pay attention by another teacher, but I think I just recognize that people doodle everywhere they are, on the phone, in a meeting. Besides, sketch books can be intimidating. When you start thinking of them as a bookshelf for your ideas and not a "binder of greatness", it will get easier.
              > Good luck,
              > Brandy
              >
              > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, boots13@ wrote:
              > >
              > > Does anyone have a kid friendly explanation to the Guernica with Questions
              > > for 9th and 10th graders?
              > > Also, I am trying to encourage more sketchbook work and the importance it
              > > plays in the life of a real artist, I am starting a new project tomorrow
              > > in their sketchbooks where they must choose a theme and do a warm up sketch
              > > everyday based on that theme...
              > > I am also going to try and do a side project with them while they work on
              > > these mini-sketches. I would like to find more information on how the
              > > masters used sketchbooks in the different time periods, renaissance period etc.
              > > Any suggestions?
              > >
              > > Thanks!
              > > Terri NYC
              > >
              >
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