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Re: [art_education] Re: 28 Kindergarteners!

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  • Kathleen Maledon
    I used centers, too...but centers for the project - 26 kids. Plan: at assigned seats, give back folders, explain/instruct, do, clean-up, story on rug. I
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 7, 2010
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      I used centers, too...but centers for the project - 26 kids.  Plan: at assigned seats, give back folders, explain/instruct,
      do, clean-up, story on rug.  I would be at the center (table)  that needed most help.  I.E. snowflakes: all fold paper
      into 6ths (6 center tables) different snowflakes: print w brayer, print w stamp pads, and sponge paint over
      stencils.  I'm at the stencils.  There are different colors/shapes/designs at other centers so kids can move around.
      I call kids (4 @ time) 2 to watch and learn, 2 to do.  I liked the idea of kids choosing, learning new skills, and being
      in charge.  Because there was so much to do, kids were eager to cooperate.  i used this format whenever I could make
      it work.  Clean-up time was at their own tables - if you were there or not.  The story at the end allowed for late teachers,
      dawdling students, and the art in the stories or the stories themselves were inspiring.  I did have a time-out chair.
      Some kids came from a really bad day and just continued it.  No one wanted to lose their work time. k
      On Nov 7, 2010, at 10:56 AM, pent19 wrote:

      Our group of K's grew this year too, I had 18 in each 4 classes last year-what a dream-gather them around 2-3 large tables pushed together and I could keep an eye on all of them. We lost a K class and are at 23 this year. Not quite 28 (god bless you!) but a big change in projects and mangement techinques. I bought a couple packs of anti-fatigue mats this summer to use as my 'rug' I do lots of demos with them sitting on the floor an watching. We do a good (smiley face) example of what to do with glue, scissors, paint, coloring, etc. and and bad (sad face) example of what not to do. We still do lots of cutting and gluing and tracing so I try to keep my tables as close as I can so i can reach problems as soon as possible. I also put my 'advanced" kids on the out skirts (figure i won't have to redirect them much, and my lower students at one table so i can help them with their skill building. I would start with the basics-how to trace, cut and glue ( i have done coloring shapes-cutting-gluing-always my first project to determine levels), primary pumpkin patches (mix primaries to get secondaries and make a landscape-trace pumpkins and cut), and we just did an indian corn project, next up is symmetrical masks where we focus on patterns and symmetry. My instruction is very explicit, step and step and teaching them the correct way to use materials vs. project creation. Once I have taught them the basics and they are 'getting it' the lessons become much easier despite the numbers. The great things about k's is they are sponges and everything you say is gospel. I would teach them art all day if i could. However the first few months are always the roughest. Stick with it. 
      Check out my artsonia page and some past projects i have done with k's
      http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=5209 
      i have only been here for three years so anything older than that is the previous teachers projects, If you want more info on projects just email me
      Michele NY



    • MaryAnn
      Beautifully organized Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: Kathleen Maledon Sender: art_education@yahoogroups.com Date: Sun, 7
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 7, 2010
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        Beautifully organized

        Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


        From: Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...>
        Sender: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2010 12:25:35 -0700
        To: <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
        ReplyTo: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: 28 Kindergarteners!

         

        I used centers, too...but centers for the project - 26 kids.  Plan: at assigned seats, give back folders, explain/instruct,

        do, clean-up, story on rug.  I would be at the center (table)  that needed most help.  I.E. snowflakes: all fold paper
        into 6ths (6 center tables) different snowflakes: print w brayer, print w stamp pads, and sponge paint over
        stencils.  I'm at the stencils.  There are different colors/shapes/designs at other centers so kids can move around.
        I call kids (4 @ time) 2 to watch and learn, 2 to do.  I liked the idea of kids choosing, learning new skills, and being
        in charge.  Because there was so much to do, kids were eager to cooperate.  i used this format whenever I could make
        it work.  Clean-up time was at their own tables - if you were there or not.  The story at the end allowed for late teachers,
        dawdling students, and the art in the stories or the stories themselves were inspiring.  I did have a time-out chair.
        Some kids came from a really bad day and just continued it.  No one wanted to lose their work time. k
        On Nov 7, 2010, at 10:56 AM, pent19 wrote:

        Our group of K's grew this year too, I had 18 in each 4 classes last year-what a dream-gather them around 2-3 large tables pushed together and I could keep an eye on all of them. We lost a K class and are at 23 this year. Not quite 28 (god bless you!) but a big change in projects and mangement techinques. I bought a couple packs of anti-fatigue mats this summer to use as my 'rug' I do lots of demos with them sitting on the floor an watching. We do a good (smiley face) example of what to do with glue, scissors, paint, coloring, etc. and and bad (sad face) example of what not to do. We still do lots of cutting and gluing and tracing so I try to keep my tables as close as I can so i can reach problems as soon as possible. I also put my 'advanced" kids on the out skirts (figure i won't have to redirect them much, and my lower students at one table so i can help them with their skill building. I would start with the basics-how to trace, cut and glue ( i have done coloring shapes-cutting-gluing-always my first project to determine levels), primary pumpkin patches (mix primaries to get secondaries and make a landscape-trace pumpkins and cut), and we just did an indian corn project, next up is symmetrical masks where we focus on patterns and symmetry. My instruction is very explicit, step and step and teaching them the correct way to use materials vs. project creation. Once I have taught them the basics and they are 'getting it' the lessons become much easier despite the numbers. The great things about k's is they are sponges and everything you say is gospel. I would teach them art all day if i could. However the first few months are always the roughest. Stick with it. 
        Check out my artsonia page and some past projects i have done with k's
        http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=5209 
        i have only been here for three years so anything older than that is the previous teachers projects, If you want more info on projects just email me
        Michele NY



      • Lenny Sanz
        You just gave me an idea of how to do paper marbling with my middle-schoolers! thanks! donna
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 7, 2010
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          You just gave me an idea of how to do paper marbling
          with my middle-schoolers! thanks!

          donna


          On Nov 6, 2010, at 6:50 PM, reens@... wrote:

          > I did square one hand prints with grade K and I had a simple lesson (I
          > think it was cutting out basic shapes, glueing them down(glue sticks)
          > and
          > turning them into something else) for the kids to do while I worked
          > with
          > 3-4 at a time at a seperate table doing their hands (one at a time) in
          > paint pictures. They had to put on a paint shirt, I had their names
          > already on the paper. I had a bucket of soapy water right there and
          > lots
          > of paper towels, as soon as one was done with the paint on their hands
          > they washed up, took off the paint shirt and went back to their seat.
          > I
          > applied the paint to the next one's hands, while keeping one eye on
          > the
          > one washing thier hands, one eye on the one with paint hands and one
          > eye
          > on the rest of the class. Oh wait a minute- that's 3 eyes! Oh well!
          >
          > > Hello All,
          > >
          > > I'm looking for advice on how to corral 28 kinders (a class of 20
          > with 8
          > > and counting special ed kids who come with some aides). The lessons
          > > themselves seem to be on target, but with so many I can't seem to
          > check
          > > with everyone and keep them all on track, keep to the clean up
          > routine and
          > > transition them w/o turning into a crazed loony who is dreaming of
          > happy
          > > hour. My other 5 K classes are going fine. Last year I switched to
          > > centers with this large group with some success; but this group has
          > 3/4s
          > > starting from square 1 with very little exposure to art materials.
          > I know
          > > many of you have large classes. Tips and advice are greatly
          > appreciated!
          > >
          > > Ali k-4
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
        • aliteachesart
          Thanks for all the feedback. ALi
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 8, 2010
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            Thanks for all the feedback. ALi

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, MaryAnn Kohl <maryann@...> wrote:
            >
            > Break into centers. Everyone goes to different learning centers, while you
            > work with one small group. Then call a second small group to be with you,
            > and eventually, all the kids work with you in small groups, and the rest go
            > through the learning centers.
            > ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
            > MaryAnn
            >
            >
            >
            > On Fri, Nov 5, 2010 at 9:16 AM, aliteachesart <abenton@...>wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > Hello All,
            > >
            > > I'm looking for advice on how to corral 28 kinders (a class of 20 with 8
            > > and counting special ed kids who come with some aides). The lessons
            > > themselves seem to be on target, but with so many I can't seem to check with
            > > everyone and keep them all on track, keep to the clean up routine and
            > > transition them w/o turning into a crazed loony who is dreaming of happy
            > > hour. My other 5 K classes are going fine. Last year I switched to centers
            > > with this large group with some success; but this group has 3/4s starting
            > > from square 1 with very little exposure to art materials. I know many of you
            > > have large classes. Tips and advice are greatly appreciated!
            > >
            > > Ali k-4
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
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