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Teaching portrait drawing

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  • Greg Hogan
    I start out on paper.  I break down each part of the portrait.  First we study the eyes and various shapes of eyes, then move on to noses, ears etc.... I
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 2, 2010
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      I start out on paper.  I break down each part of the portrait.  First we study the eyes and various shapes of eyes, then move on to noses, ears etc.... I then use a grid to help them with proportions.  Before they start adding the features I discuss the grid and break down the thirds rule.  I found that if you try to discuss the whole portrait at once it becomes overwhelming for students.  When they study the individual parts they seem to have more of an understanding when they start putting them together.
      Hope this helps.
      GHogan
    • llburoker
      Thank you, Greg. Lois
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 2, 2010
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        Thank you, Greg.
        Lois

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Greg Hogan <gshogan@...> wrote:
        >
        > I start out on paper.  I break down each part of the portrait.  First we study
        > the eyes and various shapes of eyes, then move on to noses, ears etc.... I then
        > use a grid to help them with proportions.  Before they start adding the features
        > I discuss the grid and break down the thirds rule.  I found that if you try to
        > discuss the whole portrait at once it becomes overwhelming for students.  When
        > they study the individual parts they seem to have more of an understanding when
        > they start putting them together.
        > Hope this helps.
        > GHogan
        >
      • Kathleen Maledon
        I also spend a period talking about relative measurements. We use mirrors, other people, ditto sheets, etc. The kids are really surprised that as unalike as
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 2, 2010
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          I also spend a period talking about relative measurements.  We use mirrors, other people,
          ditto sheets, etc.  The kids are really surprised that as unalike as we are, we are so predictably
          alike.  It's a fun assignment.  We do the whole body on that, too.  Measuring, comparing and
          really getting into da vinci.  k
          On Nov 2, 2010, at 6:08 AM, Greg Hogan wrote:


          I start out on paper.  I break down each part of the portrait.  First we study the eyes and various shapes of eyes, then move on to noses, ears etc.... I then use a grid to help them with proportions.  Before they start adding the features I discuss the grid and break down the thirds rule.  I found that if you try to discuss the whole portrait at once it becomes overwhelming for students.  When they study the individual parts they seem to have more of an understanding when they start putting them together.
          Hope this helps.
          GHogan


        • llburoker
          Thanks Kathleen, Lois
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 3, 2010
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            Thanks Kathleen,
            Lois

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
            >
            > I also spend a period talking about relative measurements. We use
            > mirrors, other people,
            > ditto sheets, etc. The kids are really surprised that as unalike as
            > we are, we are so predictably
            > alike. It's a fun assignment. We do the whole body on that, too.
            > Measuring, comparing and
            > really getting into da vinci. k
            > On Nov 2, 2010, at 6:08 AM, Greg Hogan wrote:
            >
            > >
            > > I start out on paper. I break down each part of the portrait.
            > > First we study the eyes and various shapes of eyes, then move on to
            > > noses, ears etc.... I then use a grid to help them with
            > > proportions. Before they start adding the features I discuss the
            > > grid and break down the thirds rule. I found that if you try to
            > > discuss the whole portrait at once it becomes overwhelming for
            > > students. When they study the individual parts they seem to have
            > > more of an understanding when they start putting them together.
            > > Hope this helps.
            > > GHogan
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Brandy
            http://members.cox.net/bergiemoore/face.html Here s a generic version of a step by step process. I found it invaluable to have a copy of a head with the lines
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 3, 2010
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              http://members.cox.net/bergiemoore/face.html
              Here's a generic version of a step by step process.
              I found it invaluable to have a copy of a head with the lines all drawn out the first time and then we added the features one by one. Then we had just an outline of a head, and they drew where the lines would be, twice. Once with me, step by step, and once by themselves so I could see where they needed help. Then we moved onto then drawing the head and features by themselves.
              (I think the nose is too low in the drawing, but not unrealistically so. I actually found it very difficult to do the drawing, take a picture, add the next step, take a picture. And unfortunately, I can't update the page becasue I no longer have a cox account. Good news to me- they didn't canceled my old pages :) So here it is.
              Brandy

              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
              >
              > I also spend a period talking about relative measurements. We use
              > mirrors, other people,
              > ditto sheets, etc. The kids are really surprised that as unalike as
              > we are, we are so predictably
              > alike. It's a fun assignment. We do the whole body on that, too.
              > Measuring, comparing and
              > really getting into da vinci. k
              > On Nov 2, 2010, at 6:08 AM, Greg Hogan wrote:
              >
              > >
              > > I start out on paper. I break down each part of the portrait.
              > > First we study the eyes and various shapes of eyes, then move on to
              > > noses, ears etc.... I then use a grid to help them with
              > > proportions. Before they start adding the features I discuss the
              > > grid and break down the thirds rule. I found that if you try to
              > > discuss the whole portrait at once it becomes overwhelming for
              > > students. When they study the individual parts they seem to have
              > > more of an understanding when they start putting them together.
              > > Hope this helps.
              > > GHogan
              > >
              > >
              >
            • llburoker
              Thank you, very nice, tutorial. Lois
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 3, 2010
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                Thank you, very nice, tutorial.
                Lois

                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Brandy" <bergiemoore@...> wrote:
                >
                > http://members.cox.net/bergiemoore/face.html
                > Here's a generic version of a step by step process.
                > I found it invaluable to have a copy of a head with the lines all drawn out the first time and then we added the features one by one. Then we had just an outline of a head, and they drew where the lines would be, twice. Once with me, step by step, and once by themselves so I could see where they needed help. Then we moved onto then drawing the head and features by themselves.
                > (I think the nose is too low in the drawing, but not unrealistically so. I actually found it very difficult to do the drawing, take a picture, add the next step, take a picture. And unfortunately, I can't update the page becasue I no longer have a cox account. Good news to me- they didn't canceled my old pages :) So here it is.
                > Brandy
                >
                > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I also spend a period talking about relative measurements. We use
                > > mirrors, other people,
                > > ditto sheets, etc. The kids are really surprised that as unalike as
                > > we are, we are so predictably
                > > alike. It's a fun assignment. We do the whole body on that, too.
                > > Measuring, comparing and
                > > really getting into da vinci. k
                > > On Nov 2, 2010, at 6:08 AM, Greg Hogan wrote:
                > >
                > > >
                > > > I start out on paper. I break down each part of the portrait.
                > > > First we study the eyes and various shapes of eyes, then move on to
                > > > noses, ears etc.... I then use a grid to help them with
                > > > proportions. Before they start adding the features I discuss the
                > > > grid and break down the thirds rule. I found that if you try to
                > > > discuss the whole portrait at once it becomes overwhelming for
                > > > students. When they study the individual parts they seem to have
                > > > more of an understanding when they start putting them together.
                > > > Hope this helps.
                > > > GHogan
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
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