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Re: lesson plans for alternative high school

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  • dianekoch1967
    His Tara I understand your situation. I teach many of the same students you do except I have them earlier on K-8. We are inner city at risk kids whoes
    Message 1 of 17 , Oct 18, 2010
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      His Tara I understand your situation. I teach many of the same students you do except I have them earlier on K-8. We are inner city at risk kids whoes families are in gangs, doing drugs, homeless etc. Many do end up in alternative high schools later on. In the past couple of years I have found a lot of success doing stained glass with the middle school students. At first many collegues thought I was insane to give soldering irons to these kids that will use most opportunities to destroy instead of create. I believe me showing students I believe in their ability to be responsible and giving them something that they never would experience in their lives has made an impact. In the past I would "dumb down" a lesson because of their lack of skills, self control and long term interests. The lesson I do is pretty simple and the end produce nice so they have a sense of accomplishment and value for their art. If you would likeme to go into more detail let me know.

      I have also found more success with 3-D than 2- D art because they feel like it is "more advanced" even if it is something younger students could do. I have no kiln but occasionally do use air dry clay with acrylic paint instead of glaze. I only have one small sink and there is no way 30 + students could clean up so I have found that a bucket of soapy water with rags in it workd well for clean up. Also Papier mache over a wire armature is a long term project that they are able to feel success with the end product. Mask making is a highly anticipated project I do using plastic face forms with plaster gauze. I then have students embelish the features with celluclay. Sometimes transforming the human face into an animal face or animal human hybrid.
      I have found their frustration level with paint to be very high (they do not want to take their time to learn how to be successful) but I do have them plan and paint an abstract representation of mood or emotion. They only use line shape and color (nothing recognizible) and that takes the pressure off of it looking "like something". I have them write or explain the mood or emotion they are painting and why they made the color and line choices to represent that mood.
      If you want more details on any of these I'd be happy to send them to you. Good luck I know where you are comming from and you have to believe if you can show the students some success and a sense of accomplishment in what they do you will be making a positive impact on their growth as people.

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, tara <dreamsinoil@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > I began working in an alternative hs. My population is at risk youth, they have disabilities ranging from ED to BD to LD. This is not really an elective they get to choose, and quite frankly when I taught fifth grade their drawing skills were better then most of these students. It is difficult to get them to actually take their time and sit down and draw out anything so traditional art lessons really dont work. I cannot allow them to use any printmaking materials or anything too sharp. We have no sink in the classroom and no kiln. I am really looking for suggestions. I find craft based art lessons work best as anything to difficult they tend to shut down. I do have plaster but no carving tools. I thought perhaps of doing sand casting.
      > thanks
      > Tara
      > =
      >
    • artgirlinthewest
      Thank you so much, I am moved and inspired by this information.
      Message 2 of 17 , Oct 19, 2010
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        Thank you so much, I am moved and inspired by this information.

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "dianekoch1967" <dikoch@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > His Tara I understand your situation. I teach many of the same students you do except I have them earlier on K-8. We are inner city at risk kids whoes families are in gangs, doing drugs, homeless etc. Many do end up in alternative high schools later on. In the past couple of years I have found a lot of success doing stained glass with the middle school students. At first many collegues thought I was insane to give soldering irons to these kids that will use most opportunities to destroy instead of create. I believe me showing students I believe in their ability to be responsible and giving them something that they never would experience in their lives has made an impact. In the past I would "dumb down" a lesson because of their lack of skills, self control and long term interests. The lesson I do is pretty simple and the end produce nice so they have a sense of accomplishment and value for their art. If you would likeme to go into more detail let me know.
        >
        > I have also found more success with 3-D than 2- D art because they feel like it is "more advanced" even if it is something younger students could do. I have no kiln but occasionally do use air dry clay with acrylic paint instead of glaze. I only have one small sink and there is no way 30 + students could clean up so I have found that a bucket of soapy water with rags in it workd well for clean up. Also Papier mache over a wire armature is a long term project that they are able to feel success with the end product. Mask making is a highly anticipated project I do using plastic face forms with plaster gauze. I then have students embelish the features with celluclay. Sometimes transforming the human face into an animal face or animal human hybrid.
        > I have found their frustration level with paint to be very high (they do not want to take their time to learn how to be successful) but I do have them plan and paint an abstract representation of mood or emotion. They only use line shape and color (nothing recognizible) and that takes the pressure off of it looking "like something". I have them write or explain the mood or emotion they are painting and why they made the color and line choices to represent that mood.
        > If you want more details on any of these I'd be happy to send them to you. Good luck I know where you are comming from and you have to believe if you can show the students some success and a sense of accomplishment in what they do you will be making a positive impact on their growth as people.
        >
        > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, tara <dreamsinoil@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi,
        > >
        > > I began working in an alternative hs. My population is at risk youth, they have disabilities ranging from ED to BD to LD. This is not really an elective they get to choose, and quite frankly when I taught fifth grade their drawing skills were better then most of these students. It is difficult to get them to actually take their time and sit down and draw out anything so traditional art lessons really dont work. I cannot allow them to use any printmaking materials or anything too sharp. We have no sink in the classroom and no kiln. I am really looking for suggestions. I find craft based art lessons work best as anything to difficult they tend to shut down. I do have plaster but no carving tools. I thought perhaps of doing sand casting.
        > > thanks
        > > Tara
        > > =
        > >
        >
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