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Re: [art_education] Re:clay and grading

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  • Varney-Parker, Diane
    Clay will definitely ³blow up² if there¹s still moisture present. Projects should be ³bone dry² before being put in a kiln. The kiln also needs to be on
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 6, 2010
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      Re: [art_education] Re:clay and grading Clay will definitely “blow up” if there’s still moisture present.  Projects should be “bone dry” before being put in a kiln.  The kiln also needs to be on the proper setting.  If it heats up too quickly pieces can “blow up”. So it should be on a low setting.  Finally clay that is too thick or has air pockets is also prone to “blowing up” in the kiln.  At our school we have had several explosions even with plenty of drying time (3 days to a week even).  We have since switched to Laguna white clay and have had no problems.  

      -Diane


      On 10/5/10 9:48 PM, "Gayle Parent" <gayleparent@...> wrote:


       
       
         

      In recent years I have heard from several sources that most projects that "blow up" in the kiln do so because there is moisture still in the clay, more than due to air bubbles.  Anyone agree or disagree?  I have several years of experience with clay, but I'm not a clay specialist.  Could we hear from some high school ceramics teachers?
      Gayle
       
         



    • pent19
      I have to agree, a child would have to be working pretty thick and lack technical skills to create an air bubble (i teach my students about wedging and working
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 6, 2010
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        I have to agree, a child would have to be working pretty thick and lack technical skills to create an air bubble (i teach my students about wedging and working thin to prevent this.) and that most blowups are due to rushing them to the bisque fire and not letting them dry thoroughly. you can tell how dry a piece is 1-its not the same color, dark grey and light grey areas. 2-wet clay is colder than dry clay. I encourage my students to work thin-to conserve clay and reduce blowups, i may have one or two pieces a year that this happens to(not bad for 475 students!)
        hope this helps!
        michele

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Gayle Parent <gayleparent@...> wrote:
        >
        > In recent years I have heard from several sources that most projects that "blow up" in the kiln do so because there is moisture still in the clay, more than due to air bubbles. Anyone agree or disagree? I have several years of experience with clay, but I'm not a clay specialist. Could we hear from some high school ceramics teachers?
        > Gayle
        >
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