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Currier and Ives - PRINTMAKING

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  • Judy Decker
    Greetings MaryAnn, Any chance the main focus could be printmaking? Currier and Ives was a printmaking firm. While I don t recommend WikiPedia for research,
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 6, 2010
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      Greetings MaryAnn,

      Any chance the main focus could be printmaking?

      Currier and Ives was a printmaking firm. While I don't recommend
      WikiPedia for research, this article looks pretty good:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currier_and_Ives

      Currier and Ives didn't do the actual painting - this was a
      printmaking firm with hired artists (to my knowledge).

      Having the children do lithography (using litho-sketch) is probably
      out of the question. Any chance they could do scratch foam prints and
      hand color those? They wouldn't be able to use water colors as water
      based inks wouldn't hold up, but maybe colored pencils?

      Another option - What about black pen/fine point marker drawings?
      Photocopy those onto better quality paper (that what is customarily
      used in the photo copy machine) and they could hand color those.

      How would these be mass produced today? Using modern technology. Scan
      and digitally reproduce.

      As far as theme? What kind of scenes are important to THEM (the
      students)? Currier and Ives were keen on what would be appealing to
      the people of THAT time period. I have never, never been an advocate
      for "in the style of" lessons - and never will.

      Sorry I did not post this sooner, but I have been VERY busy myself.
      Besides, I have been out of the classroom for 10 years and my mind is
      a bit fuzzy, too (chuckles).

      Feel free to use this information any way you wish.

      Judy Decker
    • Lauren Perlman
      MaryAnn, it s always nice to read about what you are up to:-)   A nice project for printmaking:   Styrofoam plates pencils scrap paper for sketching colored
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 6, 2010
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        MaryAnn, it's always nice to read about what you are up to:-)
         
        A nice project for printmaking:
         
        Styrofoam plates
        pencils
        scrap paper for sketching
        colored ink
        brayers
        extra paper for printing
         
        Have the students discuss themes for their works and sketch them on a scrap paper.  It is always good to plan out the artwork beforehand.  Then, they can create their sketch on the plate, scraping the design in with their pencil.  It is important to use the BOTTOM of the plate. So, they turn their plate over so that the bottom is facing up.
         
        They can then roll their brayers in a particular paint, roll it on their sketch, press another paper on top and, voila! a print.  Of course, you could talk to them about what a print is and how the computer printer today does the same thing....they can print multiple prints of their image by simply pressing another paper on top of it and repeating the steps above.
         
        I would discuss with them what would happen if they include numbers and letters.....and how they could include more than one color.....what happens regarding time......
         
        GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
        -L


        Lauren R. Perlman, M.S. Ed
        Founder/Director, Mummies and Masterpieces

        (847) 673-7370
        (847) 220-0325
        Alternate email lauren@...
          
         
        NOW BOOKING ALL PROGRAMS FOR SECULAR AND RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS
        .....and now available...our Fall After School and Enrichment Flyer!
         
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        --- On Wed, 10/6/10, Judy Decker <jdecker4art@...> wrote:

        From: Judy Decker <jdecker4art@...>
        Subject: [art_education] Currier and Ives - PRINTMAKING
        To: "Art Education" <art_education@yahoogroups.com>, "ArtsEducators" <ArtsEducators@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2010, 11:20 AM

         
        Greetings MaryAnn,

        Any chance the main focus could be printmaking?

        Currier and Ives was a printmaking firm. While I don't recommend
        WikiPedia for research, this article looks pretty good:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currier_and_Ives

        Currier and Ives didn't do the actual painting - this was a
        printmaking firm with hired artists (to my knowledge).

        Having the children do lithography (using litho-sketch) is probably
        out of the question. Any chance they could do scratch foam prints and
        hand color those? They wouldn't be able to use water colors as water
        based inks wouldn't hold up, but maybe colored pencils?

        Another option - What about black pen/fine point marker drawings?
        Photocopy those onto better quality paper (that what is customarily
        used in the photo copy machine) and they could hand color those.

        How would these be mass produced today? Using modern technology. Scan
        and digitally reproduce.

        As far as theme? What kind of scenes are important to THEM (the
        students)? Currier and Ives were keen on what would be appealing to
        the people of THAT time period. I have never, never been an advocate
        for "in the style of" lessons - and never will.

        Sorry I did not post this sooner, but I have been VERY busy myself.
        Besides, I have been out of the classroom for 10 years and my mind is
        a bit fuzzy, too (chuckles).

        Feel free to use this information any way you wish.

        Judy Decker

      • MARYANN KOHL
        Perfect -- printmaking is a great addition to the ideas I m presenting!! This is exactly what these volunteer inexperienced moms can handle, and the kids will
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 6, 2010
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          Perfect -- printmaking is a great addition to the ideas I'm presenting!! 
          This is exactly what these volunteer inexperienced moms can handle,
          and the kids will love it. 
          Thanks, Lauren and Judy. 
          And also a thank you to Wanda for her calendar idea.

          Problem solved!! :)
          . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  
          MaryAnn  
          . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  
          25th Anniversary 1985 – 2010
          Celebrating 25 Years of Bringing Art to Children

          On Oct 6, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Lauren Perlman wrote:


          MaryAnn, it's always nice to read about what you are up to:-)
           
          A nice project for printmaking:
           
          Styrofoam plates
          pencils
          scrap paper for sketching
          colored ink
          brayers
          extra paper for printing
           
          Have the students discuss themes for their works and sketch them on a scrap paper.  It is always good to plan out the artwork beforehand.  Then, they can create their sketch on the plate, scraping the design in with their pencil.  It is important to use the BOTTOM of the plate. So, they turn their plate over so that the bottom is facing up.
           
          They can then roll their brayers in a particular paint, roll it on their sketch, press another paper on top and, voila! a print.  Of course, you could talk to them about what a print is and how the computer printer today does the same thing....they can print multiple prints of their image by simply pressing another paper on top of it and repeating the steps above.
           
          I would discuss with them what would happen if they include numbers and letters.....and how they could include more than one color.....what happens regarding time......
           
          GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
          -L


          Lauren R. Perlman, M.S. Ed
          Founder/Director 


          Any chance the main focus could be printmaking?

          Currier and Ives was a printmaking firm. While I don't recommend
          WikiPedia for research, this article looks pretty good:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currier_and_Ives

          Currier and Ives didn't do the actual painting - this was a
          printmaking firm with hired artists (to my knowledge).

          Having the children do lithography (using litho-sketch) is probably
          out of the question. Any chance they could do scratch foam prints and
          hand color those? They wouldn't be able to use water colors as water
          based inks wouldn't hold up, but maybe colored pencils?

          Another option - What about black pen/fine point marker drawings?
          Photocopy those onto better quality paper (that what is customarily
          used in the photo copy machine) and they could hand color those.

          How would these be mass produced today? Using modern technology. Scan
          and digitally reproduce.

          As far as theme? What kind of scenes are important to THEM (the
          students)? Currier and Ives were keen on what would be appealing to
          the people of THAT time period. I have never, never been an advocate
          for "in the style of" lessons - and never will.

          Sorry I did not post this sooner, but I have been VERY busy myself.
          Besides, I have been out of the classroom for 10 years and my mind is
          a bit fuzzy, too (chuckles).

          Feel free to use this information any way you wish.

          Judy Decker



          I have cut the calendar pictures into 2 or 3 inch squares depending of the
          size of the picture, numbered them for each picture, then mixed them all
          up. I then gave a piece to my students along with a larger piece of
          square paper 4x4 they then drew a grid on the calendar and paper to draw
          the picture  or they could free hand draw, rendering it in colored
          pencils. I have three classes of 8th grade students so some had parts of
          pictures in each class so some couldn't find their matching pieces until
          they finished. To display when they were finished I had them match the
          numbers on a large piece of construction paper taping thier piece in
          it's place. It is fun to see how their pieces match the pieces around it
          or maybe not. LOL After all pictures are completed I take up the
          originals tape them onto another piece of paper so they can see the
          originals in tact.

          __I

          Wanda

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