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Re: [art_education] Advice

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  • crehonic@aol.com
    Maybe start with doing a Social Contract which is a great way to let the kids know your expectations in the classroom as well opening up a dialogue for what
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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      Maybe start with doing a "Social Contract" which is a great way to let the kids know your expectations in the classroom
      as well opening up a dialogue for what their expectations are (each child must sign the contract "poster" and you can refer
      to it as needed all year long)  I was lucky enough to have my district send me to a workshop from the Flippen Group called
      Capturing Kids Hearts.  You may want to look at their website to see if you agree with their approach and philosophy. 

      www.flippengroup.com/education/ckh.html

      Best of Luck

      cindi



      -----Original Message-----
      From: PenelopeL <penny_lee53@...>
      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, Aug 3, 2010 11:49 am
      Subject: [art_education] Advice

       
      I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness.....

      I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids.

      What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructively?

      Thanks so much for your help!

      Penny Lee

    • Kathleen Maledon
      I had to do something similar one semester....I just tallied the compliments and recorded general negative ones per day (i.e. I can t think of
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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        I had to do something similar one semester....I just tallied the compliments and recorded general negative ones per day (i.e. I can't think of anything/slouch...)  the whole thing proved 
        very subjective with no pattern.  At the end of each qtr I gave questionaires:  surprise, surprise - kids like clay, not thrilled with color theory.  the projects were evenly divided by 
        students liking one over another.   I think maybe the best way is to know your students:  keeping a rapport between you and homerm teacher; communication with
        behaviorally-challenged parents, writing a newsletter to stay in communication w parents and stressing an open-door policy.  the concerns I had with a few  parents was that art should
        'be fun' --have no expectations, just unlimited access to materials.  I educated my parents with standards, bulletin boards with learning outcomes posted, newsletter, etc.
        the parents eventually understood that art was a sequenced course with visible outcomes mandated by state.  2 cents worth  k
        On Aug 3, 2010, at 9:49 AM, PenelopeL wrote:

        I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness..... 

        I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids. 

        What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructively? 

        Thanks so much for your help!

        Penny Lee 


      • Diane Gregory
        Great advice Kathleen. Yes, one has to spend time educating both students and parents about a professionally delivered art program that has a sequence and
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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          Great advice Kathleen.  Yes, one has to spend time educating both students and parents about a professionally delivered art program that has a sequence and required content by the state.  It is important to take a positive constructive approach to this issue at the beginning of the school year to avoid getting on the defensive later.  Newsletters, bulletin boards, educational art displays of student works with clear learning objectives, statements from students about what they learned, posting the major standards for art in the classroom, posting vocabulary words and lots of creative works of art by children and adult artists.

          It is like walking a tight rope.  One has to be diplomatic yet clear about the value of a quality art program.

          Giving out a questionnaire is good advice.  It is important to write the questions in a positive way so that you can get valuable constructive feedback.  Then when reviewing the results, one must judge the validity of the comments.  Having a combination of multiple choice and open ended questions can help balance the questionnaire so you can get solid information.

          Another way to do this, is to have students complete a self-evaluation of their own art learning after each unit, project, activity, etc.  In this way the focus is taken off yourself and on student learning.

          You might even consider doing a pre-test at the beginning and a post test at the end, to see what they have learned.

          Sometimes, it is best to side step things so that you get the information you really need so that you avoid getting too many subjective or non-constructive comments.

          I have done this with some of my university level courses, since the teaching evaluation form that students complete do not ask the questions I need to have answers to so that I can improve the class.

          It is also good educational practice and can demonstrate to your supervisor the quality of the job you are doing.

          Hope this helps.

          Diane Gregory
           








           

          I had to do something similar one semester.... I just tallied the compliments and recorded general negative ones per day (i.e. I can't think of anything/slouch. ..)  the whole thing proved 

          very subjective with no pattern.  At the end of each qtr I gave questionaires:  surprise, surprise - kids like clay, not thrilled with color theory.  the projects were evenly divided by 
          students liking one over another.   I think maybe the best way is to know your students:  keeping a rapport between you and homerm teacher; communication with
          behaviorally- challenged parents, writing a newsletter to stay in communication w parents and stressing an open-door policy.  the concerns I had with a few  parents was that art should
          'be fun' --have no expectations, just unlimited access to materials.  I educated my parents with standards, bulletin boards with learning outcomes posted, newsletter, etc.
          the parents eventually understood that art was a sequenced course with visible outcomes mandated by state.  2 cents worth  k
          On Aug 3, 2010, at 9:49 AM, PenelopeL wrote:

          I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness. .... 

          I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids. 

          What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructi vely? 

          Thanks so much for your help!

          Penny Lee 


        • Jeff Pridie
          First of all constructive criticism is built on a constructive assessment tool. I suggest you do an entry assessment and exit assessment. If you are moving
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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            First of all constructive criticism is built on a constructive assessment tool. 
            I suggest you do an entry assessment and exit assessment.

            If you are moving into a new position it is good to find out where students are 
            in their art experience. I always find it is good to mix multiple choice, with 
            short answer questions.

            What kind of art do they like doing? 
            What is their greatest fear in creating art?
            What do they like most about doing art?
            What kind of skill or technique do they hope they walk out of class with?
            How do they best learn: Lecture, Demonstration, Reading, Collaboration, 
            What kind of assessments do they do best with? Fill in the blank, matching, T/F, 
            essay, etc.
            (These are examples of pre-assessments)

            What art did they like doing the most?
            What project gave them the most struggle? Why?
            If they were to suggest new projects what would they be?
            What teaching method did they like most this year? 
            What would you tell another student about this class to make sure they have 
            success?
            Describe the grading process of your projects?
            What assessment tool for the class did you like the most? Why?
            (These are examples of post-assessments)

            Keep the entry and exit assessments simple, focused on what "you" want to know 
            to build a better teaching environment. I do this every year. Yes, it takes a 
            bit of time to review but can make structuring your classes for the next year 
            productive plus administrators eat it up.

            Jeff (Minnesota)

            ________________________________

            I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having 
            resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade 
            for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about 
            finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never 
            did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art 
            teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 
            7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so 
            poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from 
            kids. 

            What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any 
            suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my 
            class(es)constructively? 

            Thanks so much for your help!

            Penny Lee 



             

            I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness.....

            I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids.

            What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructively?

            Thanks so much for your help!

            Penny Lee


          • Diane Gregory
            Great questions Jeff! I have a grad student who wants to do something like this. I will forward your suggestions to her. Thanks, Diane ... having
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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              Great questions Jeff!  I have a grad student who wants to do something like this.  I will forward your suggestions to her.

              Thanks,

              Diane
               

              What kind of art do they like doing? 
              What is their greatest fear in creating art?
              What do they like most about doing art?
              What kind of skill or technique do they hope they walk out of class with?
              How do they best learn: Lecture, Demonstration, Reading, Collaboration, 
              What kind of assessments do they do best with? Fill in the blank, matching, T/F, 
              essay, etc.
              (These are examples of pre-assessments)

              What art did they like doing the most?
              What project gave them the most struggle? Why?
              If they were to suggest new projects what would they be?
              What teaching method did they like most this year? 
              What would you tell another student about this class to make sure they have 
              success?
              Describe the grading process of your projects?
              What assessment tool for the class did you like the most? Why?
              (These are examples of post-assessments)

              Keep the entry and exit assessments simple, focused on what "you" want to know 
              to build a better teaching environment. I do this every year. Yes, it takes a 
              bit of time to review but can make structuring your classes for the next year 
              productive plus administrators eat it up.

              Jeff (Minnesota)

              ____________ _________ _________ __

              I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having 
              resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade 
              for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about 
              finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never 
              did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art 
              teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 
              7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so 
              poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from 
              kids. 

              What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any 
              suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my 
              class(es)constructi vely? 

              Thanks so much for your help!

              Penny Lee 



               

              I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness. ....

              I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids.

              What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructi vely?

              Thanks so much for your help!

              Penny Lee


            • Jeff Pridie
              Diane, These questions can be modified from Elementary all the way up to High School. This is a great way to identify learning styles, level of knowledge,
              Message 6 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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                Diane,

                These questions can be modified from Elementary all the way up to High School.  This is a great way to identify learning styles, level of knowledge, fears, strengths, valued opinions along with zeroing in on strengths and weaknesses in a program.


                jeff (minnesota)



                 

                Great questions Jeff!  I have a grad student who wants to do something like this.  I will forward your suggestions to her.

                Thanks,

                Diane
                 

                What kind of art do they like doing? 
                What is their greatest fear in creating art?
                What do they like most about doing art?
                What kind of skill or technique do they hope they walk out of class with?
                How do they best learn: Lecture, Demonstration, Reading, Collaboration, 
                What kind of assessments do they do best with? Fill in the blank, matching, T/F, 
                essay, etc.
                (These are examples of pre-assessments)

                What art did they like doing the most?
                What project gave them the most struggle? Why?
                If they were to suggest new projects what would they be?
                What teaching method did they like most this year? 
                What would you tell another student about this class to make sure they have 
                success?
                Describe the grading process of your projects?
                What assessment tool for the class did you like the most? Why?
                (These are examples of post-assessments)

                Keep the entry and exit assessments simple, focused on what "you" want to know 
                to build a better teaching environment. I do this every year. Yes, it takes a 
                bit of time to review but can make structuring your classes for the next year 
                productive plus administrators eat it up.

                Jeff (Minnesota)

                ____________ _________ _________ __

                I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having 
                resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade 
                for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about 
                finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never 
                did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art 
                teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 
                7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so 
                poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from 
                kids. 

                What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any 
                suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my 
                class(es)constructi vely? 

                Thanks so much for your help!

                Penny Lee 



                 

                I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness. ....

                I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids.

                What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructi vely?

                Thanks so much for your help!

                Penny Lee



              • Diane Gregory
                Thanks Jeff, My student just finished her first year of teaching art. She is discouraged because she feels that art is not taken seriously. So she is looking
                Message 7 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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                  Thanks Jeff,

                  My student just finished her first year of teaching art.  She is discouraged because she feels that art is not taken seriously.  So she is looking into trying to identify their ideas, opinions, knowledge, experiences so she can relate to them.  She created a survey, but the tone of it was a little defensive and so she is revising it.  The information you provided in your list will help her to strike a good, factual, or objective tone.

                  Thanks so much.

                  Diane
                   





                  Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
                  Henry David Thoreau, Walden


                  Dr. Diane C. Gregory
                  Associate Professor of Art Education
                  Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
                  dgregory@...


                  From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...>
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tue, August 3, 2010 8:28:04 PM
                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                   

                  Diane,

                  These questions can be modified from Elementary all the way up to High School.  This is a great way to identify learning styles, level of knowledge, fears, strengths, valued opinions along with zeroing in on strengths and weaknesses in a program.


                  jeff (minnesota)



                   

                  Great questions Jeff!  I have a grad student who wants to do something like this.  I will forward your suggestions to her.

                  Thanks,

                  Diane
                   

                  What kind of art do they like doing? 
                  What is their greatest fear in creating art?
                  What do they like most about doing art?
                  What kind of skill or technique do they hope they walk out of class with?
                  How do they best learn: Lecture, Demonstration, Reading, Collaboration, 
                  What kind of assessments do they do best with? Fill in the blank, matching, T/F, 
                  essay, etc.
                  (These are examples of pre-assessments)

                  What art did they like doing the most?
                  What project gave them the most struggle? Why?
                  If they were to suggest new projects what would they be?
                  What teaching method did they like most this year? 
                  What would you tell another student about this class to make sure they have 
                  success?
                  Describe the grading process of your projects?
                  What assessment tool for the class did you like the most? Why?
                  (These are examples of post-assessments)

                  Keep the entry and exit assessments simple, focused on what "you" want to know 
                  to build a better teaching environment. I do this every year. Yes, it takes a 
                  bit of time to review but can make structuring your classes for the next year 
                  productive plus administrators eat it up.

                  Jeff (Minnesota)

                  ____________ _________ _________ __

                  I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having 
                  resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade 
                  for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about 
                  finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never 
                  did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art 
                  teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 
                  7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so 
                  poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from 
                  kids. 

                  What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any 
                  suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my 
                  class(es)constructi vely? 

                  Thanks so much for your help!

                  Penny Lee 



                   

                  I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness. ....

                  I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids.

                  What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructi vely?

                  Thanks so much for your help!

                  Penny Lee



                • Penny Lee
                  I know the feeling! Penny Lee To: art_education@yahoogroups.com From: gregory.diane55@yahoo.com Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 19:57:18 -0700 Subject: Re:
                  Message 8 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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                    I know the feeling! 

                    Penny Lee




                    To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                    From: gregory.diane55@...
                    Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 19:57:18 -0700
                    Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                     

                    Thanks Jeff,

                    My student just finished her first year of teaching art.  She is discouraged because she feels that art is not taken seriously.  So she is looking into trying to identify their ideas, opinions, knowledge, experiences so she can relate to them.  She created a survey, but the tone of it was a little defensive and so she is revising it.  The information you provided in your list will help her to strike a good, factual, or objective tone.

                    Thanks so much.

                    Diane
                     





                    Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
                    Henry David Thoreau, Walden


                    Dr. Diane C. Gregory
                    Associate Professor of Art Education
                    Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
                    dgregory@mail. twu.edu


                    From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo. com>
                    To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                    Sent: Tue, August 3, 2010 8:28:04 PM
                    Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                     

                    Diane,

                    These questions can be modified from Elementary all the way up to High School.  This is a great way to identify learning styles, level of knowledge, fears, strengths, valued opinions along with zeroing in on strengths and weaknesses in a program.


                    jeff (minnesota)



                     

                    Great questions Jeff!  I have a grad student who wants to do something like this.  I will forward your suggestions to her.

                    Thanks,

                    Diane
                     

                    What kind of art do they like doing? 
                    What is their greatest fear in creating art?
                    What do they like most about doing art?
                    What kind of skill or technique do they hope they walk out of class with?
                    How do they best learn: Lecture, Demonstration, Reading, Collaboration, 
                    What kind of assessments do they do best with? Fill in the blank, matching, T/F, 
                    essay, etc.
                    (These are examples of pre-assessments)

                    What art did they like doing the most?
                    What project gave them the most struggle? Why?
                    If they were to suggest new projects what would they be?
                    What teaching method did they like most this year? 
                    What would you tell another student about this class to make sure they have 
                    success?
                    Describe the grading process of your projects?
                    What assessment tool for the class did you like the most? Why?
                    (These are examples of post-assessments)

                    Keep the entry and exit assessments simple, focused on what "you" want to know 
                    to build a better teaching environment. I do this every year. Yes, it takes a 
                    bit of time to review but can make structuring your classes for the next year 
                    productive plus administrators eat it up.

                    Jeff (Minnesota)

                    ____________ _________ _________ __

                    I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having 
                    resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade 
                    for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about 
                    finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never 
                    did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art 
                    teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 
                    7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so 
                    poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from 
                    kids. 

                    What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any 
                    suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my 
                    class(es)constructi vely? 

                    Thanks so much for your help!

                    Penny Lee 



                     
                    I just posted this on the AtrsEducators site so if you've read it before please excuse my repetitiveness. ....

                    I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids.

                    What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructi vely?

                    Thanks so much for your help!

                    Penny Lee





                  • Jeff Pridie
                    Warning personal opinion here I to have fallen into the trap of the poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, and
                    Message 9 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                      Warning personal opinion here

                      I to have fallen into the trap of the "poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, and the list goes on"

                      Teachers many times write surveys in such a way to "hear" what "they" want to "hear".  Change in any form is never clean nice and neat.  Hearing unpleasant comments also can be very damning to ones ego and esteem. 

                      So if you are ready for the truth survey your students.  The truth though has to be objective.  The way you gather the truth has to be meaningful for the student, valued and appreciated.  As a teacher you have to "craft" the survey so you gain the most insight as possible from the tool.

                      Guard yourself and "not" take it personally.  With all the well intended lessons you may have developed students may not have connected to them.  The key to many "non-connected" lessons is the delivery system and the product.  Were students given enough "choices" to demonstrate knowledge, skill, understanding.  Was it age appropriate.  Did students find ownership in the lesson, putting a personal stamp on it?

                      Finally with all well intended lessons some students will just simply not do for reasons you do not control.
                      Deep rooted personality issues, emotional issues, learning disabilities, cultural issues.  Finding the right trigger for these students is so individualized and takes time to find.

                      I think with surveys written specifically for individual classes can help identify some of the tools you will need to be successful.   I caution teachers using just a generic survey, a run off from the internet as it does not address many times the individualized needs specific school environments have.

                      Just some thoughts.

                      Jeff (minnesota)



                    • pent19
                      At the end of each project I have my students complete a checklist (a kid-friendly version of my rubric) on the checklist i ask them a few short answer
                      Message 10 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                        At the end of each project I have my students complete a checklist (a kid-friendly version of my rubric) on the checklist i ask them a few short answer questions- what did you learn, what did you like, what was difficult etc? i generally get honest answers and very few one worded or worthless answers. I also ask at the end of the year to rank this years projects (with clay usually being at the top). If i have some strugglers/stragglers i usually talk to them about whats going on and why they are frustrated. Generally their attitude has nothing to do with art but problems at home, with a friend etc. Sometimes just a few minutes chatting can turn that child around. Also, you could do a survey at the beginning of the year, on the first day and get a feel for attitudes and feelings and adjust your projects accordingly.
                        Michele

                        As the students get older i try to find more un-traditional materials to work with to motivate them and avoid redunance. I will be at my school for 3 years this fall and already have students looking forward to projects i have done with other kids. (some materials-copper tooling, recycled crayons, etc-i save these for the spring too when kids start getting ansy.)


                        >
                        > I am applying for an Art position in a school district that is new to me having resigned from the district I taught for 13 years (Art for 3 1/2 years; 6th grade for 9 years). One questions on the application is: "How will (do) you go about finding out about students' attitudes and feelings about your class?". I never did a survey or questionnaire when I taught Art in the school where I was an Art teacher; 1) as a new Art teacher I was trying to keep my head above water (I saw 7 classes a day [K-8th and MMR kids]) AND 2)the behavior and attitudes were so poor that I felt I wouldn't be able to get constructive criticism back from kids.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > What to do you (or do you use) to get constructive criticism from kids? Any suggestions as to ways I could find out about attitudes and feelings about my class(es)constructi vely?
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Thanks so much for your help!
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Penny Lee
                        >
                      • go4art@juno.com
                        Penny, like Jeff I have students complete an art survey when the class begins and a reflection at the end. Along with some of the concepts he mentioned, I
                        Message 11 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                          Penny, like Jeff I have students complete an art survey when the class begins and a reflection at the end. Along with some of the concepts he mentioned, I also include items to gather information about the classroom studio environment (do they like to work silently, with music, etc), about the class community (what can they contribute to make it positive, etc) and the experience (what advice would they give to new students, what they want me as the teacher do to help students, etc). It always proves to be both insightful and useful.

                          best wishes~
                          creatively, Linda
                          (middle school in Oregon)

                          ____________________________________________________________
                          LCD 42" TV for $26.42? Macbook Pro for $91.73?
                          Are these prices real? You WON'T Believe What We Found!
                          http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4c598dec405c3568c23st04vuc
                        • Penny Lee
                          Thanks, Jeff. I appreciate your insights and comments. I will consider them when I design a survey / feedback tool. I have had personal experience with what
                          Message 12 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                            Thanks, Jeff.  I appreciate your insights and comments.  I will consider them when I design a survey / feedback tool.  

                            I have had personal experience with what you refer to as "the
                            trap of the 'poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators,' " etc. and it's not a myth as you imply.  In my experience teaching Art in a K-8th grade setting I found not much support and / or respect regarding Art among the 7th / 8th grade teachers in fact they portrayed Art in a very secondary light both by their actions and words.  There was more however, varied support among other classroom teachersUnfortunately, the principal of this school demonstrated little support (and respect) for Art which could have made a "trickle-down" impression on my fellow teachers. 

                            Thanks again for your insights.

                            Penny Lee




                            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                            From: jeffpridie@...
                            Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 07:00:46 -0700
                            Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                             

                            Warning personal opinion here

                            I to have fallen into the trap of the "poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, and the list goes on"

                            Teachers many times write surveys in such a way to "hear" what "they" want to "hear".  Change in any form is never clean nice and neat.  Hearing unpleasant comments also can be very damning to ones ego and esteem. 

                            So if you are ready for the truth survey your students.  The truth though has to be objective.  The way you gather the truth has to be meaningful for the student, valued and appreciated.  As a teacher you have to "craft" the survey so you gain the most insight as possible from the tool.

                            Guard yourself and "not" take it personally.  With all the well intended lessons you may have developed students may not have connected to them.  The key to many "non-connected" lessons is the delivery system and the product.  Were students given enough "choices" to demonstrate knowledge, skill, understanding.  Was it age appropriate.  Did students find ownership in the lesson, putting a personal stamp on it?

                            Finally with all well intended lessons some students will just simply not do for reasons you do not control.
                            Deep rooted personality issues, emotional issues, learning disabilities, cultural issues.  Finding the right trigger for these students is so individualized and takes time to find.

                            I think with surveys written specifically for individual classes can help identify some of the tools you will need to be successful.   I caution teachers using just a generic survey, a run off from the internet as it does not address many times the individualized needs specific school environments have.

                            Just some thoughts.

                            Jeff (minnesota)




                          • Jeff Pridie
                            The disrespected art program that I refer to I did not intend to sound like it was a myth. Far from that it is a reality. In the 30 years of teaching I have
                            Message 13 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                              The disrespected art program that I refer to I did not intend to sound like it was a myth.  Far from that it is a reality.  In the 30 years of teaching I have seen that up and down trial over and over and over again. The decision after you have done all you can do to change that impression is that the environment you want to teach in, is it giving you growth?  As I have advised many teachers there is a time to bail seek a better environment that is "life giving" not "life taking".

                              Good adventures with your new position.  You have a great heart in wanting  the best for your students.

                              jeff (minnesota)




                               

                              Thanks, Jeff.  I appreciate your insights and comments.  I will consider them when I design a survey / feedback tool.  

                              I have had personal experience with what you refer to as "the
                              trap of the 'poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, ' " etc. and it's not a myth as you imply.  In my experience teaching Art in a K-8th grade setting I found not much support and / or respect regarding Art among the 7th / 8th grade teachers in fact they portrayed Art in a very secondary light both by their actions and words.  There was more however, varied support among other classroom teachersUnfortunately, the principal of this school demonstrated little support (and respect) for Art which could have made a "trickle-down" impression on my fellow teachers. 

                              Thanks again for your insights.

                              Penny Lee




                              To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                              From: jeffpridie@yahoo. com
                              Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 07:00:46 -0700
                              Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                               

                              Warning personal opinion here

                              I to have fallen into the trap of the "poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, and the list goes on"

                              Teachers many times write surveys in such a way to "hear" what "they" want to "hear".  Change in any form is never clean nice and neat.  Hearing unpleasant comments also can be very damning to ones ego and esteem. 

                              So if you are ready for the truth survey your students.  The truth though has to be objective.  The way you gather the truth has to be meaningful for the student, valued and appreciated.  As a teacher you have to "craft" the survey so you gain the most insight as possible from the tool.

                              Guard yourself and "not" take it personally.  With all the well intended lessons you may have developed students may not have connected to them.  The key to many "non-connected" lessons is the delivery system and the product.  Were students given enough "choices" to demonstrate knowledge, skill, understanding.  Was it age appropriate.  Did students find ownership in the lesson, putting a personal stamp on it?

                              Finally with all well intended lessons some students will just simply not do for reasons you do not control.
                              Deep rooted personality issues, emotional issues, learning disabilities, cultural issues.  Finding the right trigger for these students is so individualized and takes time to find.

                              I think with surveys written specifically for individual classes can help identify some of the tools you will need to be successful.   I caution teachers using just a generic survey, a run off from the internet as it does not address many times the individualized needs specific school environments have.

                              Just some thoughts.

                              Jeff (minnesota)





                            • Diane Gregory
                              Greetings! Art teachers have challenging jobs! Call me crazy, but this is what I like about it! It is like having a huge creative problem solving
                              Message 14 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                                Greetings!

                                Art teachers have challenging jobs!  Call me crazy, but this is what I like about it!  It is like having a huge creative problem solving opportunity.  What an opportunity it is!  I know art teachers are creative, passionate and committed professionals.  We are up to this challenge!

                                On the one hand art education is not given the respect it deserves and on the other hand we have such a passion for the value of an education in art.  We know in the very core of our being the importance of an education in art.  Just because others do not yet see it, doesn't make it so.

                                There can sometimes be a huge gap between what we would like to see and what is reality.  The larger the gap, the more discouraging it can be.  So I have to constantly remind myself of the value of an education in art and approach my work with a positive frame of mind.  This takes a lot of work.  It is not easy.  I have to constantly talk to myself.  I put quotes all over the place and have to replace my discouraging inner voice with positive thoughts...I can not go to that negative place to often or I would just quit...and I will not do that.

                                So when writing a survey or a questionnaire, be prepared to get comments that are discouraging.  But look for the good, the positive and the rewarding.  Write your questionnaire in such a way as to encourage positive, constructive comments.

                                We have a lot of work to do to change attitudes.  I am constantly reminded of some comments I have received from pre-service elementary classroom teachers.  I think I have posted them on the list.

                                Such as,

                                This course is a waste of my time.  I don't know why I have to take it.  I will have an art teacher and she will teach the art. (In Texas over 52% of classroom teachers teach their own art because there is no art teacher)

                                Why do I need to learn how to find and write art lesson plans?  We will have a book that will tell us what to teach. (In reality, there are no books provided even if they are provided by the state)

                                Art is not tested and there is no money to buy art supplies, so why do I need to know this stuff? (Art is not part of the state mandated TAKS test and I can understand the confusion.)

                                So we have a huge challenge on our hands.  We always have.  It is like climbing Mount Everest.

                                What constructive things can each of us do to change these pervasive attitudes in our culture and educational system?  What one thing can each of us do this year to make a difference?

                                What do you think?  What would you be willing to do that you are not doing now?

                                I will be launching the Blog ArtEdOnline and maybe in some small way we will be able to reach elementary classroom teachers through this blog.

                                What do you guys think?

                                Diane



                                 
                                The disrespected art program that I refer to I did not intend to sound like it was a myth.  Far from that it is a reality.  In the 30 years of teaching I have seen that up and down trial over and over and over again. The decision after you have done all you can do to change that impression is that the environment you want to teach in, is it giving you growth?  As I have advised many teachers there is a time to bail seek a better environment that is "life giving" not "life taking".

                                Good adventures with your new position.  You have a great heart in wanting  the best for your students.

                                jeff (minnesota)




                                 

                                Thanks, Jeff.  I appreciate your insights and comments.  I will consider them when I design a survey / feedback tool.  

                                I have had personal experience with what you refer to as "the
                                trap of the 'poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, ' " etc. and it's not a myth as you imply.  In my experience teaching Art in a K-8th grade setting I found not much support and / or respect regarding Art among the 7th / 8th grade teachers in fact they portrayed Art in a very secondary light both by their actions and words.  There was more however, varied support among other classroom teachersUnfortunately, the principal of this school demonstrated little support (and respect) for Art which could have made a "trickle-down" impression on my fellow teachers. 

                                Thanks again for your insights.

                                Penny Lee




                                To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                                From: jeffpridie@yahoo. com
                                Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 07:00:46 -0700
                                Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                                 

                                Warning personal opinion here

                                I to have fallen into the trap of the "poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, and the list goes on"

                                Teachers many times write surveys in such a way to "hear" what "they" want to "hear".  Change in any form is never clean nice and neat.  Hearing unpleasant comments also can be very damning to ones ego and esteem. 

                                So if you are ready for the truth survey your students.  The truth though has to be objective.  The way you gather the truth has to be meaningful for the student, valued and appreciated.  As a teacher you have to "craft" the survey so you gain the most insight as possible from the tool.

                                Guard yourself and "not" take it personally.  With all the well intended lessons you may have developed students may not have connected to them.  The key to many "non-connected" lessons is the delivery system and the product.  Were students given enough "choices" to demonstrate knowledge, skill, understanding.  Was it age appropriate.  Did students find ownership in the lesson, putting a personal stamp on it?

                                Finally with all well intended lessons some students will just simply not do for reasons you do not control.
                                Deep rooted personality issues, emotional issues, learning disabilities, cultural issues.  Finding the right trigger for these students is so individualized and takes time to find.

                                I think with surveys written specifically for individual classes can help identify some of the tools you will need to be successful.   I caution teachers using just a generic survey, a run off from the internet as it does not address many times the individualized needs specific school environments have.

                                Just some thoughts.

                                Jeff (minnesota)





                              • Penny Lee
                                Jeff, I truly appreciate the support you are giving me and others who are not in an environment that helps them grow and prosper as people, teachers, and
                                Message 15 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                                  Jeff, I truly appreciate the support you are giving me and others who are not in an environment that helps them grow and prosper as people, teachers, and artists.  Very often, I have found the institution that promotes respect, growth, positive behavior, etc. among students and teachers to students has a double standard regarding teachers and administrators to teachers.  It's a shame that education is what it is and that we spend lots of time nourishingkids and issues related to kids but extremely little time taking care of adults (other than parents).

                                  Penny




                                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                                  From: jeffpridie@...
                                  Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 10:29:05 -0700
                                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                                   

                                  The disrespected art program that I refer to I did not intend to sound like it was a myth.  Far from that it is a reality.  In the 30 years of teaching I have seen that up and down trial over and over and over again. The decision after you have done all you can do to change that impression is that the environment you want to teach in, is it giving you growth?  As I have advised many teachers there is a time to bail seek a better environment that is "life giving" not "life taking".

                                  Good adventures with your new position.  You have a great heart in wanting  the best for your students.

                                  jeff (minnesota)




                                   
                                  Thanks, Jeff.  I appreciate your insights and comments.  I will consider them when I design a survey / feedback tool.  

                                  I have had personal experience with what you refer to as "the
                                  trap of the 'poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, ' " etc. and it's not a myth as you imply.  In my experience teaching Art in a K-8th grade setting I found not much support and / or respect regarding Art among the 7th / 8th grade teachers in fact they portrayed Art in a very secondary light both by their actions and words.  There was more however, varied support among other classroom teachersUnfortunately, the principal of this school demonstrated little support (and respect) for Art which could have made a "trickle-down" impression on my fellow teachers. 

                                  Thanks again for your insights.

                                  Penny Lee





                                  To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                                  From: jeffpridie@yahoo. com
                                  Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 07:00:46 -0700
                                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                                   

                                  Warning personal opinion here

                                  I to have fallen into the trap of the "poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, and the list goes on"

                                  Teachers many times write surveys in such a way to "hear" what "they" want to "hear".  Change in any form is never clean nice and neat.  Hearing unpleasant comments also can be very damning to ones ego and esteem. 

                                  So if you are ready for the truth survey your students.  The truth though has to be objective.  The way you gather the truth has to be meaningful for the student, valued and appreciated.  As a teacher you have to "craft" the survey so you gain the most insight as possible from the tool.

                                  Guard yourself and "not" take it personally.  With all the well intended lessons you may have developed students may not have connected to them.  The key to many "non-connected" lessons is the delivery system and the product.  Were students given enough "choices" to demonstrate knowledge, skill, understanding.  Was it age appropriate.  Did students find ownership in the lesson, putting a personal stamp on it?

                                  Finally with all well intended lessons some students will just simply not do for reasons you do not control.
                                  Deep rooted personality issues, emotional issues, learning disabilities, cultural issues.  Finding the right trigger for these students is so individualized and takes time to find.

                                  I think with surveys written specifically for individual classes can help identify some of the tools you will need to be successful.   I caution teachers using just a generic survey, a run off from the internet as it does not address many times the individualized needs specific school environments have.

                                  Just some thoughts.

                                  Jeff (minnesota)






                                • Jeff Pridie
                                  First of all we realize we are not alone art educators even though we are from different parts of the country and world have and do face all the same issues.
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                                    First of all we realize we are not "alone" art educators even though we are from different parts of the country and world have and do face all the same issues.  We need to find that learning community where we can support, listen, offer advice, critique our thinking.  Support is the key.  So often as art educators we either isolate ourselves or are isolated due to the teaching environment.  Being here, venting, shoveling out all the "stuff" to others that are like in your situation can and is freeing for the soul, and sanity.  The online communities have truly been a god send as far as building community and developing professional learning communities.

                                    Jeff (minnesota)




                                     

                                    Jeff, I truly appreciate the support you are giving me and others who are not in an environment that helps them grow and prosper as people, teachers, and artists.  Very often, I have found the institution that promotes respect, growth, positive behavior, etc. among students and teachers to students has a double standard regarding teachers and administrators to teachers.  It's a shame that education is what it is and that we spend lots of time nourishingkids and issues related to kids but extremely little time taking care of adults (other than parents).

                                    Penny




                                    To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                                    From: jeffpridie@yahoo. com
                                    Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 10:29:05 -0700
                                    Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                                     

                                    The disrespected art program that I refer to I did not intend to sound like it was a myth.  Far from that it is a reality.  In the 30 years of teaching I have seen that up and down trial over and over and over again. The decision after you have done all you can do to change that impression is that the environment you want to teach in, is it giving you growth?  As I have advised many teachers there is a time to bail seek a better environment that is "life giving" not "life taking".

                                    Good adventures with your new position.  You have a great heart in wanting  the best for your students.

                                    jeff (minnesota)




                                     
                                    Thanks, Jeff.  I appreciate your insights and comments.  I will consider them when I design a survey / feedback tool.  

                                    I have had personal experience with what you refer to as "the
                                    trap of the 'poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, ' " etc. and it's not a myth as you imply.  In my experience teaching Art in a K-8th grade setting I found not much support and / or respect regarding Art among the 7th / 8th grade teachers in fact they portrayed Art in a very secondary light both by their actions and words.  There was more however, varied support among other classroom teachersUnfortunately, the principal of this school demonstrated little support (and respect) for Art which could have made a "trickle-down" impression on my fellow teachers. 

                                    Thanks again for your insights.

                                    Penny Lee





                                    To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                                    From: jeffpridie@yahoo. com
                                    Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 07:00:46 -0700
                                    Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice

                                     

                                    Warning personal opinion here

                                    I to have fallen into the trap of the "poor art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community, administrators, and the list goes on"

                                    Teachers many times write surveys in such a way to "hear" what "they" want to "hear".  Change in any form is never clean nice and neat.  Hearing unpleasant comments also can be very damning to ones ego and esteem. 

                                    So if you are ready for the truth survey your students.  The truth though has to be objective.  The way you gather the truth has to be meaningful for the student, valued and appreciated.  As a teacher you have to "craft" the survey so you gain the most insight as possible from the tool.

                                    Guard yourself and "not" take it personally.  With all the well intended lessons you may have developed students may not have connected to them.  The key to many "non-connected" lessons is the delivery system and the product.  Were students given enough "choices" to demonstrate knowledge, skill, understanding.  Was it age appropriate.  Did students find ownership in the lesson, putting a personal stamp on it?

                                    Finally with all well intended lessons some students will just simply not do for reasons you do not control.
                                    Deep rooted personality issues, emotional issues, learning disabilities, cultural issues.  Finding the right trigger for these students is so individualized and takes time to find.

                                    I think with surveys written specifically for individual classes can help identify some of the tools you will need to be successful.   I caution teachers using just a generic survey, a run off from the internet as it does not address many times the individualized needs specific school environments have.

                                    Just some thoughts.

                                    Jeff (minnesota)







                                  • Wanda
                                    Well said Jeff. It seems each year brings new challenges along with rewarding students and renewed energies. I hope each of us has a great new school year.
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Aug 4, 2010
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                                      Well said Jeff. It seems each year brings new challenges along with
                                      rewarding students and renewed energies. I hope each of us has a great
                                      new school year. Wanda

                                      In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > First of all we realize we are not "alone" art educators even though
                                      we are from
                                      > different parts of the country and world have and do face all the same
                                      issues.
                                      > We need to find that learning community where we can support, listen,
                                      offer
                                      > advice, critique our thinking. Support is the key. So often as art
                                      educators
                                      > we either isolate ourselves or are isolated due to the teaching
                                      environment.
                                      > Being here, venting, shoveling out all the "stuff" to others that are
                                      like in
                                      > your situation can and is freeing for the soul, and sanity. The online
                                      > communities have truly been a god send as far as building community
                                      and
                                      > developing professional learning communities.
                                      >
                                      > Jeff (minnesota)
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ________________________________
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Jeff, I truly appreciate the support you are giving me and others who
                                      are not in
                                      > an environment that helps them grow and prosper as people, teachers,
                                      and
                                      > artists. Very often, I have found the institution that promotes
                                      respect,
                                      > growth, positive behavior, etc. among students and teachers to
                                      students has a
                                      > double standard regarding teachers and administrators to teachers.
                                      It's a shame
                                      > that education is what it is and that we spend lots of time nourishing
                                      kids and
                                      > issues related to kids but extremely little time taking care of adults
                                      (other
                                      > than parents).
                                      >
                                      > Penny
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ________________________________
                                      > To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                                      > From: jeffpridie@yahoo. com
                                      > Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 10:29:05 -0700
                                      > Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > The disrespected art program that I refer to I did not intend to sound
                                      like it
                                      > was a myth. Far from that it is a reality. In the 30 years of teaching
                                      I have
                                      > seen that up and down trial over and over and over again. The decision
                                      after you
                                      > have done all you can do to change that impression is that the
                                      environment you
                                      > want to teach in, is it giving you growth? As I have advised many
                                      teachers
                                      > there is a time to bail seek a better environment that is "life
                                      giving" not
                                      > "life taking".
                                      >
                                      > Good adventures with your new position. You have a great heart in
                                      wanting the
                                      > best for your students.
                                      >
                                      > jeff (minnesota)
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ________________________________
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Thanks, Jeff. I appreciate your insights and comments. I will consider
                                      them
                                      > when I design a survey / feedback tool.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > I have had personal experience with what you refer to as "the trap of
                                      the 'poor
                                      > art, its never taken seriously by students, parents, community,
                                      administrators,
                                      > ' " etc. and it's not a myth as you imply. In my experience teaching
                                      Art in a
                                      > K-8th grade setting I found not much support and / or respect
                                      regarding Art
                                      > among the 7th / 8th grade teachers in fact they portrayed Art in a
                                      very
                                      > secondary light both by their actions and words. There was more
                                      however, varied
                                      > support among other classroom teachers. Unfortunately, the principal
                                      of this
                                      > school demonstrated little support (and respect) for Art which could
                                      have made a
                                      > "trickle-down" impression on my fellow teachers.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Thanks again for your insights.
                                      >
                                      > Penny Lee
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ________________________________
                                      > To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                                      > From: jeffpridie@yahoo. com
                                      > Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 07:00:46 -0700
                                      > Subject: Re: [art_education] Advice
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Warning personal opinion here
                                      >
                                      > I to have fallen into the trap of the "poor art, its never taken
                                      seriously by
                                      > students, parents, community, administrators, and the list goes on"
                                      >
                                      > Teachers many times write surveys in such a way to "hear" what "they"
                                      want to
                                      > "hear". Change in any form is never clean nice and neat. Hearing
                                      unpleasant
                                      > comments also can be very damning to ones ego and esteem.
                                      >
                                      > So if you are ready for the truth survey your students. The truth
                                      though has to
                                      > be objective. The way you gather the truth has to be meaningful for
                                      the
                                      > student, valued and appreciated. As a teacher you have to "craft" the
                                      survey so
                                      > you gain the most insight as possible from the tool.
                                      >
                                      > Guard yourself and "not" take it personally. With all the well
                                      intended lessons
                                      > you may have developed students may not have connected to them. The
                                      key to many
                                      > "non-connected" lessons is the delivery system and the product. Were
                                      students
                                      > given enough "choices" to demonstrate knowledge, skill, understanding.
                                      Was it
                                      > age appropriate. Did students find ownership in the lesson, putting a
                                      personal
                                      > stamp on it?
                                      >
                                      > Finally with all well intended lessons some students will just simply
                                      not do for
                                      > reasons you do not control.
                                      > Deep rooted personality issues, emotional issues, learning
                                      disabilities,
                                      > cultural issues. Finding the right trigger for these students is so
                                      > individualized and takes time to find.
                                      >
                                      > I think with surveys written specifically for individual classes can
                                      help
                                      > identify some of the tools you will need to be successful. I caution
                                      teachers
                                      > using just a generic survey, a run off from the internet as it does
                                      not address
                                      > many times the individualized needs specific school environments have.
                                      >
                                      > Just some thoughts.
                                      >
                                      > Jeff (minnesota)
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ________________________________
                                      >
                                    • kmartist1@yahoo.com
                                      Jeff, yours was some of the best advice I ve seen! Wish all of my children s teachers thought the same!
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Aug 5, 2010
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                                        Jeff, yours was some of the best advice I've seen! Wish all of my children's teachers thought the same!

                                      • Lynn Whitehead
                                        I feel, as art teachers, our power to promote serious support of an art program lies in the amazing artwork of our students. I am fortunate to have been at my
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Aug 5, 2010
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                                          I feel, as art teachers, our power to promote serious support of an
                                          art program lies in the amazing artwork of our students. I am
                                          fortunate to have been at my elementry school for 10 years now. The
                                          parents can't imagine not having an art program. When families have
                                          had to move to another school in the district, without an art program,
                                          they report back that their children are receiving a lesser education
                                          as a result.

                                          So, the more we can expose parents and the community to tha fabulous
                                          art their kids are creating the better. Parents need to be your "best
                                          friends." My parents have gone to bat for me more than once when I
                                          have needed money or when the art program has been threatened in any
                                          way.

                                          I realize that budgetary woes are still a major problem but I also
                                          think we can and do have an amazing impact on our students and their
                                          families. I always love hearing, for example, a parent or regular
                                          classroom teacher say, "I can't believe that first grade students are
                                          capable of such sophisticated artwork."

                                          Keep up your passionate work for the inclusion of the arts in our
                                          students' lives.

                                          Lynn
                                          Portland, OR
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