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Re: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

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  • Diane Gregory
    Yes, Penny, I hear you load and clear. So how do we help our students care and want to do a good job? How do we help our students understand the value of
    Message 1 of 22 , Jul 25, 2010
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      Yes, Penny, I hear you load and clear.  So how do we help our students care and want to do a good job?  How do we help our students understand the value of what an education in art has to offer.  How do we motivate them to care?  I think having some kind of poster is a great first start in helping students to push themselves.  It is one good tool and maybe there are others.

      I face this challenge every semester when I teach a course for pre-service elementary classroom teachers.  Most of my students dive in and embrace what the course is about.  Some however have said things to me like: 

      I will have a book that will teach me how to teach art and this stuff is a waste of my time,
      I won't have the budget to do the types of activities you are recommending
      I will have an art teacher who will be teaching art...this is not my responsibility.
      I don't know enough about teaching art after only one course
      Art is messy and I don't need the hassle
      I have to spend my time to help my students pass the TEST so I won't lose my job.  Art is not on the test, so why should I bother?

      These are real attitudes and false assumptions that many pre-service elementary classroom teachers hold.  It is not the majority of pre-service teachers, thank goodness.  However, there are enough of these students it makes me wonder how we can change these beliefs and attitudes.  I also wonder if my other pre-service classroom teachers occassionally think these things and are just too shy or polite to say what they really think.

      Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
      Henry David Thoreau, Walden


      Dr. Diane C. Gregory
      Associate Professor of Art Education
      Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
      dgregory@...


      From: Penny Lee <penny_lee53@...>
      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 1:35:37 PM
      Subject: RE: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

       

      I think that rushing to be finished is a major challenge in all classes / subject areas (except in most aspects of P.E.).  When I taught 6th grade for 9 years I constantly had to remind kids that there was no pot of gold at the end of the rainbow for finishing early (not to mention that often it wasn't done correctly or was haphazard looking).  In other words, NO REWARD.  In Art, it's been my experience in the short four years I've taught Art, that being finished early definitely means not meeting the expectations and / or standards, that best effort has more than likely NOT been made, and its appearance is compromised.  I try to impress upon students that Art takes time to do and can not be done haphazardly, but it's difficult for that idea to make a lasting impression on students that have convinced themselves they can't, don't care, or think Art is play / fun time and really don't want to participate and go through the motions instead.

      Penny




      To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
      From: gregory.diane55@ yahoo.com
      Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 08:29:52 -0700
      Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

       

      Michelle,

      This would indeed be a great poster to put up.  Maybe between the collective minds of all art teachers on the list we can come up with a list of items people would include.  It would be a great project to help us all start the upcoming academic year!

      You have started it off with some great ideas:

      Is this my best work?
      What have you learned?
      What else could I try?

      Consider adding more specific ingredients perhaps such as:

      What else could I learn?
      Have I evaluated my work to see what else needs to be done?
      Have I written
      an artist statement?
      Have I signed my work?
      Have I shown my work to others to get their suggestions?
      Am I proud of my work?  How does it compare to previous works I have made?
      Have I turned my work upside down to see how it looks from all angles?
      Have I journaled about my work to help me get new ideas to improve my work?
      How do I know I am done?

      Or more direct questions if you use the elements and principles:

      Does the work have a center of interest?
      Is the work visually balanced?
      Does it have variety of shape, color, line, etc.
      Is the work unified by repeating shapes, color, space, texture and value?
      Does the media used fit my idea or concept?
      Does it tell a compelling story, idea or feeling?
      Have the materials been used creatively?
      Does the idea, concept or feeling have a creative or compelling point of view
      Is it made well?

      Maybe we could come up with a list of ideas and people could come up with their
      own poster to hang up that fits within their grade level, curriculum and philosophy.

      I remember when I was an elementary art teacher that encouraging students to keep on keeping on,
      was one of my biggest challenges.  It is that way with my pre-service and in-service teachers, too.
      Sometimes, students just need some feedback, encouragement and motivation to keep working to do their
      very best!

      This poster could be referred to over and over again during each class.  One could make it a part of the daily
      routine!  It needs to be something that would set high standards!  It would communicate that you are setting high standards for both the process and the product of art making.

      You might consider making a digital poster using Glogster.  Check out this free technology by doing a search.  You could project this in your classroom or print it out and display it or both!

      I hope everyone joins in this discussion!  This could be a great activity for getting ready for school this fall!

      This is something I would love to put up on ArtEdOnline!

      Cheers,

      Diane


      Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
      Henry David Thoreau, Walden


      Dr. Diane C. Gregory
      Associate Professor of Art Education
      Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
      ArtEdOnline
      dgregory@mail. twu.edu


      From: pent19 <pent19@yahoo. com>
      To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 8:14:26 AM
      Subject: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

       
      i would love a generic "am i done?" poster to have students refer to. I have a checklist that i hang for each project that the students can use as a visually/written reminder of what they need to accomplish. I can announce, today you need to complete steps 1-5, then the next class i add the next set of directions. I use this with grades 3-6. (this is great for me too because i can give the same set of instructions for all 3 classes of each grade level, and really great for substitutes too!) I have also made a half sheet checklist for those "i am done!" students. They need to rate how they did and then write a few sentences about what they learned, liked and wish they could change. This usually keeps the early finishers busy for that one class period. I have sometimes had the more talented early finishers work on my teacher samples for me or help another student who has gotten behind. I have a list of volunteer jobs for the early finishers (who haven't rushed) to do. I really try to avoid free draw since students will rush a project to get to do a free draw (that mindset is embedded in my upper levels thanks to the former art teacher)
      I also try to create projects that can be modified for my learners-parts that can be added or taken away and not effect the learning objectives for the project.
      My big questions would be-
      have you done your best? why or why not?
      what would you change?
      what did you learn?
      have you completed the requirements? (concept, signture, mounted?)

      michele



    • Sue Stevens
      I ve created a draft of a poster for my classroom based on this idea.....what do you think? Sue
      Message 2 of 22 , Jul 25, 2010
      
      I've created a draft of a poster for my classroom based on this idea.....what do you think?
      Sue
    • Penny Lee
      I like it!!!! Penny Lee To: art_education@yahoogroups.com From: suestevens@rogers.com Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 17:27:34 -0400 Subject: Re: [art_education]
      Message 3 of 22 , Jul 25, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        I like it!!!!

        Penny Lee




        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        From: suestevens@...
        Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 17:27:34 -0400
        Subject: Re: [art_education] Reminders for fast finishers FILE attached [1 Attachment]

         
        [Attachment(s) from Sue Stevens included below] 
        I've created a draft of a poster for my classroom based on this idea.....what do you think?
        Sue

      • Penny Lee
        First off the (other / classroom) teachers at the site need to get on-board with Art education. The school (Kindergarten - 8th grade) that I just left was a
        Message 4 of 22 , Jul 25, 2010
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          First off the (other / classroom) teachers at the site need to get on-board with Art education.  The school (Kindergarten - 8th grade) that I just left was a real up-hill battle for me particularly with the 7th / 8th grade staff members.  Several of them even went to the extreme of telling students that they (the students) didn't need to take Art to graduate from high school (which was and still is the case in Arizona although w/ recent budget cuts various school districts may have changed their interpretation).  Many kids came late to Art because of a participation in another area of interest such a student council, book club, etc. or just assisting one of the 7th / 8th grade teachers w/ something such as putting computers away, etc. teachers

          Also, whenever we had a yearly Art show whether on site or at the local university (participation was district mandated) the principal never showed up to even do a quick walk through on either occasion.


          More comments to come; just wanted to pass that on to you initially.

          Penny




          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          From: gregory.diane55@...
          Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 11:46:26 -0700
          Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

           

          Yes, Penny, I hear you load and clear.  So how do we help our students care and want to do a good job?  How do we help our students understand the value of what an education in art has to offer.  How do we motivate them to care?  I think having some kind of poster is a great first start in helping students to push themselves.  It is one good tool and maybe there are others.

          I face this challenge every semester when I teach a course for pre-service elementary classroom teachers.  Most of my students dive in and embrace what the course is about.  Some however have said things to me like: 

          I will have a book that will teach me how to teach art and this stuff is a waste of my time,
          I won't have the budget to do the types of activities you are recommending
          I will have an art teacher who will be teaching art...this is not my responsibility.
          I don't know enough about teaching art after only one course
          Art is messy and I don't need the hassle
          I have to spend my time to help my students pass the TEST so I won't lose my job.  Art is not on the test, so why should I bother?

          These are real attitudes and false assumptions that many pre-service elementary classroom teachers hold.  It is not the majority of pre-service teachers, thank goodness.  However, there are enough of these students it makes me wonder how we can change these beliefs and attitudes.  I also wonder if my other pre-service classroom teachers occassionally think these things and are just too shy or polite to say what they really think.

          Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
          Henry David Thoreau, Walden


          Dr. Diane C. Gregory
          Associate Professor of Art Education
          Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
          dgregory@mail. twu.edu


          From: Penny Lee <penny_lee53@ hotmail.com>
          To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 1:35:37 PM
          Subject: RE: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

           
          I think that rushing to be finished is a major challenge in all classes / subject areas (except in most aspects of P.E.).  When I taught 6th grade for 9 years I constantly had to remind kids that there was no pot of gold at the end of the rainbow for finishing early (not to mention that often it wasn't done correctly or was haphazard looking).  In other words, NO REWARD.  In Art, it's been my experience in the short four years I've taught Art, that being finished early definitely means not meeting the expectations and / or standards, that best effort has more than likely NOT been made, and its appearance is compromised.  I try to impress upon students that Art takes time to do and can not be done haphazardly, but it's difficult for that idea to make a lasting impression on students that have convinced themselves they can't, don't care, or think Art is play / fun time and really don't want to participate and go through the motions instead.

          Penny





          To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
          From: gregory.diane55@ yahoo.com
          Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 08:29:52 -0700
          Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

           

          Michelle,

          This would indeed be a great poster to put up.  Maybe between the collective minds of all art teachers on the list we can come up with a list of items people would include.  It would be a great project to help us all start the upcoming academic year!

          You have started it off with some great ideas:

          Is this my best work?
          What have you learned?
          What else could I try?

          Consider adding more specific ingredients perhaps such as:

          What else could I learn?
          Have I evaluated my work to see what else needs to be done?
          Have I written
          an artist statement?
          Have I signed my work?
          Have I shown my work to others to get their suggestions?
          Am I proud of my work?  How does it compare to previous works I have made?
          Have I turned my work upside down to see how it looks from all angles?
          Have I journaled about my work to help me get new ideas to improve my work?
          How do I know I am done?

          Or more direct questions if you use the elements and principles:

          Does the work have a center of interest?
          Is the work visually balanced?
          Does it have variety of shape, color, line, etc.
          Is the work unified by repeating shapes, color, space, texture and value?
          Does the media used fit my idea or concept?
          Does it tell a compelling story, idea or feeling?
          Have the materials been used creatively?
          Does the idea, concept or feeling have a creative or compelling point of view
          Is it made well?

          Maybe we could come up with a list of ideas and people could come up with their
          own poster to hang up that fits within their grade level, curriculum and philosophy.

          I remember when I was an elementary art teacher that encouraging students to keep on keeping on,
          was one of my biggest challenges.  It is that way with my pre-service and in-service teachers, too.
          Sometimes, students just need some feedback, encouragement and motivation to keep working to do their
          very best!

          This poster could be referred to over and over again during each class.  One could make it a part of the daily
          routine!  It needs to be something that would set high standards!  It would communicate that you are setting high standards for both the process and the product of art making.

          You might consider making a digital poster using Glogster.  Check out this free technology by doing a search.  You could project this in your classroom or print it out and display it or both!

          I hope everyone joins in this discussion!  This could be a great activity for getting ready for school this fall!

          This is something I would love to put up on ArtEdOnline!

          Cheers,

          Diane


          Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
          Henry David Thoreau, Walden


          Dr. Diane C. Gregory
          Associate Professor of Art Education
          Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
          ArtEdOnline
          dgregory@mail. twu.edu


          From: pent19 <pent19@yahoo. com>
          To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 8:14:26 AM
          Subject: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

           
          i would love a generic "am i done?" poster to have students refer to. I have a checklist that i hang for each project that the students can use as a visually/written reminder of what they need to accomplish. I can announce, today you need to complete steps 1-5, then the next class i add the next set of directions. I use this with grades 3-6. (this is great for me too because i can give the same set of instructions for all 3 classes of each grade level, and really great for substitutes too!) I have also made a half sheet checklist for those "i am done!" students. They need to rate how they did and then write a few sentences about what they learned, liked and wish they could change. This usually keeps the early finishers busy for that one class period. I have sometimes had the more talented early finishers work on my teacher samples for me or help another student who has gotten behind. I have a list of volunteer jobs for the early finishers (who haven't rushed) to do. I really try to avoid free draw since students will rush a project to get to do a free draw (that mindset is embedded in my upper levels thanks to the former art teacher)
          I also try to create projects that can be modified for my learners-parts that can be added or taken away and not effect the learning objectives for the project.
          My big questions would be-
          have you done your best? why or why not?
          what would you change?
          what did you learn?
          have you completed the requirements? (concept, signture, mounted?)

          michele




        • Paige Conn
          Maybe change the wording from done to compete or the like.  I always tell my students done is a cake . One time I had a student say, I am done.   I
          Message 5 of 22 , Jul 26, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Maybe change the wording from "done" to "compete" or the like.  I always tell my students "done is a cake".
             
            One time I had a student say, "I am done."  I replied, "Done?"  trying to encourage a different word choice and he said, "Yep, done as a cake."  All with a sincere, straight face.
             
            Paige


            From: Sue Stevens <suestevens@...>
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 4:27:34 PM
            Subject: Re: [art_education] Reminders for fast finishers FILE attached [1 Attachment]

             

            

            I've created a draft of a poster for my classroom based on this idea.....what do you think?
            Sue

          • Kathleen Maledon
            I also like following the genesis of the idea: I saw Mary s colors, I remembered Van Gogh s swirls in Starry Night ...
            Message 6 of 22 , Jul 27, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              I also like following the genesis of the idea: I saw Mary's colors, I remembered Van Gogh's swirls in "Starry Night" ...
              On Jul 25, 2010, at 8:29 AM, Diane Gregory wrote:


              Michelle,

              This would indeed be a great poster to put up.  Maybe between the collective minds of all art teachers on the list we can come up with a list of items people would include.  It would be a great project to help us all start the upcoming academic year!

              You have started it off with some great ideas:

              Is this my best work?
              What have you learned?
              What else could I try?

              Consider adding more specific ingredients perhaps such as:

              What else could I learn?
              Have I evaluated my work to see what else needs to be done?
              Have I written 
              an artist statement?
              Have I signed my work?
              Have I shown my work to others to get their suggestions?
              Am I proud of my work?  How does it compare to previous works I have made?
              Have I turned my work upside down to see how it looks from all angles?
              Have I journaled about my work to help me get new ideas to improve my work?
              How do I know I am done?

              Or more direct questions if you use the elements and principles:

              Does the work have a center of interest?
              Is the work visually balanced?
              Does it have variety of shape, color, line, etc.
              Is the work unified by repeating shapes, color, space, texture and value?
              Does the media used fit my idea or concept?
              Does it tell a compelling story, idea or feeling?
              Have the materials been used creatively?
              Does the idea, concept or feeling have a creative or compelling point of view
              Is it made well?

              Maybe we could come up with a list of ideas and people could come up with their
              own poster to hang up that fits within their grade level, curriculum and philosophy.

              I remember when I was an elementary art teacher that encouraging students to keep on keeping on,
              was one of my biggest challenges.  It is that way with my pre-service and in-service teachers, too.
              Sometimes, students just need some feedback, encouragement and motivation to keep working to do their
              very best!

              This poster could be referred to over and over again during each class.  One could make it a part of the daily
              routine!  It needs to be something that would set high standards!  It would communicate that you are setting high standards for both the process and the product of art making.

              You might consider making a digital poster using Glogster.  Check out this free technology by doing a search.  You could project this in your classroom or print it out and display it or both!

              I hope everyone joins in this discussion!  This could be a great activity for getting ready for school this fall!

              This is something I would love to put up on ArtEdOnline!

              Cheers,

              Diane


              Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
              Henry David Thoreau, Walden


              Dr. Diane C. Gregory
              Associate Professor of Art Education
              Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
              ArtEdOnline
              dgregory@mail. twu.edu


              From: pent19 <pent19@yahoo. com>
              To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 8:14:26 AM
              Subject: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

               

              i would love a generic "am i done?" poster to have students refer to. I have a checklist that i hang for each project that the students can use as a visually/written reminder of what they need to accomplish. I can announce, today you need to complete steps 1-5, then the next class i add the next set of directions. I use this with grades 3-6. (this is great for me too because i can give the same set of instructions for all 3 classes of each grade level, and really great for substitutes too!) I have also made a half sheet checklist for those "i am done!" students. They need to rate how they did and then write a few sentences about what they learned, liked and wish they could change. This usually keeps the early finishers busy for that one class period. I have sometimes had the more talented early finishers work on my teacher samples for me or help another student who has gotten behind. I have a list of volunteer jobs for the early finishers (who haven't rushed) to do. I really try to avoid free draw since students will rush a project to get to do a free draw (that mindset is embedded in my upper levels thanks to the former art teacher) 
              I also try to create projects that can be modified for my learners-parts that can be added or taken away and not effect the learning objectives for the project. 
              My big questions would be-
              have you done your best? why or why not?
              what would you change?
              what did you learn?
              have you completed the requirements? (concept, signture, mounted?)

              michele



            • Kathleen Maledon
              could you slap them?
              Message 7 of 22 , Jul 27, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                could you slap them?
                On Jul 25, 2010, at 11:46 AM, Diane Gregory wrote:


                Yes, Penny, I hear you load and clear.  So how do we help our students care and want to do a good job?  How do we help our students understand the value of what an education in art has to offer.  How do we motivate them to care?  I think having some kind of poster is a great first start in helping students to push themselves.  It is one good tool and maybe there are others.

                I face this challenge every semester when I teach a course for pre-service elementary classroom teachers.  Most of my students dive in and embrace what the course is about.  Some however have said things to me like:  

                I will have a book that will teach me how to teach art and this stuff is a waste of my time, 
                I won't have the budget to do the types of activities you are recommending
                I will have an art teacher who will be teaching art...this is not my responsibility.
                I don't know enough about teaching art after only one course
                Art is messy and I don't need the hassle
                I have to spend my time to help my students pass the TEST so I won't lose my job.  Art is not on the test, so why should I bother?

                These are real attitudes and false assumptions that many pre-service elementary classroom teachers hold.  It is not the majority of pre-service teachers, thank goodness.  However, there are enough of these students it makes me wonder how we can change these beliefs and attitudes.  I also wonder if my other pre-service classroom teachers occassionally think these things and are just too shy or polite to say what they really think.

                Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
                Henry David Thoreau, Walden


                Dr. Diane C. Gregory
                Associate Professor of Art Education
                Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
                dgregory@mail. twu.edu


                From: Penny Lee <penny_lee53@ hotmail.com>
                To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 1:35:37 PM
                Subject: RE: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

                 

                I think that rushing to be finished is a major challenge in all classes / subject areas (except in most aspects of P.E.).  When I taught 6th grade for 9 years I constantly had to remind kids that there was no pot of gold at the end of the rainbow for finishing early (not to mention that often it wasn't done correctly or was haphazard looking).  In other words, NO REWARD.  In Art, it's been my experience in the short four years I've taught Art, that being finished early definitely means not meeting the expectations and / or standards, that best effort has more than likely NOT been made, and its appearance is compromised.  I try to impress upon students that Art takes time to do and can not be done haphazardly, but it's difficult for that idea to make a lasting impression on students that have convinced themselves they can't, don't care, or think Art is play / fun time and really don't want to participate and go through the motions instead.

                Penny




                To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                From: gregory.diane55@ yahoo.com
                Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 08:29:52 -0700
                Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

                 

                Michelle,

                This would indeed be a great poster to put up.  Maybe between the collective minds of all art teachers on the list we can come up with a list of items people would include.  It would be a great project to help us all start the upcoming academic year!

                You have started it off with some great ideas:

                Is this my best work?
                What have you learned?
                What else could I try?

                Consider adding more specific ingredients perhaps such as:

                What else could I learn?
                Have I evaluated my work to see what else needs to be done?
                Have I written 
                an artist statement?
                Have I signed my work?
                Have I shown my work to others to get their suggestions?
                Am I proud of my work?  How does it compare to previous works I have made?
                Have I turned my work upside down to see how it looks from all angles?
                Have I journaled about my work to help me get new ideas to improve my work?
                How do I know I am done?

                Or more direct questions if you use the elements and principles:

                Does the work have a center of interest?
                Is the work visually balanced?
                Does it have variety of shape, color, line, etc.
                Is the work unified by repeating shapes, color, space, texture and value?
                Does the media used fit my idea or concept?
                Does it tell a compelling story, idea or feeling?
                Have the materials been used creatively?
                Does the idea, concept or feeling have a creative or compelling point of view
                Is it made well?

                Maybe we could come up with a list of ideas and people could come up with their
                own poster to hang up that fits within their grade level, curriculum and philosophy.

                I remember when I was an elementary art teacher that encouraging students to keep on keeping on,
                was one of my biggest challenges.  It is that way with my pre-service and in-service teachers, too.
                Sometimes, students just need some feedback, encouragement and motivation to keep working to do their
                very best!

                This poster could be referred to over and over again during each class.  One could make it a part of the daily
                routine!  It needs to be something that would set high standards!  It would communicate that you are setting high standards for both the process and the product of art making.

                You might consider making a digital poster using Glogster.  Check out this free technology by doing a search.  You could project this in your classroom or print it out and display it or both!

                I hope everyone joins in this discussion!  This could be a great activity for getting ready for school this fall!

                This is something I would love to put up on ArtEdOnline!

                Cheers,

                Diane


                Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've Imagined!
                Henry David Thoreau, Walden


                Dr. Diane C. Gregory
                Associate Professor of Art Education
                Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
                ArtEdOnline
                dgregory@mail. twu.edu


                From: pent19 <pent19@yahoo. com>
                To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Sun, July 25, 2010 8:14:26 AM
                Subject: [art_education] Re: Reminders for fast finishers

                 
                i would love a generic "am i done?" poster to have students refer to. I have a checklist that i hang for each project that the students can use as a visually/written reminder of what they need to accomplish. I can announce, today you need to complete steps 1-5, then the next class i add the next set of directions. I use this with grades 3-6. (this is great for me too because i can give the same set of instructions for all 3 classes of each grade level, and really great for substitutes too!) I have also made a half sheet checklist for those "i am done!" students. They need to rate how they did and then write a few sentences about what they learned, liked and wish they could change. This usually keeps the early finishers busy for that one class period. I have sometimes had the more talented early finishers work on my teacher samples for me or help another student who has gotten behind. I have a list of volunteer jobs for the early finishers (who haven't rushed) to do. I really try to avoid free draw since students will rush a project to get to do a free draw (that mindset is embedded in my upper levels thanks to the former art teacher) 
                I also try to create projects that can be modified for my learners-parts that can be added or taken away and not effect the learning objectives for the project. 
                My big questions would be-
                have you done your best? why or why not?
                what would you change?
                what did you learn?
                have you completed the requirements? (concept, signture, mounted?)

                michele





              • printmaking04
                Awesome, gets the point accross, with few words. They say kids are easy to remember rules in numbers from 3-5. Jessica
                Message 8 of 22 , Jul 29, 2010
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                  Awesome, gets the point accross, with few words. They say kids are easy to remember rules in numbers from 3-5.

                  Jessica
                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I've created a draft of a poster for my classroom based on this idea.....what do you think?
                  > Sue
                  >
                • printmaking04
                  Michelle, May I ask what your volunteer list looks like. As others do, I struggle with early finishers, and those that don t rush, but need something to do,
                  Message 9 of 22 , Jul 29, 2010
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                    Michelle,

                    May I ask what your volunteer list looks like. As others do, I struggle with early finishers, and those that don't rush, but need something to do, and volunteer. Though I was wondering what your list consisted of, and do you post it, or keep it on your desk?

                    Thanks,
                    Jessica

                    --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "pent19" <pent19@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > i would love a generic "am i done?" poster to have students refer to. I have a checklist that i hang for each project that the students can use as a visually/written reminder of what they need to accomplish. I can announce, today you need to complete steps 1-5, then the next class i add the next set of directions. I use this with grades 3-6. (this is great for me too because i can give the same set of instructions for all 3 classes of each grade level, and really great for substitutes too!) I have also made a half sheet checklist for those "i am done!" students. They need to rate how they did and then write a few sentences about what they learned, liked and wish they could change. This usually keeps the early finishers busy for that one class period. I have sometimes had the more talented early finishers work on my teacher samples for me or help another student who has gotten behind. I have a list of volunteer jobs for the early finishers (who haven't rushed) to do. I really try to avoid free draw since students will rush a project to get to do a free draw (that mindset is embedded in my upper levels thanks to the former art teacher)
                    > I also try to create projects that can be modified for my learners-parts that can be added or taken away and not effect the learning objectives for the project.
                    > My big questions would be-
                    > have you done your best? why or why not?
                    > what would you change?
                    > what did you learn?
                    > have you completed the requirements? (concept, signture, mounted?)
                    >
                    > michele
                    >
                  • stabby
                    Your response is totally helpful and I could use the initials L.I.C.!! so that when they think they are finished, I could say, well, did you L.I.C. your
                    Message 10 of 22 , Jul 30, 2010
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                      Your response is totally helpful and I could use the initials L.I.C.!! so that when they think they are finished, I could say, "well, did you L.I.C. your work?" and point to the reminder poster! Love iT!!!Thanks!

                      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Oh....I like this idea. As I am highschool, my ideas may not translate to K-8...but here's my thoughts....(and I have to say that those thoughts are changing as I type...)
                      >
                      > If you think you are done your artwork....
                      > LOOK...IMPROVE....CHECK
                      > Look at the artwork for 2 minutes. Look at how the elements and principles are used.
                      > Improve three areas: add more dtails maybe, or clean up edges, or make an area darker....
                      > Check the criteria for the project. Have you done everything needed? If you were making it, would you give yourself perfect.
                      >
                      > At this point, I'm not completely sure about the three main works....although if you take the first letters, you could say 'have you LICed it yet?' ha ha ha.
                      >
                      > Does anyone have a good idea for a brief, to the point "if you think you're finished" poster that I can simply point to reminding the kids that they are indeed not done with their project and they could put a bit more effort into their piece before submission. Something to the effect of:
                      >
                      > If you think you are done with your piece:
                      >
                      > 1) Look at it again for two minutes.
                      > 2) Add three more precise details.
                      > 3) Check to see that .................????
                      >
                      > would be great if this very generic reminder could translate to K-8 and could be for any project from drawing to sculpture.
                      >
                      > This is for the kids who are done 15 minutes early and haven't followed all of the directions or have just given up trying to tidy up their piece because they may be unmotivated or have given up.
                      >
                    • pent19
                      My elementary school is next to a high school so we have volunteers that come over from there and i also have my own students helpers. I have an ongoing list i
                      Message 11 of 22 , Aug 1, 2010
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                        My elementary school is next to a high school so we have volunteers that come over from there and i also have my own students helpers. I have an ongoing list i keep on my desk of things they can do and when i think of a new one i can put it on there. i update it daily or weekly of things i could have someone else do for me, but will need to do myself if i can't get a helper.
                        Here's some of my ideas
                        -go to library and get newspaper for newspaper bin
                        -pick up my laminated stuff and cut it out.
                        -take down artwork in hall
                        -make tape balls (roll the masking tape so i can hang work during my free period. they stick the rolled tape to my art cart that i use when i am out hanging artwork. This saves me so much time as tape rolling is the most consuming part about hanging artwor
                        -label project paper with kindergartners names ( have a master class list available)
                        -sort paper by classes
                        -pass back artworks
                        -sharpen pencils
                        -organize materials (mine are often sorted by color, need to be resorted)
                        -clear off drying rack
                        -put k,1,2 work in portfolios
                        -clear off, erase and clean chalkboard, put materials back on chalkboard
                        -help change over bulletin boards
                        -cutting, punching, stapling and sorting things
                        -washing palettes and brushes
                        i also train some students during a free period to help me out with special tasks. I train 3-4 students on each; reclaiming clay, using a mini cutting board, hanging artwork, unloading a kiln, photographing artwork, i can count on these kids to give me a hand with these tasks when they are done early, since they have been trained on free time having them do this won't interfere with me instructing other students.. these are usually motivated and talented 5th and 6th graders, but could be a student who needs a lil extra attention.
                        If my early finishers get done, i give them a few options off the list, some will pick and some of the will go back and work on their 'finished' project. it does the trick
                        Michele NY



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                      • printmaking04
                        that is a good checklist thanks for sharing.
                        Message 12 of 22 , Aug 6, 2010
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                          that is a good checklist thanks for sharing.
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