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taking artwork home

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  • laura_tierney
    I am a new art teacher and so I haven t seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home? I have problems
    Message 1 of 10 , May 17, 2010
      I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home?
      I have problems with them getting their 2D work home. I can't imagine what would become of 3D work. I work in a Title 1 elementary school.
      Thanks
      Laura
    • Cheryl Hancock
      I have been make a large envelopes for storing all the childrens art work during the year. This will be the last time. Next year I will purchase nice paper
      Message 2 of 10 , May 17, 2010
        I have been make a large envelopes  for storing all the childrens art work during the year. This will be the last time. Next year I will purchase nice paper bags with a rectangluar base ( gusset) in them. They can decorate them  with paint etc for one of the lessons. I also found biodegradable plastic ones at the wholesaler which would also be a cheaper solution. I save up bubble wrap for 3D clay art work .
        Cheers 
        Cheryl H


        On Mon, May 17, 2010 at 9:23 PM, laura_tierney <laura_tierney@...> wrote:
         

        I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home?
        I have problems with them getting their 2D work home. I can't imagine what would become of 3D work. I work in a Title 1 elementary school.
        Thanks
        Laura




        --
        Cheryl Hancock
        Cooper, Dior and Charisma
        Perth Australia
      • aliteachesart
        Hi Laura, I have each table keep their flat work in their table portfolio - a 12X18 paper folded in half w/ their names on the front. They are color coded
        Message 3 of 10 , May 17, 2010
          Hi Laura,

          I have each table keep their flat work in their table "portfolio"- a 12X18 paper folded in half w/ their names on the front. They are color coded and this makes it so easy to pass back work. They take work home around each report card, keeping a few of the best in the portfolio until after art show selection. When work goes home I have them make "an art taco" folding it into a U shape, with the largest on the outside. They hold the art taco next to their tummies and put it in their backpacks to go home without creases. 3d work goes home in their hands on the bus. I tell them to hold it like a hamster with two hands gently so they don't squish it, yet firmly so it doesn't wiggle away. Some things still break, but not as many as when I used to wrap them and then they'd get knocked around in their backpacks on the bus. Hope this helps, it works for me! Ali k-4

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "laura_tierney" <laura_tierney@...> wrote:
          >
          > I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home?
          > I have problems with them getting their 2D work home. I can't imagine what would become of 3D work. I work in a Title 1 elementary school.
          > Thanks
          > Laura
          >
        • Dave Hoffmann
          Hi Laura,      Depending on the age and the classroom teacher, I do one of 2 things.  I have the students bring their backpacks to art and we pack up the
          Message 4 of 10 , May 17, 2010
            Hi Laura,
                 Depending on the age and the classroom teacher, I do one of 2 things.  I have the students bring their backpacks to art and we pack up the 2D pieces.  With some goups, the teacher prefers to hand out the art and put it in a folder that they're sending home.  The 3D pieces I send with them back to their classroom and wish them good luck ..LOL JK.  They are usually pretty proud of their peice and we talk about how to get it home safely so their family can see the artist they are.
            Good luck,  :)
            Dave


            From: aliteachesart <abenton@...>
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, May 17, 2010 2:20:20 PM
            Subject: [art_education] Re: taking artwork home

             

            Hi Laura,

            I have each table keep their flat work in their table "portfolio"- a 12X18 paper folded in half w/ their names on the front. They are color coded and this makes it so easy to pass back work. They take work home around each report card, keeping a few of the best in the portfolio until after art show selection. When work goes home I have them make "an art taco" folding it into a U shape, with the largest on the outside. They hold the art taco next to their tummies and put it in their backpacks to go home without creases. 3d work goes home in their hands on the bus. I tell them to hold it like a hamster with two hands gently so they don't squish it, yet firmly so it doesn't wiggle away. Some things still break, but not as many as when I used to wrap them and then they'd get knocked around in their backpacks on the bus. Hope this helps, it works for me! Ali k-4

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "laura_tierney" <laura_tierney@...> wrote:

            >
            > I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home?
            > I have problems with them getting their 2D work home. I can't imagine what would become of 3D work. I work in a Title 1 elementary school.
            > Thanks
            > Laura
            >


          • Kelli Wilke
            I have somewhat of a different problem.  I have a problem with kids not wanting to take their artwork home.  I find it stuffed in trash cans throughout the
            Message 5 of 10 , May 17, 2010
              I have somewhat of a different problem.  I have a problem with kids not wanting to take their artwork home.  I find it stuffed in trash cans throughout the school.  It's very disheartening, even after I tell them how important it is to take home to show their families.  Unfortunately some kids have families members who couldn't care less about their work and they probably don't want to deal with that rejection.  So sad.  One way I deal with 3-D artwork is to let them take it back to their last period class (I have middle school) and then they can take it home from there.  I don't let them stuff it in their lockers.
               
              Kelli in NE

              --- On Mon, 5/17/10, Dave Hoffmann <djustdave2002@...> wrote:

              From: Dave Hoffmann <djustdave2002@...>
              Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: taking artwork home
              To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, May 17, 2010, 3:00 PM

               
              Hi Laura,
                   Depending on the age and the classroom teacher, I do one of 2 things.  I have the students bring their backpacks to art and we pack up the 2D pieces.  With some goups, the teacher prefers to hand out the art and put it in a folder that they're sending home.  The 3D pieces I send with them back to their classroom and wish them good luck ..LOL JK.  They are usually pretty proud of their peice and we talk about how to get it home safely so their family can see the artist they are.
              Good luck,  :)
              Dave


              From: aliteachesart <abenton@potsdam. k12.ny.us>
              To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Mon, May 17, 2010 2:20:20 PM
              Subject: [art_education] Re: taking artwork home

               
              Hi Laura,

              I have each table keep their flat work in their table "portfolio"- a 12X18 paper folded in half w/ their names on the front. They are color coded and this makes it so easy to pass back work. They take work home around each report card, keeping a few of the best in the portfolio until after art show selection. When work goes home I have them make "an art taco" folding it into a U shape, with the largest on the outside. They hold the art taco next to their tummies and put it in their backpacks to go home without creases. 3d work goes home in their hands on the bus. I tell them to hold it like a hamster with two hands gently so they don't squish it, yet firmly so it doesn't wiggle away. Some things still break, but not as many as when I used to wrap them and then they'd get knocked around in their backpacks on the bus. Hope this helps, it works for me! Ali k-4

              --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "laura_tierney" <laura_tierney@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home?
              > I have problems with them getting their 2D work home. I can't imagine what would become of 3D work. I work in a Title 1 elementary school.
              > Thanks
              > Laura
              >



            • MARYANN KOHL
              Depending on the age, one issue is that many kids love the exploration and the activity, but they don t really care that much about the finished product. If
              Message 6 of 10 , May 17, 2010
                Depending on the age, one issue is that many kids love the exploration and the activity, but they don't really care that much about the finished product. If you encourage a process of discovery, sometimes that is all they love and adore, not how it looks. So that's one thing. Another is that parents and families are so busy and there is really no where to put stuff, and so, bringing things home is very anti climatic and often things are ignored and tossed out anyway. I think they save themselves the trouble. Plus some kids get teased on the bus if they are carrying their projects. So on and on... you might ask them why they toss their stuff. Sounds like you have a handle of some of the reasons...


                . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
                MaryAnn Kohl




                On May 17, 2010, at 6:46 PM, Kelli Wilke wrote:


                I have somewhat of a different problem.  I have a problem with kids not wanting to take their artwork home.  I find it stuffed in trash cans throughout the school.  It's very disheartening, even after I tell them how important it is to take home to show their families.  Unfortunately some kids have families members who couldn't care less about their work and they probably don't want to deal with that rejection.  So sad.  One way I deal with 3-D artwork is to let them take it back to their last period class (I have middle school) and then they can take it home from there.  I don't let them stuff it in their lockers.
                 
                Kelli in NE

                --- On Mon, 5/17/10, Dave Hoffmann <djustdave2002@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                From: Dave Hoffmann <djustdave2002@ yahoo.com>
                Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: taking artwork home
                To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Monday, May 17, 2010, 3:00 PM

                 
                Hi Laura,
                     Depending on the age and the classroom teacher, I do one of 2 things.  I have the students bring their backpacks to art and we pack up the 2D pieces.  With some goups, the teacher prefers to hand out the art and put it in a folder that they're sending home.  The 3D pieces I send with them back to their classroom and wish them good luck ..LOL JK.  They are usually pretty proud of their peice and we talk about how to get it home safely so their family can see the artist they are.
                Good luck,  :)
                Dave


                From: aliteachesart <abenton@potsdam. k12.ny.us>
                To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Mon, May 17, 2010 2:20:20 PM
                Subject: [art_education] Re: taking artwork home

                 
                Hi Laura,

                I have each table keep their flat work in their table "portfolio"- a 12X18 paper folded in half w/ their names on the front. They are color coded and this makes it so easy to pass back work. They take work home around each report card, keeping a few of the best in the portfolio until after art show selection. When work goes home I have them make "an art taco" folding it into a U shape, with the largest on the outside. They hold the art taco next to their tummies and put it in their backpacks to go home without creases. 3d work goes home in their hands on the bus. I tell them to hold it like a hamster with two hands gently so they don't squish it, yet firmly so it doesn't wiggle away. Some things still break, but not as many as when I used to wrap them and then they'd get knocked around in their backpacks on the bus. Hope this helps, it works for me! Ali k-4

                --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "laura_tierney" <laura_tierney@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home?
                > I have problems with them getting their 2D work home. I can't imagine what would become of 3D work. I work in a Title 1 elementary school.
                > Thanks
                > Laura
                >





              • Cheryl Hancock
                I forgot in my previous posting that the folders I make are stores in large plastic tubs on roller, and with lids stacked on each other. They are big enough
                Message 7 of 10 , May 18, 2010

                   I forgot in my previous posting that the folders I make are stores in large plastic tubs on roller, and with lids stacked on each other.   They are big enough to hold a whole years art work and is already for the end of year exhibition. Where i display at least 4 or 4 pieces per student,. Yes I have similar issues with my older students ( 13 year olds) who dont care to take home their work. One thing I do find is for their final year at the school I have the student create a canvas about 12-15 inches square. I photograph the students and turn their portraits into warhol style black and white images. This can be trying as some just dont like their faces at this stage . I often shoot some kids 4- 6 times to get the right lighting etc. We then either create stencil from this and apply the  black paint to the canvas Warhol style or I just photocopy the image and we decoupage it to the canvas. In the background last year I directed the students to the myriad of graffitti or fancy fonts. They then made stencils of their names and filled in the backgrounds.  Along the edge of the canvas they sign it and have friends do the same. It is their graduation project and final assessment. Not one student fails to take home this project as they really love it. I might consider using a Keith Haring style background this year. Canvases cost around $2- 3  and as it is part of my budget. They go on display during their graduation ceremony.
                  At present I have been having issues with students in this year grouping motivating  some of them to just finish work for half year reporting. I think I might get Chihuly Scultptures done using the plastic bottles. . 
                  I do  know that clay projects such as dragons a very engaging as well.
                  Cheryl H
                  Beeliar Primary School



                  On Tue, May 18, 2010 at 12:36 PM, MARYANN KOHL <maryann@...> wrote:
                   

                  Depending on the age, one issue is that many kids love the exploration and the activity, but they don't really care that much about the finished product. If you encourage a process of discovery, sometimes that is all they love and adore, not how it looks. So that's one thing. Another is that parents and families are so busy and there is really no where to put stuff, and so, bringing things home is very anti climatic and often things are ignored and tossed out anyway. I think they save themselves the trouble. Plus some kids get teased on the bus if they are carrying their projects. So on and on... you might ask them why they toss their stuff. Sounds like you have a handle of some of the reasons...



                  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
                  MaryAnn Kohl




                  On May 17, 2010, at 6:46 PM, Kelli Wilke wrote:


                  I have somewhat of a different problem.  I have a problem with kids not wanting to take their artwork home.  I find it stuffed in trash cans throughout the school.  It's very disheartening, even after I tell them how important it is to take home to show their families.  Unfortunately some kids have families members who couldn't care less about their work and they probably don't want to deal with that rejection.  So sad.  One way I deal with 3-D artwork is to let them take it back to their last period class (I have middle school) and then they can take it home from there.  I don't let them stuff it in their lockers.
                   
                  Kelli in NE

                  --- On Mon, 5/17/10, Dave Hoffmann <djustdave2002@...> wrote:

                  From: Dave Hoffmann <djustdave2002@...>
                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: taking artwork home
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, May 17, 2010, 3:00 PM

                   
                  Hi Laura,
                       Depending on the age and the classroom teacher, I do one of 2 things.  I have the students bring their backpacks to art and we pack up the 2D pieces.  With some goups, the teacher prefers to hand out the art and put it in a folder that they're sending home.  The 3D pieces I send with them back to their classroom and wish them good luck ..LOL JK.  They are usually pretty proud of their peice and we talk about how to get it home safely so their family can see the artist they are.
                  Good luck,  :)
                  Dave


                  From: aliteachesart <abenton@potsdam. k12.ny.us>
                  To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Mon, May 17, 2010 2:20:20 PM
                  Subject: [art_education] Re: taking artwork home

                   
                  Hi Laura,

                  I have each table keep their flat work in their table "portfolio"- a 12X18 paper folded in half w/ their names on the front. They are color coded and this makes it so easy to pass back work. They take work home around each report card, keeping a few of the best in the portfolio until after art show selection. When work goes home I have them make "an art taco" folding it into a U shape, with the largest on the outside. They hold the art taco next to their tummies and put it in their backpacks to go home without creases. 3d work goes home in their hands on the bus. I tell them to hold it like a hamster with two hands gently so they don't squish it, yet firmly so it doesn't wiggle away. Some things still break, but not as many as when I used to wrap them and then they'd get knocked around in their backpacks on the bus. Hope this helps, it works for me! Ali k-4

                  --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "laura_tierney" <laura_tierney@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the stuff home?
                  > I have problems with them getting their 2D work home. I can't imagine what would become of 3D work. I work in a Title 1 elementary school.
                  > Thanks
                  > Laura
                  >








                  --
                  Cheryl Hancock
                  Cooper, Dior and Charisma
                  Perth Australia
                • Byrd1956
                  Some of my junior high students want to take their work home and others would rather throw it away. I have a contract for the parents and one for the students
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 22, 2010
                    Some of my junior high students want to take their work home and others would rather throw it away. I have a contract for the parents and one for the students that they sign at the beginning of the year. They know if they do not take their work home they will be lowering their art grade by a letter. If work is found after school is out, I make a phone call and someone comes and gets the work. I have always told the students what they do with their work at home is up to them. Most of my students are excited to take their work home and display it. I have had parents say they have framed the work to hang in their home.
                  • Denise Pannell
                    This response is waaay late, but I had to share something that works for me. I send home a request before Christmas for the students to bring in gift bags and
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 7, 2010
                      This response is waaay late, but I had to share something that works for me. I send home a request before Christmas for the students to bring in gift bags and tissue paper left over from the holidays. If I offer a freezer pop (only costs a few cents) per bag full, I usually get more than enough to wrap all 550 clay projects we create during the school year. Projects are wrapped in tissue paper (or left over paper toweling saved by the custodians) and placed in the bag with some packing peanuts on the bottom as a cushion.

                      I remind them that their bags contain a fragile piece of art and they should treat it as though it is a baby bird. I have only had a few broken projects with this method and it is usually because they were swinging their bag around on the bus or unwrapped it before they got it home.

                      Denise Pannell
                      http://mrspicassosartroom.blogspot.com/


                      > I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers
                      > handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the
                      > stuff home?
                    • Cheryl Hancock
                      Denise that sounds like an excellent Idea - I have also reconsidered the way I make folders each year with the students. With the cost of the paper - I
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 8, 2010
                        Denise that sounds like an excellent Idea - I have also reconsidered the way I make folders each year with the students. With the cost of the paper - I investigated purchasing biodegradable plastic gift bags which work out at less than the white paper I use for the folders-
                         They have handles and I save newspapers and bubble wrap as well for the wrapping.
                        PS love your Blog - have just got mine up and running after promising to do so for ages
                        Cheryl Hancock
                        Perth Australia
                        OZ KIDZ ARTZ


                        On Thu, Jul 8, 2010 at 1:13 PM, Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@...> wrote:
                         

                        This response is waaay late, but I had to share something that works for me. I send home a request before Christmas for the students to bring in gift bags and tissue paper left over from the holidays. If I offer a freezer pop (only costs a few cents) per bag full, I usually get more than enough to wrap all 550 clay projects we create during the school year. Projects are wrapped in tissue paper (or left over paper toweling saved by the custodians) and placed in the bag with some packing peanuts on the bottom as a cushion.

                        I remind them that their bags contain a fragile piece of art and they should treat it as though it is a baby bird. I have only had a few broken projects with this method and it is usually because they were swinging their bag around on the bus or unwrapped it before they got it home.

                        Denise Pannell
                        http://mrspicassosartroom.blogspot.com/

                        > I am a new art teacher and so I haven't seen how other teachers
                        > handle this. Wondering, if you do 3D work how do students take the
                        > stuff home?




                        --
                        Cheryl Hancock
                        Perth Australia
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