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Re: [art_education] Chihuly faux glass art project

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  • Cheryl Hancock
    First of all I would do it outside with plenty of air movement. The other plan was done with Shrinky Dinks there was a lesson plan on
    Message 1 of 10 , May 3, 2010
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      First of all I would do it outside with plenty of air movement. The other plan was done with Shrinky Dinks there was a lesson plan on 


      I did a search using Chilhuly sculpture lesson and these were two of the first lesson that came up.

      Good luck. I wa also want to have a go at this my self - I just need to get the materials like this in Australia if possible. I am also going to try laminating sheets ie run them through the laminator first and then try a heat gun to shape.
      Cheers Cheryl Hancock
      Perth Australia

      On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 5:41 AM, MarciaB <marciadotcom@...> wrote:
       

      So I saw in an art teacher magazine about a collaborative project that looks like a Chihuly glass sculpture, but uses melted plastic water bottles. The steps say to heat the plastic with a heat gun and then shape the plastic. Later, you paint the plastic and let dry. Then, you assemble all the kids' pieces into one large sculpture. The project looks gorgeous! So I tried to melt the water bottles and I started feeling nauseous from the fumes. I don't think I could do it for a whole class of kids. Does anyone have any other ideas to make a faux-glass sculpture without risking my health?




      --
      Cheryl Hancock
      Cooper, Dior and Charisma
      Perth Australia
    • MarciaB
      Thanks for the ideas! I did a google search last night too and found the water bottles with the bent back flower petals. I think we are going to try that one.
      Message 2 of 10 , May 4, 2010
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        Thanks for the ideas! I did a google search last night too and found the water bottles with the bent back flower petals. I think we are going to try that one.

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Cheryl Hancock <hancock.ca@...> wrote:
        >
        > First of all I would do it outside with plenty of air movement. The other
        > plan was done with Shrinky Dinks there was a lesson plan on
        > http://marymaking.blogspot.com/2010/02/dale-chihuly-inspired-sculpture.html
        > <http://marymaking.blogspot.com/2010/02/dale-chihuly-inspired-sculpture.html>
        > http://cdn.dickblick.com/lessonplans/classroom-chihuly/classroom-chihuly-chihuly.pdf
        >
        >
        > <http://cdn.dickblick.com/lessonplans/classroom-chihuly/classroom-chihuly-chihuly.pdf>I
        > did a search using Chilhuly sculpture lesson and these were two of the first
        > lesson that came up.
        >
        > Good luck. I wa also want to have a go at this my self - I just need to get
        > the materials like this in Australia if possible. I am also going to try
        > laminating sheets ie run them through the laminator first and then try a
        > heat gun to shape.
        > Cheers Cheryl Hancock
        > Perth Australia
        >
        > On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 5:41 AM, MarciaB <marciadotcom@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > So I saw in an art teacher magazine about a collaborative project that
        > > looks like a Chihuly glass sculpture, but uses melted plastic water bottles.
        > > The steps say to heat the plastic with a heat gun and then shape the
        > > plastic. Later, you paint the plastic and let dry. Then, you assemble all
        > > the kids' pieces into one large sculpture. The project looks gorgeous! So I
        > > tried to melt the water bottles and I started feeling nauseous from the
        > > fumes. I don't think I could do it for a whole class of kids. Does anyone
        > > have any other ideas to make a faux-glass sculpture without risking my
        > > health?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Cheryl Hancock
        > Cooper, Dior and Charisma
        > Perth Australia
        >
      • Chezza
        The May 2007 Arts and activities magazine also had an article on this. So does the may 2010 edition ( available online in digital) As I am in Australia , they
        Message 3 of 10 , May 4, 2010
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          The May 2007 Arts and activities magazine also had an article on this. So does the may 2010 edition ( available online in digital) As I am in Australia , they dont send back issues to us. Is any one able to scan and email me a copy of those pages in the 2007 may edition.
          Cheryl H.
          Perth Australia
          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "MarciaB" <marciadotcom@...> wrote:
          >
          > So I saw in an art teacher magazine about a collaborative project that looks like a Chihuly glass sculpture, but uses melted plastic water bottles. The steps say to heat the plastic with a heat gun and then shape the plastic. Later, you paint the plastic and let dry. Then, you assemble all the kids' pieces into one large sculpture. The project looks gorgeous! So I tried to melt the water bottles and I started feeling nauseous from the fumes. I don't think I could do it for a whole class of kids. Does anyone have any other ideas to make a faux-glass sculpture without risking my health?
          >
        • James Cipalla
          I do a project where we use small pieces of tissue paper and watered down glue - we turn large bowls upside down , cover them with plastic (saran wrap), then
          Message 4 of 10 , May 4, 2010
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            I do a project where we use small pieces of tissue paper and watered down glue - we turn large bowls upside down , cover them with plastic (saran wrap), then "paint" them with the watered down glue and pieces of tissue paper - just a thin layer works well and the bleeding tissue paper works best. When they dry they pop right off and look very much like glass - they can be trimmed and added too as well.



            Namaste,

            Jim Cipalla

            Art Teacher,
            North side Middle School
            Norfolk,Virginia
            JCipalla@...

            Art is made of love,heart,creation and feelings, you go deep inside to find an artist of beautiful creation. A creation from an artist isn't just a drawing, or a painting but a feeling or a thing that lives inside. Art is creations from people's hearts. Art brings out personality and love. Art is the feeling of Joy.
            = A.B. = One of my wonderful Sixth grade students.




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          • Cheryl Hancock
            I did my experiment this week using laminating sheets and a heat gun ( my hair dryer was too cool). I tore up pieces of painted tissue paper left over from
            Message 5 of 10 , May 11, 2010
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              I did my experiment this week using laminating sheets and a heat gun ( my hair dryer  was too cool). I tore up pieces of painted tissue paper left over from Eric Carle activity  and placed them in a laminating pouch. I ran it through the laminator . I then cut out a circular flower sort of shape . I then pinched it together in the centre to start forming up a flower shape. Using a pair of BBQ tongs held it and applied the heat.. I got the effect I wanted at a very cheap price.
              Warning - heat gun quite hot - not for kids to operate - not too smelly-
              I could imagine enclosing very fine wire or gold thread in a circular spiral pattern along with torn spirals of paper etc in the laminating pouch. Will send images when back at work next week and have completed some more experiments.
              Cheryl H
              Visual Arts Specialist
              Beeliar Primary School
              Perth Australia
               
               
               
              On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 5:41 AM, MarciaB <marciadotcom@...> wrote:
               

              So I saw in an art teacher magazine about a collaborative project that looks like a Chihuly glass sculpture, but uses melted plastic water bottles. The steps say to heat the plastic with a heat gun and then shape the plastic. Later, you paint the plastic and let dry. Then, you assemble all the kids' pieces into one large sculpture. The project looks gorgeous! So I tried to melt the water bottles and I started feeling nauseous from the fumes. I don't think I could do it for a whole class of kids. Does anyone have any other ideas to make a faux-glass sculpture without risking my health?




              --
              Cheryl Hancock
              Cooper, Dior and Charisma
              Perth Australia
            • aliteachesart
              I did some experiments too- I took water bottles (the plastic kind made with corn is easier to cut) and cut them like sea weed or anemones and painted them
              Message 6 of 10 , May 11, 2010
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                I did some experiments too-

                I took water bottles (the plastic kind made with corn is easier to cut) and cut them like sea weed or anemones and painted them with acrylic paint mixed with mod podge. When they dried the paint was translucent, like glass paint. It was quite stinky, so I might mix the paint with gel medium instead. I'm going to make a group instillation with first graders. We're also going to paint apple sauce and pudding cups, and paint on clear laminated scraps then cut out spirals. Ali k-4, who is loving the inspiration of this group :)


                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Cheryl Hancock <hancock.ca@...> wrote:
                >
                > I did my experiment this week using laminating sheets and a heat gun ( my
                > hair dryer was too cool). I tore up pieces of painted tissue paper left
                > over from Eric Carle activity and placed them in a laminating pouch. I ran
                > it through the laminator . I then cut out a circular flower sort of shape .
                > I then pinched it together in the centre to start forming up a flower shape.
                > Using a pair of BBQ tongs held it and applied the heat.. I got the effect I
                > wanted at a very cheap price.
                > Warning - heat gun quite hot - not for kids to operate - not too smelly-
                > I could imagine enclosing very fine wire or gold thread in a circular spiral
                > pattern along with torn spirals of paper etc in the laminating pouch. Will
                > send images when back at work next week and have completed some more
                > experiments.
                > Cheryl H
                > Visual Arts Specialist
                > Beeliar Primary School
                > Perth Australia
                >
                >
                >
                > On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 5:41 AM, MarciaB <marciadotcom@...> wrote:
                >
                > >
                > >
                > > So I saw in an art teacher magazine about a collaborative project that
                > > looks like a Chihuly glass sculpture, but uses melted plastic water bottles.
                > > The steps say to heat the plastic with a heat gun and then shape the
                > > plastic. Later, you paint the plastic and let dry. Then, you assemble all
                > > the kids' pieces into one large sculpture. The project looks gorgeous! So I
                > > tried to melt the water bottles and I started feeling nauseous from the
                > > fumes. I don't think I could do it for a whole class of kids. Does anyone
                > > have any other ideas to make a faux-glass sculpture without risking my
                > > health?
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Cheryl Hancock
                > Cooper, Dior and Charisma
                > Perth Australia
                >
              • Cheryl Hancock
                I would like to know more about the plastic bottles made from corn _ I dont think we have them here in Australia . But may have something else that would be
                Message 7 of 10 , May 11, 2010
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                  I would like to know more about the plastic bottles made from corn  _ I dont think  we have them here in Australia  . But may have something else that would be easy for students to work with. It would be lovely if we could all share the photos over the next couple of weeks. I will get onto mine in the next week ( had car broken into last night and need to sort that out ( day off school) today. I am also away for the weekend.  I will get my student helper to experiment more on Thursday.

                  What a great project this .
                  Cheryl H
                  Beeliar Primary School
                  Perth Western Australia

                  On Wed, May 12, 2010 at 3:31 AM, aliteachesart <abenton@...> wrote:
                   

                  I did some experiments too-

                  I took water bottles (the plastic kind made with corn is easier to cut) and cut them like sea weed or anemones and painted them with acrylic paint mixed with mod podge. When they dried the paint was translucent, like glass paint. It was quite stinky, so I might mix the paint with gel medium instead. I'm going to make a group instillation with first graders. We're also going to paint apple sauce and pudding cups, and paint on clear laminated scraps then cut out spirals. Ali k-4, who is loving the inspiration of this group :)



                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Cheryl Hancock <hancock.ca@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I did my experiment this week using laminating sheets and a heat gun ( my
                  > hair dryer was too cool). I tore up pieces of painted tissue paper left
                  > over from Eric Carle activity and placed them in a laminating pouch. I ran
                  > it through the laminator . I then cut out a circular flower sort of shape .
                  > I then pinched it together in the centre to start forming up a flower shape.
                  > Using a pair of BBQ tongs held it and applied the heat.. I got the effect I
                  > wanted at a very cheap price.
                  > Warning - heat gun quite hot - not for kids to operate - not too smelly-
                  > I could imagine enclosing very fine wire or gold thread in a circular spiral
                  > pattern along with torn spirals of paper etc in the laminating pouch. Will
                  > send images when back at work next week and have completed some more
                  > experiments.
                  > Cheryl H
                  > Visual Arts Specialist
                  > Beeliar Primary School
                  > Perth Australia
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 5:41 AM, MarciaB <marciadotcom@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > So I saw in an art teacher magazine about a collaborative project that
                  > > looks like a Chihuly glass sculpture, but uses melted plastic water bottles.
                  > > The steps say to heat the plastic with a heat gun and then shape the
                  > > plastic. Later, you paint the plastic and let dry. Then, you assemble all
                  > > the kids' pieces into one large sculpture. The project looks gorgeous! So I
                  > > tried to melt the water bottles and I started feeling nauseous from the
                  > > fumes. I don't think I could do it for a whole class of kids. Does anyone
                  > > have any other ideas to make a faux-glass sculpture without risking my
                  > > health?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Cheryl Hancock
                  > Cooper, Dior and Charisma
                  > Perth Australia
                  >




                  --
                  Cheryl Hancock
                  Cooper, Dior and Charisma
                  Perth Australia
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