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Hi all art teachers- surfing the net and I found this great artist

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  • Chezza
    http://triglia.free.fr/ He is French and the blog is in french but it can be translated if using Google Chrome. Very inspirational for teaching to kids of
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 2, 2010
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      http://triglia.free.fr/ He is French and the blog is in french but it can be translated if using Google Chrome. Very inspirational for teaching to kids of all ages
      Cheryl H
      Perth Australia
    • Brandy
      His art reminds me a lot of Kenny Scharf s works. Playful, colorful, but created with tight compositions. Scharf s newest images use a lot of graphic screen
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 4, 2010
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        His art reminds me a lot of Kenny Scharf's works. Playful, colorful, but created with tight compositions. Scharf's newest images use a lot of graphic screen printing, which is a cool combination.
        http://www.paulkasmingallery.com/artists/kenny-scharf/selected-works/
        thanks for sharing,
        Brandy

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Chezza" <hancock.ca@...> wrote:
        >
        > http://triglia.free.fr/ He is French and the blog is in french but it can be translated if using Google Chrome. Very inspirational for teaching to kids of all ages
        > Cheryl H
        > Perth Australia
        >
      • artsypffartsy
        Hi, My fifth graders are making progress on their animation unit. I wanted to tell you about an armature material that is working really well for us. If you
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 5, 2010
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          Hi,
          My fifth graders are making progress on their animation unit. I wanted to tell you about an armature material that is working really well for us. If you have created a clay character before, you know the issue with them toppling over if they are top heavy. The books I read suggested making the feet/legs solid (with a piece of wire running through them) but making the bodies and heads, etc. of styrofoam and coating with a layer of clay after you mold the shape from the styrofoam. That being said, I was shopping the dollar store recently and fixated on plastic hair rollers as body/trunk armatures. They work great! You can even tie wire to them for the arms. We just pressed clay into the molded plastic part a bit to make them secure. They are practically weightless and are serving their purpose very well. Just wanted to pass this on. We'll put their finished animations on our website towards the end of May, I HOPE! But they have stuck to their schedule, coming to tutorials if need be to stay on track. The race is on to the finish. Photographing them starts this week.
          Linda
        • Kathleen Maledon
          have you put them in the kiln yet? k
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 5, 2010
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            have you put them in the kiln yet?  k
            On Apr 5, 2010, at 5:05 AM, artsypffartsy wrote:

            Hi,
            My fifth graders are making progress on their animation unit. I wanted to tell you about an armature material that is working really well for us. If you have created a clay character before, you know the issue with them toppling over if they are top heavy. The books I read suggested making the feet/legs solid (with a piece of wire running through them) but making the bodies and heads, etc. of styrofoam and coating with a layer of clay after you mold the shape from the styrofoam. That being said, I was shopping the dollar store recently and fixated on plastic hair rollers as body/trunk armatures. They work great! You can even tie wire to them for the arms. We just pressed clay into the molded plastic part a bit to make them secure. They are practically weightless and are serving their purpose very well. Just wanted to pass this on. We'll put their finished animations on our website towards the end of May, I HOPE! But they have stuck to their schedule, coming to tutorials if need be to stay on track. The race is on to the finish. Photographing them starts this week. 
            Linda


          • artsypffartsy
            ... You only want to use plasticine clay that never hardens to make your clay animation characters. It comes in many bright colors as well as neutrals. They
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 6, 2010
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              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@...> wrote:
              >
              > have you put them in the kiln yet? k
              > On Apr 5, 2010, at 5:05 AM, artsypffartsy wrote:
              >
              You only want to use plasticine clay that never hardens to make your clay animation characters. It comes in many bright colors as well as neutrals. They do not need to be very large, as you can zoom in with your camera. "Claytoons" modeling clay is very good. I had to order it. Google for Claytoons clay if you do this. The reason you use non hardening clay is because you have to be able to move their arms and legs, and turn their heads. We made their heads with either a styrofoam core or an aluminum foil core, imbedded a pretty long toothpick through their head and down into the styrofoam body core. We also made their arms separate on a long wire that imbeds into the styrofoam body core. We twisted wire to make it stronger. The hands and feet are built on a wire loop at the end of the twisted arm/leg wire. The feet are supposed to be the heaviest part. For good reason. Heavy feet keep the armature from tumbling over. We used small hair rollers, about 1/2 to 3/4 inch diameter, or we used styrofoam for the trunks of the bodies. Hope that makes sense. This is definitely a great adventure. Some kids think they can make their characters do ANYTHING for their first animation...reality bites for most of them. I do think I have a few genius types, though. We'll see. Making scenery is fun, too. Doll house furniture is fun to use.
            • icreatemore
              I didn t know what plasticine clay was so researched it and ran across this artist and techniques. I loved it and thought that you might too. CA
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 7, 2010
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                I didn't know what plasticine clay was so researched it and ran across this artist and techniques. I loved it and thought that you might too.
                CA

                http://www.barbarareid.ca/home.html

                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "artsypffartsy" <lindwood@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kathleen Maledon <kmaledon@> wrote:
                > >
                > > have you put them in the kiln yet? k
                > > On Apr 5, 2010, at 5:05 AM, artsypffartsy wrote:
                > >
                > You only want to use plasticine clay that never hardens to make your clay animation characters. It comes in many bright colors as well as neutrals. They do not need to be very large, as you can zoom in with your camera. "Claytoons" modeling clay is very good. I had to order it. Google for Claytoons clay if you do this. The reason you use non hardening clay is because you have to be able to move their arms and legs, and turn their heads. We made their heads with either a styrofoam core or an aluminum foil core, imbedded a pretty long toothpick through their head and down into the styrofoam body core. We also made their arms separate on a long wire that imbeds into the styrofoam body core. We twisted wire to make it stronger. The hands and feet are built on a wire loop at the end of the twisted arm/leg wire. The feet are supposed to be the heaviest part. For good reason. Heavy feet keep the armature from tumbling over. We used small hair rollers, about 1/2 to 3/4 inch diameter, or we used styrofoam for the trunks of the bodies. Hope that makes sense. This is definitely a great adventure. Some kids think they can make their characters do ANYTHING for their first animation...reality bites for most of them. I do think I have a few genius types, though. We'll see. Making scenery is fun, too. Doll house furniture is fun to use.
                >
              • artsypffartsy
                What a great link in Barbara Reid s site! Wow. Now THAT is a kind of illustration that I would LOVE to do. I would like to do it with kids, too. Sure would
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 8, 2010
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                  What a great link in Barbara Reid's site! Wow. Now THAT is a kind of illustration that I would LOVE to do. I would like to do it with kids, too. Sure would be pricey, though, to do it with 60 kids. They would have to be pretty small. Wonderful site. There is another book, called "The New Baby Calf" that I have used before. I am running late for school as I write this. I wonder if that one is her work, too. Probably. It's adorable, and I have used it before, even to inspire cut paper work for a farm mural.
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