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Re: [art_education] Abstract/ Non-Objective Foam Core Sculpture Help

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  • Cheryl Hancock
    Have a look at this lesson which I found somewhere on the internet ( sorry I cant remember where I found this or acknowledge ) Cheryl H Perth Australia On Wed,
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 10, 2010
    Have a look at this lesson which I found somewhere on the internet ( sorry I cant remember where I found this or acknowledge )
    Cheryl H
    Perth Australia



    On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 12:14 AM, Albatross Apparel <albatrossapparel@...> wrote:
     

    Hi everyone,

    I've been wanting to create a sculpture lesson with foam core or cardboard in an abstract/ non-objective manner, but i'm having trouble getting started. Does anyone have an example of a lesson plan that may fit this criteria, this way I have an idea of the direction I should take?

    Thank you




    --
    Cheryl Hancock
    Cooper, Dior and Charisma
    Perth Australia
  • Brandy
    This is how my kids did it when we created free form sculpture with foam core board. One thing, my kids found it difficult to paint after it was made. Even
    Message 2 of 7 , Mar 10, 2010
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      This is how my kids did it when we created free form sculpture with foam core board.
      One thing, my kids found it difficult to paint after it was made. Even spray paint didn't do a great job covering every nook and cranny. I thought to myself that what I would do differently for the next time is I would have the kids pick out pieces, kind of plan it out in their head, and paint them. Then after they were dry, I would have them construct the sculpture. If it were a nice day outside and you used acrylic or tempura, it would dry nearly immediately, and you could create them same day you painted them.
      I wanted to know from the kids if their first idea was exactly the same as the final product. How did it change? Henry Moore would be a great artist to attach to this kind of work because his later works were very abstract but he made hundreds of little "practice" pieces. Then he made dozens of larger pieces. He had a handful of bigger pieces with one final monumental piece being cast in bronze. I just loved the idea of his work concept. He didn't usually draw things out, he just made them and remade them to a more impressive scale. But the idea is, they all changed a little bit.
      Have fun,
      Brandy

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Marcy McGahan" <mmcgahan@...> wrote:
      >
      > I call it snip and slip construction. They cut a small slit into the
      > cardboard and take another piece of cardboard and slide it into that
      > slit, once you keep going, you have a sculpture, this is also good with
      > black Styrofoam.
      >
      > >>> "Albatross Apparel" 03/09/10 1:55 PM >>>
      > Hi everyone,
      >
      > I've been wanting to create a sculpture lesson with foam core or
      > cardboard in an abstract/ non-objective manner, but i'm having trouble
      > getting started. Does anyone have an example of a lesson plan that may
      > fit this criteria, this way I have an idea of the direction I should
      > take?
      >
      > Thank you
      >
    • aliteachesart
      If you do the snip and slip you could talk about Calder s Stabiles. ALI k-4
      Message 3 of 7 , Mar 10, 2010
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        If you do the "snip and slip" you could talk about Calder's Stabiles.
        ALI k-4
        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Brandy" <bergiemoore@...> wrote:
        >
        > This is how my kids did it when we created free form sculpture with foam core board.
        > One thing, my kids found it difficult to paint after it was made. Even spray paint didn't do a great job covering every nook and cranny. I thought to myself that what I would do differently for the next time is I would have the kids pick out pieces, kind of plan it out in their head, and paint them. Then after they were dry, I would have them construct the sculpture. If it were a nice day outside and you used acrylic or tempura, it would dry nearly immediately, and you could create them same day you painted them.
        > I wanted to know from the kids if their first idea was exactly the same as the final product. How did it change? Henry Moore would be a great artist to attach to this kind of work because his later works were very abstract but he made hundreds of little "practice" pieces. Then he made dozens of larger pieces. He had a handful of bigger pieces with one final monumental piece being cast in bronze. I just loved the idea of his work concept. He didn't usually draw things out, he just made them and remade them to a more impressive scale. But the idea is, they all changed a little bit.
        > Have fun,
        > Brandy
        >
        > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Marcy McGahan" <mmcgahan@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I call it snip and slip construction. They cut a small slit into the
        > > cardboard and take another piece of cardboard and slide it into that
        > > slit, once you keep going, you have a sculpture, this is also good with
        > > black Styrofoam.
        > >
        > > >>> "Albatross Apparel" 03/09/10 1:55 PM >>>
        > > Hi everyone,
        > >
        > > I've been wanting to create a sculpture lesson with foam core or
        > > cardboard in an abstract/ non-objective manner, but i'm having trouble
        > > getting started. Does anyone have an example of a lesson plan that may
        > > fit this criteria, this way I have an idea of the direction I should
        > > take?
        > >
        > > Thank you
        > >
        >
      • Kathleen Maledon
        how about doing dubuffet and using a tab and slot method of putting it together?
        Message 4 of 7 , Mar 10, 2010
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          how about doing dubuffet and using a tab and slot method of putting it together?
          On Mar 9, 2010, at 9:14 AM, Albatross Apparel wrote:

          Hi everyone,

          I've been wanting to create a sculpture lesson with foam core or cardboard in an abstract/ non-objective manner, but i'm having trouble getting started. Does anyone have an example of a lesson plan that may fit this criteria, this way I have an idea of the direction I should take?

          Thank you


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