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Re: art project for Auction

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  • MarciaB
    David, Thanks for the varnish tip. I will go buy that to try it. Thanks also for your project ideas! Marcia
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 27, 2010
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      David,
      Thanks for the varnish tip. I will go buy that to try it. Thanks also for your project ideas! Marcia

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "David Exner" <dexner@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello Marcia,
      > You may want to consider Minwax Indoor/Outdoor Helmsman Spar Urethane Clear or Satin Finish for the wood stools.  We use it on basswood boxes and plaques which have been carved, wood burned, painted or decorated with oil based colored pencils.  It always gives great results.  Remeber thin coats are ALWAYS better than thick coats of varnish.  Let dry between coats.  We give two "base coats", then lightly sand with fine or extra fine grade sandpaper and complete with a third THIN coat.  The projects great!
      > A possible group project could be taking a famous painting, such as Van Gogh's Sunflowers, grid into squares, which can be painted on a larger scale.  Dick Blick Art Materials sells 4"x4", 6"x6", 8"x8" and 12"x12" double primed canvas panels ranging in price from 40 cents to $1.54 each.  Your enlarged painting would be an assemblage of all squares.  The squares could be mounted onto MDO board, plywood or particleboard.
      > I hope these ideas help you.
      > Peace,
      > David ExnerWe make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
      > David G. Exner
      > Art Teacher & Art Club Co-Adviser
      > Community High School,District 94
      > WestChicago
      > (630)876-6407
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: "Marcia Beckett" <marciadotcom@...>
      > Sent 1/24/2010 1:04:37 PM
      > To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [art_education] art project for AuctionWe have an annual auction to benefit our school and the school would like to do some group art projects that we can auction off.  I teach K-6 and I'm looking for some really successful, easy to do large group project ideas.  I have a decent budget.  I was thinking about having a class decoupage/paint a wooden stool with acrylic paint and magazine pictures.   What would be the best material to seal it?   some sort of varnish, but I never know what kind of varnish would be best.  Another idea I had was to make a large group painting on a canvas.    Does anyone have any other really great ideas?  One year a club made a quilt to auction and that was wonderful, but I don't really have any quilting skills.  Or, do you have any good ideas for a large group painting that someone would want to hang in their house?  Thanks in advance!
      > Marcia
      > This email communication and its attachments, if any, may contain CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION WHICH MAY ALSO BE LEGALLY PRIVILEGED and is intended only for the use of the recipient(s) identified above. The unauthorized review, use, dissemination, distribution, downloading, or copying of this communication or any of its attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please immediately notify the listed sender by reply email, and delete and otherwise destroy all copies
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    • MarciaB
      I would like to try that silk painting. What age level did you do it with? Could younger kids make a successful silk painting? I ve never done it before.
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 27, 2010
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        I would like to try that silk painting. What age level did you do it with? Could younger kids make a successful silk painting? I've never done it before. I was looking at the hoops in the catalog. Are there hooks or something you could use to hang the finished pieces? How much did you sell them for? Were they auctioned or at a set price?

        Thanks!

        Marcia

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Brandy" <bergiemoore@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dick Blick's sells a silk painting kit for classrooms that is a very good idea for sales. They are beautiful, strongly colored silk hoops, and they give you enough paint to do quite a few more silk paintings on your own. I have gotten extra silks from Thai silks online. We made and gave some a dozen to help a homeless shelter's auction, and the ones we did on 8x54 sized silks sold very well and for quite a decent price:) They were only .90 a piece from the Thai silk Company.
        > Regards,
        > Brandy
        >
        > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "shellysart" <shellysart@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi Marcia,
        > >
        > > Last year was an auction year at our school so we just went through this too. Tis hard as there are 25 classes and everyone thinks they should come to the Art teacher for ideas.......I had never done an auction before, so was a huge learning experience for me. I can tell you which were the big sellers though...
        > > For 1st grade, the teachers bought a little kids table/chairs set (2 chairs) and mounted photos of each child in the class on it and then did a layer of lacquer over the top. Came out really cute and got some big money. The kindergarten parents did a concrete bench through a ceramics company that provided the bench/ bisque fired tiles and glazes. Each child painted a tile with parent help and the whole shebang went back to the company and they fired and mounted it (with grout and ALL) for a hundred bucks. Talk about cheap! That one got big dollars too. Another class, 3rd grade, did one of those decontruction drawings. They used Van Gogh's Starry night and had each child draw and color a square. Then reconstructed it on a background and took a group photo of the kids looking off into the back ground (the group photo was mounted in the fore ground) and pointing at the moon. It was done by the other Art teacher and came out beautiful. I thought that was a cool idea. Easy to do as well. Another teacher did a picture frame and had the kids photos mounted on it and the kids painted it. One parent donated a concrete bird bath and did ceramic tile mosaic. The kids got to add the ceramic pieces and then she grouted it. It too was gorgeous. Very time consuming and the kids really didn't do alot of the work. I did a wood bench. The good folks here on the group will remember that as they helped me trouble shoot it. I bought bisque ceramic tiles and the kids stamped their initials on them. We also did a rendering of the school mascot which is the Pacific NW native american Raven. I drew on the design and the kids painted the entire thing. Then we fired the tiles at school and they mounted them and grouted it. Man, I really blocked alot of this out.......it was a huge undertaking, but came out really neat. Didn't get as much money as I thought it was worth, but I think I was too attached to it at that point. I should have bought it! Hope this helps. I think there are books at the library and online for this very thing as so many schools do auctions now. That might have more ideas. Really though, the biggest money makers were not the Art projects but things like "spend the day with the principal" or "go bowling with your teacher" and such. Good Luck! Shelly in Seattle
        > >
        > > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Marcia Beckett <marciadotcom@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > We have an annual auction to benefit our school and the school would like to do some group art projects that we can auction off.  I teach K-6 .........
        > > >
        > > > Marcia
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Brandy
        The silk painting is best for 3-4th graders on the early side up to 12th grade. The hard part about it is putting on the silk resist, which is a non-wax
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 28, 2010
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          The silk painting is best for 3-4th graders on the early side up to 12th grade. The hard part about it is putting on the silk resist, which is a non-wax resist paint. It spreads a bit and my younger students, k-2nd grade, didn't get it and ended up with lots of with blobs because their resist "melted" together.
          As for selling, we did a mixture, selling some at set prices and others as an auction just because we thought it would be nice to have a minimum to donate to the organization, and I thought it worked well. People were generous, but frankly several of the silks were *really* gorgeous and for a hand painted work of wearable art, it was a still a good deal for them.

          The hoops don't have any thing attached to them that would make them hang, but the hoop itself is so light and has a lip that a flat head tack stuck and used as a "nail" for the hoop over hang would securely hold it up forever. You can also thread a small loop through the top and use them as sun catchers or use that loop to hold it to the wall.
          Experience tip here: the silk paint stains badly. ( as I put it in class, "it will be a permanent memory of the fun we had here today." :) If you place plastic, as I did one year, under them to prevent from staining, what happens is the paints run down the plastic and jump over the resist that you set up, and this creates undesirable effects on the piece. A beautiful blue sky near a red rose will be stained an ugly dark purple if that happens and it's hard to cover up mistakes because the resist areas will all be white, and any new resist can only be done on dry silk and won't be outlined in white like other parts. The hoops must be painted so that they are off the table- the hoop space/area is underneath, otherwise the silk paint will mostly be absorbed by what is underneath it and you will use twice as much silk paint as you need. My other tip is, I do recommend adding the resist to the image one day and painting them the next. The wet resist doesn't work as well, and can smear if the child runs into it.
          My kids are used to our projects taking the full 55 minutes, but this project, because the hoops are small and don't take much paint, only take 15, 20 minutes max, to paint. The larger silks, like the 8x54 can take longer obviously, but they only take about 30-40 minutes for most students.
          Washing tip: It would be must useful to have a small team of volunteers to help wash and iron the silks. You can leave the resist on the silks, no harm done, but they do look best when they are washed of the resist, especially on larger silk scarves. You can place the silk scarves- not the hoop silks, they will detach form their hoops and look a bit ragged- in the dryer on low heat for 30-40 minutes, or dry on delicate after it's completely dry.
          Once you start to wash the resist out, you can't stop, however well you ironed, or didn't iron, you just have to keep going until the resist is out. The paint will bleed and it scares some people at first to see how much paint appears to be coming out, but keep going! If you don't, the wet paint will drip around and look terrible. I placed them on old sheets and towels face down to absorb any water/paint mixtures coming off of them, the firts ones that i hung up all ended up with a very dripping paint look, that oddly, never washed out again- despite that I hadn't try to reiron them, the drippy paint look wouldn't come out.
          When this project works, it is incredible impressive, but I certainly ran into a learning curve trying to use them and get 100% consistency in outcome.
          Regards,
          Brandy

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "MarciaB" <marciadotcom@...> wrote:
          >
          > I would like to try that silk painting. What age level did you do it with? Could younger kids make a successful silk painting? I've never done it before. I was looking at the hoops in the catalog. Are there hooks or something you could use to hang the finished pieces? How much did you sell them for? Were they auctioned or at a set price?
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          > Marcia
          >
          > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Brandy" <bergiemoore@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Dick Blick's sells a silk painting kit for classrooms that is a very good idea for sales. They are beautiful, strongly colored silk hoops, and they give you enough paint to do quite a few more silk paintings on your own. I have gotten extra silks from Thai silks online. We made and gave some a dozen to help a homeless shelter's auction, and the ones we did on 8x54 sized silks sold very well and for quite a decent price:) They were only .90 a piece from the Thai silk Company.
          > > Regards,
          > > Brandy
          > >
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