Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Grade 1 Printmaking (or other) Ideas

Expand Messages
  • ednakate
    Last year, I volunteered to teach art for my twin boys First grade class. We did several printmaking lessons. We made Adinkra cloth using potato stamps that
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 3, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Last year, I volunteered to teach art for my twin boys First grade class. We did several printmaking lessons. We made Adinkra cloth using potato stamps that parents carved. (The teacher read the story the Talking Cloth before we did the lesson.) We also did object printing where I brought objects that would make interesting prints-potato mashers, craft sticks, spatulas, sponges, stamps, plastic animals, etc. We used spray bottles with watered down tempera where I had dye cuts that they placed on paper placemats and "spray painted". When the dye cuts are removed, they leave nice outlines-they used the mats for their holiday party. We used fingerprints to make bugs in a jar and flowers. In kindergarten, hand and foot prints were a big hit and they made ghosts, reindeer, menorahs, wreaths, flowers, giraffes, lions, trees, etc.
      Have fun!
      Alyssa
      San Diego




      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "kismet_c2" <sandra_c2@...> wrote:
      >
      > My daughters' teacher has asked me to do an art lesson (possibly printmaking) with her class, she is in grade one. I would appreciate any ideas (since I am a high school art teacher). I will be with the class for 1 1/2 hours.
      > thanks,
      > Sandra
      >
    • Lynn
      I do gadget printing, which is adaptable for all grades. I ve collected a variety of gadgets (hardware items...walk through a hardware store and it is
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 3, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I do "gadget" printing, which is adaptable for all grades.

        I've collected a variety of "gadgets" (hardware items...walk through a hardware store and it is amazing what you can discover, old bottle caps, cardboard cut to various lengths...corrugated cardboard has a great texture, toilet paper cores cut in half so you hace a nice curved line for printing, dowels, glue sticks, thread spools have some great design potential...and the list is as long as your imagination and your love of the hunt!)

        I use tempera paint, spread out, on paper or styrofoam plates. The tricky part is teaching the kids to get the right amount of paint on their "gadget." I show them how to practice the print on scratch paper before printing on their final project. Different "gadgets" require different amounts of paint. On this note, it is best to just let kids experiment at first. Have them walk around the room to see what other students have done. The kids need to know, however, that printing is unpredictable and that's what makes it fun and frustrating at the same time.

        I think I found one lesson I use through this site. Kids trace, or design their own, fish shape and then print with gadgets. At this point pattern ideas can be explored. I have had older kids do some amazing designs, but younger students are very capable of this as well. Great math connection...ABABAB, AABBAABB patterns ect. You can also do radial designs on square or round paper formats.

        Note: fish shape on 12 x 18 paper...cut shape out after printing. Black is dramatic but keep the paint colors light. Putting one or two paint colors at each table helps keep colors from getting muddy. Think analogous...yellow and orange, blue and purple.
        I may have some digital pics. If you are interested let me know.

        Hope this helps. Have fun!

        Lynn Whitehead
        Art Specialist
        Cedar Mill Elementary
        Portland, Oregon
      • Julie Casebourn
        I just did a printmaking lesson with 2nd grade today, but have also done this lesson with 1st grade in the past.  I learned it from art teacher Elizabeth
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 3, 2009
        • 0 Attachment

          I just did a printmaking lesson with 2nd grade today, but have also done this lesson with 1st grade in the past.  I learned it from art teacher Elizabeth Brown.  Ask local glass store to provide you with scrap glass and they might be willing to cut it for you too into squares or rectangle peices approx. 6x6 or 8x8ish.    I have a class cutter.. they aren't too expensive to buy.. you could cut the glass yourself if they can just donate it to you.  Hardware stores like Lowe's and Home Depot sometimes give me scraps too.

               Ok.. so after acquiring or cutting your glass into squares or rectangles.. tape the edges with masking tape.  YOU WILL NEED FOR YOUR CLASS: 

          one glass plate for each child,

          various markers (permanent are best),

          manila, white drawing paper or white typing paper, kids put name on their papers

          a spray bottle filled with water (for you to use or one per adult),

          one dry/one damp paper towel per child 

           

          You can direct the imagery how you would like so that it fits into your curriculum.  The basic mechanics of how to instruct: 

              Students draw images using markers directly onto clean glass plate, (hint:  put a piece of white or manila paper underneath so kids can see what they draw well). 

               You spray water onto manila or white paper and wipe off excess with your hand so paper is DAMP not dripping wet (practice a little so you know how much spraying to do and how much wiping off to do to get into the right groove so you don't spoil the print).  

               Lay damp paper directly over the drawing on glass plate.  Press down gently.. rub gently. 

               Pull print

               lay somewhere to dry

           

          Tips:  if image smears it was either too much water, or they moved the paper when they rubbed

                   if image prints off spotty... not enough water or not enough pressing and rubbing by kid

                   after initial print is dry.. kids can embellish..use paint, more marker, glitter paint pens etcc

                   You can mount on paper and make a card

           Extension:  use Crayola fabric crayons and draw on white paper.  Iron/transfer and print onto a piece of cloth.. I ask for old pillow cases from local motels and cut them apart to iron the kids' designs onto.  You can print more than one time from a drawing this way.. the print fades a tad with each printing/ironing, but you can teach pulling multiple prints.  VERY cheap way to teach a printing lesson. Colors from the fabric crayons look dull on paper but really brighten up when ironed onto fabric.  You can also do multiple prints from the glass, but you will need a master design under the glass from which the kids can trace.. their own original drawing.. then drawn.. printed.. redrawn reprinted and so on.  More work but they will get the idea of multiple or a series... always sneaking in that vocab. 

              


        • pent19
          I am having my kindergartners make their own wrapping paper for a present. I have cut up previous used lino-blocks. Students could experiment with color,
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 3, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            I am having my kindergartners make their own wrapping paper for a present. I have cut up previous used lino-blocks. Students could experiment with color, patterns and designs. It probably won't take too long, but it could be in addition to another project
            Michele
            >
          • kismet_c2
            I d like to thank everyone who sent ideas for my grade 1 lesson. I will go through each of them and already feel certain to find something that I will use. I
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 4, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              I'd like to thank everyone who sent ideas for my grade 1 lesson. I will go through each of them and already feel certain to find something that I will use. I really appreciate all of your suggestions.

              Thanks again,
              Sandra
            • Denise Pannell
              I was going to suggest Gadget Printing also. One of the best gadgets I have discovered is the plastic tube center of a tape register receipt roll. It makes
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 4, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                I was going to suggest Gadget Printing also. One of the best "gadgets" I have discovered is the plastic tube center of a tape register receipt roll. It makes the best starburst design! We use them for clay also.

                I have done a successful project with my first graders that involves folding and tearing a face (and all the facial features) and then gadget printing on top using black tempera. Great for introducing symmetry!

                You can see some examples in this Artsonia gallery for our school:
                Close up:
                http://www.artsonia.com/museum/art.asp?id=5342769&exhibit=187055&gallery=y

                This one shows the sunburst eyes made from the receipt tube:
                http://www.artsonia.com/museum/art.asp?id=1784371&exhibit=74180&gallery=y

                More examples:
                http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=74180&index=12

                Denise Pannell

                http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=36837

                > I do "gadget" printing, which is adaptable for all grades.
                > I've collected a variety of "gadgets" (hardware items...walk through
                > a hardware store and it is amazing what you can discover, old bottle
                > caps, cardboard cut to various lengths...corrugated cardboard has a
                > great texture, toilet paper cores cut in half so you hace a nice
                > curved line for printing, dowels, glue sticks, thread spools have
                > some great design potential...and the list is as long as your
                > imagination and your love of the hunt!)
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.