Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Rangoli art

Expand Messages
  • kamla ravikumar
    Hi, I could add a little more information to the Rangoli art that you have described.   The colorful kolam tradition dates back to the Indus Valley
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 28, 2009
    Hi,
    I could add a little more information to the Rangoli art that you have described.
     
    The colorful kolam tradition dates back to the Indus Valley Civilization (2500 B.C). Kolams were often drawn with coarse rice flour since it served as a food source to nature's creatures like ants and crows. Rice flour is seen as an offering to Lakshmi, the goddess of rice and wealth. The goddess has the power to attract prosperity and to prevent poverty from entering the home.
     
    There are many types of Rangolis:
     
    1) Done by using Rice flour powder and coloured powders.
    2) By soaking Rice grains for an hour and grinding it into a fine paste.You use the diluted paste either in a cone or a wet cloth to draw patterns on the floor
    3) Called POO-KOLAM - a rangoli made with fresh flowers ( in Kerala POO refers to a flower and Kolam is another word for Rangoli in South India).
     
    A Rangoli pattern varies with each occassion wehether it is Diwali ( the festival of lamps) or a wedding.It is normally done at the entrance of the house for a happy and auspicious ocassion only.
     
    I am attaching a few Rangoli images for you.
     
    Kamla
    Chennai,India.
     
     
     

  • Marcy McGahan
    Gorgeous attachments! Did your students create them or are they authentic designs outside someones home? Marcy ... [Attachment(s) ( #TopText ) from kamla
    Message 2 of 6 , Sep 28, 2009

      Gorgeous attachments! Did your students create them or are they authentic designs outside someones home?


      Marcy

      >>>kamla ravikumar <kamla_rk@...> 9/28/2009 9:24 AM >>>

       


      Hi,

      I could add a little more information to the Rangoli art that you have described.

       

      The colorful kolam tradition dates back to the Indus Valley Civilization (2500 B.C). Kolams were often drawn with coarse rice flour since it served as a food source to nature's creatures like ants and crows. Rice flour is seen as an offering to Lakshmi, the goddess of rice and wealth. The goddess has the power to attract prosperity and to prevent poverty from entering the home.

       

      There are many types of Rangolis:

       

      1) Done by using Rice flour powder and coloured powders.

      2) By soaking Rice grains for an hour and grinding it into a fine paste.You use the diluted paste either in a cone or a wet cloth to draw patterns on the floor

      3) Called POO-KOLAM - a rangoli made with fresh flowers ( in Kerala POO refers to a flower and Kolam is another word for Rangoli in South India).

       

      A Rangoli pattern varies with each occassion wehether it is Diwali ( the festival of lamps) or a wedding.It is normally done at the entrance of the house for a happy and auspicious ocassion only.

       

      I am attaching a few Rangoli images for you.

       

      Kamla

      Chennai,India.

       

       

       


    • becky
      Here is a slide show of a group making a Rangoli...kinda loose form. http://picasaweb.google.com/lisarayegarlock/LastNightAtFootprint#5364788 795371282034
      Message 3 of 6 , Oct 3, 2009
        Here is a slide show of a group making a Rangoli...kinda loose form.

        http://picasaweb.google.com/lisarayegarlock/LastNightAtFootprint#5364788795371282034 


          This was a group of Art Therapist doing an intern or a cultural exchange in India from the US. The blog is interesting as well for getting a taste of what they experienced in India.
        Starting with the first post.

        http://gwarttherapyindia.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2009-06-01T00%3A00%3A00%2B05%3A30&updated-max=2009-07-01T00%3A00%3A00%2B05%3A30&max-results=1

        The last post talks about making the Rangoli as a departing art collaborative.

        http://gwarttherapyindia.blogspot.com/

        "I leave you with one last image of connection in India: it is early evening on the rooftop terrace of our apartment, where 17 people are creating a rangoli/mandala drawing with colored chalk on the terracotta bricks. The image depicts important memories and connections from the trip. Each of us adding to each others' drawings until it covers the roof in colorful connecting swirls. In the background are the cacophonous honks of horns, the squawking of parrots and crows, and the wind in the palm and mimosa trees. When darkness falls, we gather in a circle and each light a candle stating what we intend to leave behind in India or what we have learned to let go of (i.e., fear, impatience, control), then share our thoughts of leaving and as each person blows out their candle to increasing darkness we state what we intend to take with us upon our return (i.e., courage, patience, appreciation of differences). The last person blows out their candle and we stand in the darkness with the vastness of India surrounding us. "


        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Brandy" <bergiemoore@...> wrote:
        >
        > A rangoli is a colorful design made on the floor near the entrance to a house in India to welcome guests.
        >      At Diwali, Hindus draw bright Rangoli patterns to encourage the goddess Lakshmi to enter their homes.
      • kamla ravikumar
        When darkness falls, we gather in a circle and each light a candle stating what we intend to leave behind in India or what we have learned to let go of (i.e.,
        Message 4 of 6 , Oct 4, 2009
          When darkness falls, we gather in a
          circle and each light a candle stating what we intend to leave behind in
          India or what we have learned to let go of (i.e., fear, impatience,
          control), then share our thoughts of leaving and as each person blows
          out their candle to increasing darkness we state what we intend to take
          with us upon our return (i.e., courage, patience, appreciation of
          differences) . The last person blows out their candle and we stand in the
          darkness with the vastness of India surrounding us. "
           
          I am so glad to read that the students / visitors found their visit to Chennai ,India a learning experience. in courage, patience, appreciation of differences.....through Rangoli art.
          If only we could all learn from such experiences and tolerate and respect diverse cultures ................the world would be such a peaceful pace.
           
          Kamla,
          Chennai,India
           
           

           

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.