Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

ART : AFRICAN AMERICAN : HISTORY: UNTIED STATES: Perceptions of Black: African American Visual Art and The Black Arts Movement

Expand Messages
  • David Dillard
    . ART : AFRICAN AMERICAN : HISTORY: UNTIED STATES: Perceptions of Black: African American Visual Art and The Black Arts Movement Perceptions of Black: African
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 7, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      .

      ART : AFRICAN AMERICAN : HISTORY: UNTIED STATES:
      Perceptions of Black: African American Visual Art
      and The Black Arts Movement



      Perceptions of Black: African American Visual Art
      and The Black Arts Movement
      <http://xroads.virginia.edu/~UG01/hughes/blackart.html>


      "Liberation is impossible if we fail to see ourselves in more positive
      terms. For without a change of vision, we are slaves to the oppressor's
      ideas and values --ideas and values that finally attack the very core of
      our existence. Therefore, we must see the world in terms of our own
      realities."

      Larry Neal, "Black Art and Black Liberation," 1969



      Conceived as the "aesthetic and spirtitual sister of the Black Power
      Concept," the Black Arts Movement (BAM) arose in the mid-1960s to develop
      a body of art that would provide "a change of vision" in the perception of
      African American identity. Like the New Negro Movement of the 1910s and
      1920s, BAM, spanning a period from the mid-1960s into the 1970s, was a
      flourishing of artistic endeavor among African American writers, poets,
      playwrights, musicians, and visual artists who believed that artistic
      production could be the key to revising stereotypes of African American
      inferiority and sub-humanity --stereotypes that lay at the heart of
      American racism. As African American writer James Baldwin noted in the
      1920s, "no people that has ever produced great literature and art has ever
      been looked [upon] as distinctly inferior." United in this belief, a
      number of African American artists sought to rekindle the efforts of their
      'New Negro' predecessors during the modern civil rights movement.

      Yet, despite the homage artists associated with BAM would pay to 'New
      Negro' writers like Langston Hughes or cultural theorists like Alain
      Locke, the "Black Power Concept" to which the artistic movement was
      aligned structured a departure from the agenda of African American artists
      of the early twentieth-century. Rather than creating artwork that would
      encourage white America to look upon African Americans more positively,
      BAM artists were exclusively intereseted in improving black Americans'
      perception of themselves. The call for Black Power, first issued as a
      challenge and later as a rejection of integrationist aims, arose in the
      mid-1960s with the belief that African Americans and black peoples living
      abroad would never be liberated from a racist society if they did not
      address internalized assumptions of inferiority.


      Continue Reading Here:

      <http://xroads.virginia.edu/~UG01/hughes/intro.html>


      Website Contents:


      Introduction
      Gallery Index
      Aesthetic Debate
      Timeline
      Bibliography


      Gallery Index
      <http://xroads.virginia.edu/~UG01/hughes/gall.html>


      Gallery 1: Protest and Propaganda

      Gallery 2: Re-presenting the Struggle

      Gallery 3: Self-Determined Black Identity

      Gallery 4: Distinctions of Black Culture: African Motifs and Musical
      Beats

      Gallery 5: "Mainstream" Productions: Black is a Color



      Bibliography
      <http://xroads.virginia.edu/~UG01/hughes/bib.html>


      Art and Cultural Histories
      Artist Biographies
      Sources for Aesthetic Debate
      Links



      Content Sample:


      Links


      African Americans in the Visual Arts
      Artcyclopedia
      Dictionary of Art

      <snip>



      Note: The links at the top of the screen for major sections of this
      website seem to be broken, use links at the bottom of the web page to
      navigate this site.


      Also of possible interest:


      ART
      http://tinyurl.com/kr9fe5

      ART EDUCATION
      http://tinyurl.com/nejwzg

      ART HISTORY
      http://tinyurl.com/kw342t

      ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
      http://tinyurl.com/ld84qz

      ARTS
      http://tinyurl.com/mfx7xe


      Sincerely,

      David Dillard

      Temple University

      (215) 204 - 4584

      jwne@...

      <http://daviddillard.businesscard2.com>

      Net-Gold

      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>  

      <http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html>

      <http://groups.google.com/group/net-gold?hl=en>

      <http://net-gold.jiglu.com/>

      General Internet & Print Resources

      http://guides.temple.edu/general-internet

      THE COLLEGE LEARNING CENTER

      http://tinyurl.com/lvnq36

      COUNTRIES

      <http://guides.temple.edu/general-country-info>

      EMPLOYMENT

      <http://guides.temple.edu/EMPLOYMENT>

      TOURISM

      <http://guides.temple.edu/tourism>

      DISABILITIES

      <http://guides.temple.edu/DISABILITIES>

      Educator-Gold

      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Educator-Gold/>

      K12ADMINLIFE

      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/K12AdminLIFE/>

      Nina Dillard's Photographs on Net-Gold

      Twitter: davidpdillard 



    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.