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Re: HIGH SCHOOL SCETCHBOOKS

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  • Terri Stokes
    SKETCHBOOKS ARE GREAT IN MY HIGH SCHOOL ART CLASSES:(I teach at a private all young men college prep school-grades 9 to 12).   At the beginning of the year
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 11, 2009
      SKETCHBOOKS ARE GREAT IN MY HIGH SCHOOL ART CLASSES:(I teach at a private all young men college prep school-grades 9 to 12). 
       At the beginning of the year in Art I, they are requested to buy a sketchbook and Ebony pencils I supply. They are taught about how a sketchbook can be a diary, as well as for drawing.The sketchbook is used throughout the semester many times . They are stored in a cabinet in the artroom , or students may come and go with their personal sketchbook if they should so desire. Many assignments are given for the sketchbook, for ex: contour drawing excercises, drawing hands, sports figures, the torso, side view portraits of each other, full face portraits, brainstorming ideas for various projects.
       They practice in the sketchbook,  then a refined drawing is turned in on quality drawing paper supplied by me. Explain to your students how artists through many centuries have used their sketchbook for practicing observing in nature and perfecting their eye/hand coordination (ex: Michaelangelo) honing in on drawing/observation skills, plus brainstorming design projects. I also tell my students that taking notes in other classes can often be helpful with a drawing pad, for those who think more visually. Well, this is a start. There is so much that can be done with a sketch book. Carry on Art Teacher's.... what other ideas can we share....HIGH SCHOOL ideas are welcomed!

      --- On Tue, 8/11/09, jfullertx <jfullertx@...> wrote:

      From: jfullertx <jfullertx@...>
      Subject: [art_education] Art I Sketchbooks - Do you use them?
      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, August 11, 2009, 10:54 PM

       
      I am planning my third year as a high school art teacher and one thing bothers me. My co-workers told me not to bother with sketchbooks - they're more trouble than they're worth - all you get is junk.
      So, I've never implemented the use of sketchbooks in my Art I classes.
      I am curious how many of you use sketchbooks and to what degree of success?


    • Leah Korican
      I stopped for a number of years, mostly due to space constraints, but started again and really like it. I have students use them for preparatory sketches,
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 11, 2009
        I stopped for a number of years, mostly due to space constraints, but started again and really like it. I have students use them for preparatory sketches, assignments like mapping the proportions of the face, writing reflections, also had them put their sketchbook in front of  a finished piece and have students rotate through and write comments, had them fill out self-evaluations and glue them in the book, and sketch outdoors to name just some. I think it is a really useful tool and I look forward to hearing what everyone else is doing with sketchbooks!

        leah



        .

      • icreatemore
        Personally, I think sketchbooks are monitory. They should have the artist s name, date and subject/lesson. This is a way young artist can see their
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 11, 2009
          Personally, I think sketchbooks are monitory. They should have the artist's name, date and subject/lesson. This is a way young artist can see their improvement...gain confidence. They also keep their class notes with their sketches and can use all of this on test.

          I teach middle school Art 1 and advanced art. It's an ongoing fight but one I'm up for. I do use 8 1/2 x 11 3 hole punched typing paper. I grade the sketchbook as a process and require their best weekly work be turned in to me and I keep that.
        • MaryJo Rosania-Harvie
          When I taught Art 1, 2 and other courses (now I teach photography) I did a daily sketch exercise. I taught on a block schedule, 84 minute blocks, so the first
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 11, 2009
            When I taught Art 1, 2 and other courses (now I teach photography) I did a daily sketch exercise. I taught on a block schedule, 84 minute blocks, so the first 10-20 minutes were for sketches. I gave topics each day - and sometimes materials. This was a great way to see if students were improving, and also a way for them to try new materials that we might not get to in a project.
            Even in my photo class I do a "daily sketchbook photo" - then we make books of photos - so I can teach different book making techniques. 
            I think sketch book are very valuable and add to the curriculum - I don't understand the thinking that all you get is "junk" -- sometimes I think students just need guidance so they know WHAT to do in a sketchbook.
            MaryJo 

            On Tue, Aug 11, 2009 at 8:51 PM, icreatemore <cay.icreate@...> wrote:
             

            Personally, I think sketchbooks are monitory. They should have the artist's name, date and subject/lesson. This is a way young artist can see their improvement...gain confidence. They also keep their class notes with their sketches and can use all of this on test.

            I teach middle school Art 1 and advanced art. It's an ongoing fight but one I'm up for. I do use 8 1/2 x 11 3 hole punched typing paper. I grade the sketchbook as a process and require their best weekly work be turned in to me and I keep that.




            --
            MaryJo Rosania-Harvie


          • Sue Stevens
            Hi all, I teach highschool visual arts, and I have been using sketchbooks with my students for years and years. Students are required to have a sketchbook - I
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 11, 2009
              Hi all,
              I teach highschool visual arts, and I have been using sketchbooks with my students for years and years.
              Students are required to have a sketchbook - I do include them in the art kit that I sell through the department (but they are not required to buy it) - students could use a duotang filled with computer paper if needed).   I never used to 'grade' the sketchbook, but I have started to do something along that line......
              Junior students (grade 9 and 10) get a top-coil, soft cover, 50 page sketchbook, good quality (not dollar store!)
              Senior students (grade 11 and 12) can either buy the junior sketchbook, or 'upgrade' to the hard cover, side-coil, 100 page sketchbook for $3 more - most do that - it's a really nice sketchbook!  Senior students who already have a larger sketchbook and have not filled it can continue using their old one, rather than buy a new one......
              I also sell the sketchbooks year-round, so serious art students usually get a second one.....and I have on occasion had students who have never taken an art course come and buy a sketchbook just becuase they like to draw in their spare time.....(cool!)......it helps too that there really is no where in town to buy a good sketchbook!
              Anyways - We do sketches in our books......preliminary work......brainstorming.......creativity exercises......and yes, note taking.  I encourage students to attach in any handout that we use - and I usually hand out things that are 1/2 of a computer page just for that purpose)....Also, on occasion, I sketch in MY sketchbook along with the students......first it shows the students that I too use a sketchbook, and also I can demonstrate certain skills without being so obvious......and it allows me to get to know the students a little more - a little less of me 'hovering' over the students......
              All for now -sue
            • debbie nicholas
              I believe sketchbooks are important for any student in any art class.   I have fought with my co-workers to keep them even though they claim they only cause
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 12, 2009
                I believe sketchbooks are important for any student in any art class.   I have fought with my co-workers to keep them even though they claim they only cause problems.  Yes I do get  a lot of junk but I also have students who are excited to get the sketchbooks and show me their sketches each week.  I have some who love looking back through the year of sketches and seeing their improvements.  For me that makes up for any problems they cause or junk I might get.  I give the Art 1 students a 50 page sketchbook and upper level 100 page.  The students take note and complete weekly assignments in the sketchbooks.
                 
                debbie nicholas

                --- On Tue, 8/11/09, jfullertx <jfullertx@...> wrote:

                From: jfullertx <jfullertx@...>
                Subject: [art_education] Art I Sketchbooks - Do you use them?
                To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, August 11, 2009, 5:54 PM

                 
                I am planning my third year as a high school art teacher and one thing bothers me. My co-workers told me not to bother with sketchbooks - they're more trouble than they're worth - all you get is junk.
                So, I've never implemented the use of sketchbooks in my Art I classes.
                I am curious how many of you use sketchbooks and to what degree of success?


              • helpertouch
                If you teach in a poor area and kids can t easily afford sketchbooks, as I do, you can use inexpensive (district-supplied, mostly) materials to make a pretty
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 12, 2009
                  If you teach in a poor area and kids can't easily afford sketchbooks, as I do, you can use inexpensive (district-supplied, mostly) materials to make a pretty great sketchbook.

                  Here is a link to my YouTube video (not great, but it shows the process):
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdCtBeA3LnI
                  Cathy Wilson
                • Yvette
                  Hi! Last year, Jr. Kindergarten through seventh grade had a sketchbook that stayed in art class. With 115 students it only took one large shelf to store. I
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 12, 2009
                    Hi! Last year, Jr. Kindergarten through seventh grade had a sketchbook that stayed in art class. With 115 students it only took one large shelf to store.

                    I was surprised at how well the sketchbooks worked for all grades - and even jr. kindergarten. The parents really appreciated the sketchbooks and many expressed praise for them.
                    I used the sketchbook throughout the year as a way to start the lesson or just get them settled into class. Usually we spent 5 to 10 minutes with our books - sometimes much longer. Many times we did a quick drawing (a step by step tutorial – some great ideas were found at http://www.drawspace.com/ and http://www.learn-to-draw.com/) and other times we were able to do our lesson of the day right in the book. For example, when studying Okeefe, we used chalks to sketch a pansy right in the book. At the end of March, we drew Eiffel towers right inside the books and then painted or did our 3-D ones later in class. We also used the sketchbooks to practice drawing still life and various scapes. Some days we had "draw anything you want" for ten minutes or we went outside for a setting. We also used sketchbooks to save little notes or info sheets that could be taped inside the sketchbook. For example, when studying masterpieces I usually give out a small sheet telling about the piece – that gets taped right in their book for future reference. Also, lesson sheets could be permanently stored in the book (like art criticism info, elements, etc.)
                    Pencil pressure, ruler use, and perspective lessons were perfect to do in the book. One first grade class (a small class that always had lots of time to explore a bit more) ended up getting their hands VERY messy with paint (I mean extra messy). Before they washed up, we opened up all the sketchbooks and each put in handprints and made pictures. Many times I wrote some comments and notes in student books – and this seemed to really edify. Or if it was a lesson that had a rubric, I would give a check or grade. Some days we left the sketchbooks on the shelf and devoted all of our time to the actual lesson. At the end of the year the students have a nice keepsake to take home and I wrote a goodbye note in each book (ouch, that took some time, but with 115 students it was doable). Also, we entered a local art show this last year and as the students decided what to submit, many went through their sketchbooks to find a piece they loved!
                    Some lessons I learned.
                    1. It is helpful if the sketchbooks are all the same size – and a good quality one is a must. We had 100 page books, but I think 50 sheets would have worked just fine. Spiral ones are the best.
                    2. It was easier to give everyone their own pencil(s) for the year- some made a pocket with tape and paper to keep their pencil right in their book. This may not sound like a big deal, but so many kids had pencil issues and by having them ready in their books – this helped.
                    3. I will try and color code the sketchbooks by grade so that no books will get lost on another shelf. Maybe use a ribbon or marker.
                    4. I would like to fine tune sketchbook lessons with more grade/age specific ideas.
                    5. I will have every lesson labeled. I can't recall where I found this, but on one art site it was suggested that every lesson in a sketchbook should start with making a small box in the lower right hand corner. Then the student writes the date, lesson title, and their name in this space.


                    HTH, Yvette in VA


                    --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "jfullertx" <jfullertx@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I am planning my third year as a high school art teacher and one thing bothers me. My co-workers told me not to bother with sketchbooks - they're more trouble than they're worth - all you get is junk.
                    > So, I've never implemented the use of sketchbooks in my Art I classes.
                    > I am curious how many of you use sketchbooks and to what degree of success?
                    >
                  • Holly Clement
                    I love this! I m getting such great ideas from you all about sketchbooks and procedures. I just cleared off an entire shelf, I think I ll have sketchbooks for
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 12, 2009
                      I love this! I'm getting such great ideas from you all about sketchbooks and procedures. I just cleared off an entire shelf, I think I'll have sketchbooks for everyone, K-12. I am going to go to get various colors of ducktape and put a different color on each classes spine. (I have the kids make sketchbooks in class, drawing paper, folded in half, depending on the age we either stitch the sides or a use a saddle stitcher to staple.) I will probably have high schools make hardbound books and do a book binding unit at the beginning of the year! I'm so pumped for this school year.

                      Holly Clement
                      West Nodaway
                      Art



                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: art_education@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Yvette
                      Sent: Wed 8/12/2009 2:07 PM
                      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [art_education] Re: Art I Sketchbooks - Do you use them?

                      Hi! Last year, Jr. Kindergarten through seventh grade had a sketchbook that stayed in art class. With 115 students it only took one large shelf to store.

                      I was surprised at how well the sketchbooks worked for all grades - and even jr. kindergarten. The parents really appreciated the sketchbooks and many expressed praise for them.
                      I used the sketchbook throughout the year as a way to start the lesson or just get them settled into class. Usually we spent 5 to 10 minutes with our books - sometimes much longer. Many times we did a quick drawing (a step by step tutorial - some great ideas were found at http://www.drawspace.com/ and http://www.learn-to-draw.com/) and other times we were able to do our lesson of the day right in the book. For example, when studying Okeefe, we used chalks to sketch a pansy right in the book. At the end of March, we drew Eiffel towers right inside the books and then painted or did our 3-D ones later in class. We also used the sketchbooks to practice drawing still life and various scapes. Some days we had "draw anything you want" for ten minutes or we went outside for a setting. We also used sketchbooks to save little notes or info sheets that could be taped inside the sketchbook. For example, when studying masterpieces I usually give out a small sheet telling about the piece - that gets taped right in their book for future reference. Also, lesson sheets could be permanently stored in the book (like art criticism info, elements, etc.)
                      Pencil pressure, ruler use, and perspective lessons were perfect to do in the book. One first grade class (a small class that always had lots of time to explore a bit more) ended up getting their hands VERY messy with paint (I mean extra messy). Before they washed up, we opened up all the sketchbooks and each put in handprints and made pictures. Many times I wrote some comments and notes in student books - and this seemed to really edify. Or if it was a lesson that had a rubric, I would give a check or grade. Some days we left the sketchbooks on the shelf and devoted all of our time to the actual lesson. At the end of the year the students have a nice keepsake to take home and I wrote a goodbye note in each book (ouch, that took some time, but with 115 students it was doable). Also, we entered a local art show this last year and as the students decided what to submit, many went through their sketchbooks to find a piece they loved!
                      Some lessons I learned.
                      1. It is helpful if the sketchbooks are all the same size - and a good quality one is a must. We had 100 page books, but I think 50 sheets would have worked just fine. Spiral ones are the best.
                      2. It was easier to give everyone their own pencil(s) for the year- some made a pocket with tape and paper to keep their pencil right in their book. This may not sound like a big deal, but so many kids had pencil issues and by having them ready in their books - this helped.
                      3. I will try and color code the sketchbooks by grade so that no books will get lost on another shelf. Maybe use a ribbon or marker.
                      4. I would like to fine tune sketchbook lessons with more grade/age specific ideas.
                      5. I will have every lesson labeled. I can't recall where I found this, but on one art site it was suggested that every lesson in a sketchbook should start with making a small box in the lower right hand corner. Then the student writes the date, lesson title, and their name in this space.


                      HTH, Yvette in VA


                      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "jfullertx" <jfullertx@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I am planning my third year as a high school art teacher and one thing bothers me. My co-workers told me not to bother with sketchbooks - they're more trouble than they're worth - all you get is junk.
                      > So, I've never implemented the use of sketchbooks in my Art I classes.
                      > I am curious how many of you use sketchbooks and to what degree of success?
                      >
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