Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Games?

Expand Messages
  • Sue Stevens
    Does anyone have any really cool art games to play on bus cancellation/snow days for highschool students? I have just been given Prestel s Art Game, but
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 5, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Does anyone have any really cool art games to play on bus cancellation/snow days for highschool students?
      I have just been given Prestel's Art Game, but haven't figured out how to play it yet....
      I have a MEMO set of art images from a museum, and the kids liked that.....
      I have an old game of Pictionary (but some of the words are a tad  inapproprate for students, or reference things they would have no idea of).....
      Sue
    • Kelli Wilke
      My kids LOVE Square Up .  Back when I was young it used to be called Rubik s race.  I found it in a catalog called Mindware (love that catalog).  They also
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 5, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        My kids LOVE "Square Up".  Back when I was young it used to be called Rubik's race.  I found it in a catalog called Mindware (love that catalog).  They also love to play Colorku, which is basically Sudoku but uses colored marbles on a wooden board instead of numbers.  Another game is called Color Scheme Game.  It's similar to connect four but you use primary colored tiles and you can change your opponents color on the board by placing another colored tile in front of it, making secondary colors.  They have to connect 4 of the same colored tiles to win.  Just a few suggestions....
         
        Kelli in NE

        --- On Wed, 8/5/09, Sue Stevens <suestevens@...> wrote:

        From: Sue Stevens <suestevens@...>
        Subject: [art_education] Games?
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 3:30 PM

         
        Does anyone have any really cool art games to play on bus cancellation/ snow days for highschool students?
        I have just been given Prestel's Art Game, but haven't figured out how to play it yet....
        I have a MEMO set of art images from a museum, and the kids liked that.....
        I have an old game of Pictionary (but some of the words are a tad  inapproprate for students, or reference things they would have no idea of).....
        Sue

      • Suzette Milam-Morrow
        Scrutineyes (I don t think it is being made now, so look on ebay). It is a high school level activity that promotes vocabulary in Language Arts Standards.
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 5, 2009
        • 0 Attachment

          Scrutineyes (I don’t think it is being made now, so look on ebay).

          It is a high school level activity that promotes vocabulary in Language Arts Standards. Great for last day before vacation reward.

          There are a huge number of fantastic painted images that all start with the same letter on one card 12x16”. I think there are 8 cards. I would have each table work as a group with one scribe. Use an egg timer for the groups to identify and list as many things as they can see. When the time is up move the card to the next group and go again. When everyone has had a chance to do all the cards, have the group add the totals. The group with most wins, but no one really cares. It’s just really fun.  Warning: On the “s” card there is a stripper that is dressed provocatively. I pulled that one out.

           

          Suzette Morrow

          www.Suzet.com

           

           

        • Brandy
          MODIGLIANI The Art Auction Game is a good art game. You can of course make the game go faster by giving out more of the art works to start with, but the idea
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            MODIGLIANI The Art Auction Game is a good art game. You can of course make the game go faster by giving out more of the art works to start with, but the idea is as an art collector you need to collect series of pieces by period or country. So you learn a lot while you play. It can take a VERY long time to play, starting as the rules state, with no art pieces at all.
            I also liked "the (authentic) DiVinci Dilemma" game. You learn about DiVinci and the Renaissance period. Both those games are high school appropriate, all the way through.
            On less of a budget, you could play surrealistic games, of which their are many found free on the online.
            Regards,
            Brandy



            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@...> wrote:
            >
            > Does anyone have any really cool art games to play on bus cancellation/snow days for highschool students?
            > I have just been given Prestel's Art Game, but haven't figured out how to play it yet....
            > I have a MEMO set of art images from a museum, and the kids liked that.....
            > I have an old game of Pictionary (but some of the words are a tad inapproprate for students, or reference things they would have no idea of).....
            > Sue
            >
          • wmvanhorn
            This summer I just made up my own Pictionary cards using art vocabulary. Just one word per card and the cards include the definition of the word (in most
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 7, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              This summer I just made up my own Pictionary cards using art vocabulary. Just one word per card and the cards include the definition of the word (in most cases). I just created a grid on MS Word and typed up 3 cards per page and will have them laminated. I haven't used it yet so I don't know how it will be received.

              I also have a REAL Pictionary game and thought to go through cards and weed out the inappropriate and too difficult cards.

              William


              >
              > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Does anyone have any really cool art games to play on bus cancellation/snow days for highschool students?
              > > I have just been given Prestel's Art Game, but haven't figured out how to play it yet....
              > > I have a MEMO set of art images from a museum, and the kids liked that.....
              > > I have an old game of Pictionary (but some of the words are a tad inapproprate for students, or reference things they would have no idea of).....
              > > Sue
              > >
              >
            • behop31
              I made some games for reviewing art vocabulary that my ninth grade students really like a lot. One is like a baseball game, and I pitch questions that are
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 8, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                I made some games for reviewing art vocabulary that my ninth grade students really like a lot. One is like a baseball game, and I "pitch" questions that are either "singles", "doubles" or "triples" based on difficulty. For instance, "Name the element of art that refers to a space enclosed by a line" (shape) would be a "single" question, so the student would be on first base (we actually had the room set up where the kids would cycle around so that their "team" would know when they needed a double or triple to get in as many runs as possible, but you can draw a diamond on the board or make a board on paper and have pieces to move).
                Another game I made was based on a game I saw online ("Will the Winners Lose?"). I made question cards and then point cards. Questions were based on stuff we had gone over in class (pretty much the same questions as "Baseball"... stuff about vocab and artists we had studied, as well as some Aesthetics questions and art criticism questions...). The Points cards is where it gets fun... some are positive, such as "Earn 50 (or 100, or 200, take 150 from the other team... whatever) Points" whereas some are negative, such as "Lose 50 (or whatever #) Points" or "Give 400 points to the Other Team." There are also "Lose a Turn" "point" cards... whatever you want. I had "Lose all your Points" and silly stuff, too. The kids never knew what the card would say. I give the option of NOT taking a point card, too. So it gets really intense, say, if a kid elects to not take a card and then the next team gets a great card... fun stuff!
                I also do "I Have... Who has?" where I make cards such as "Who has a principle of design that describes the way the artist arranges the elements in a work of art?" The student who has "Composition" would also have a "Who Has?" question on their card. Perhaps this sounds more confusing than it is, but it really is simple. Everyone has to pay attention because you never know if you have the answer. The first card has only an "I have.." portion and the last card only has an answer... I usually start and end the game.
                Hope that helps!

                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "wmvanhorn" <inmystudio@...> wrote:
                >
                > This summer I just made up my own Pictionary cards using art vocabulary. Just one word per card and the cards include the definition of the word (in most cases). I just created a grid on MS Word and typed up 3 cards per page and will have them laminated. I haven't used it yet so I don't know how it will be received.
                >
                > I also have a REAL Pictionary game and thought to go through cards and weed out the inappropriate and too difficult cards.
                >
                > William
                >
                >
                > >
                > > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Does anyone have any really cool art games to play on bus cancellation/snow days for highschool students?
                > > > I have just been given Prestel's Art Game, but haven't figured out how to play it yet....
                > > > I have a MEMO set of art images from a museum, and the kids liked that.....
                > > > I have an old game of Pictionary (but some of the words are a tad inapproprate for students, or reference things they would have no idea of).....
                > > > Sue
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • MJ Smith
                This is great!!! Thanks for sharing a great idea...   Jennifer An idea is salvation by imagination. Frank Lloyd Wright ... From: behop31
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 8, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  This is great!!! Thanks for sharing a great idea...  

                  Jennifer

                  "An idea is salvation by imagination."
                  Frank Lloyd Wright

                  --- On Sat, 8/8/09, behop31 <bhopkins@...> wrote:

                  From: behop31 <bhopkins@...>
                  Subject: [art_education] Re: Games?
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, August 8, 2009, 6:40 AM

                   

                  I made some games for reviewing art vocabulary that my ninth grade students really like a lot. One is like a baseball game, and I "pitch" questions that are either "singles", "doubles" or "triples" based on difficulty. For instance, "Name the element of art that refers to a space enclosed by a line" (shape) would be a "single" question, so the student would be on first base (we actually had the room set up where the kids would cycle around so that their "team" would know when they needed a double or triple to get in as many runs as possible, but you can draw a diamond on the board or make a board on paper and have pieces to move).
                  Another game I made was based on a game I saw online ("Will the Winners Lose?"). I made question cards and then point cards. Questions were based on stuff we had gone over in class (pretty much the same questions as "Baseball".. . stuff about vocab and artists we had studied, as well as some Aesthetics questions and art criticism questions... ). The Points cards is where it gets fun... some are positive, such as "Earn 50 (or 100, or 200, take 150 from the other team... whatever) Points" whereas some are negative, such as "Lose 50 (or whatever #) Points" or "Give 400 points to the Other Team." There are also "Lose a Turn" "point" cards... whatever you want. I had "Lose all your Points" and silly stuff, too. The kids never knew what the card would say. I give the option of NOT taking a point card, too. So it gets really intense, say, if a kid elects to not take a card and then the next team gets a great card... fun stuff!
                  I also do "I Have... Who has?" where I make cards such as "Who has a principle of design that describes the way the artist arranges the elements in a work of art?" The student who has "Composition" would also have a "Who Has?" question on their card. Perhaps this sounds more confusing than it is, but it really is simple. Everyone has to pay attention because you never know if you have the answer. The first card has only an "I have.." portion and the last card only has an answer... I usually start and end the game.
                  Hope that helps!

                  --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "wmvanhorn" <inmystudio@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > This summer I just made up my own Pictionary cards using art vocabulary. Just one word per card and the cards include the definition of the word (in most cases). I just created a grid on MS Word and typed up 3 cards per page and will have them laminated. I haven't used it yet so I don't know how it will be received.
                  >
                  > I also have a REAL Pictionary game and thought to go through cards and weed out the inappropriate and too difficult cards.
                  >
                  > William
                  >
                  >
                  > >
                  > > --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@ > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Does anyone have any really cool art games to play on bus cancellation/ snow days for highschool students?
                  > > > I have just been given Prestel's Art Game, but haven't figured out how to play it yet....
                  > > > I have a MEMO set of art images from a museum, and the kids liked that.....
                  > > > I have an old game of Pictionary (but some of the words are a tad inapproprate for students, or reference things they would have no idea of).....
                  > > > Sue
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >

                • Sue Stevens
                  Wow - there s been some really good ideas for new games for me to use in the classroom - thanks everyone for sharing! I figured I would share a few also.... I
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 8, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Wow - there's been some really good ideas for new games for me to use in the classroom - thanks everyone for sharing!
                    I figured I would share a few also....
                     
                    I was given a MEMO game (featuring art from some museum) last year which my DC kids loved to play.....and so did the senior student who hung around my room at that time.  I'm buying another Memory game from England (can't buy it in Canada), but have family connections in England.....figured it was not expensive and good to have around the classroom - these are more recognizable images for the students.
                     
                    Also, I like playing bingo with my students.....(my mum jokes that I'm teaching the kids to gamble!)......I made up sheets of images in a grid - for example, my Greek/Roman/Medieval review bingo has something like 40 images/clipart on it.  All the images are things that we've learned (ie:  a picture of a barrel vault, or a picture of a flying buttress, etc.) and are sized to fit properly on the blank bingo sheet.  Each student also gets one 'blank' bingo sheet that I made up - a standard bingo card, with the free space in the middle.  Students then need to select 24 of the images, cut them off the first sheet, and then glue them down onto their bingo card.......and bingo bango - a class set of different bingo sheets!  I use one of the image sheets as my master - I cut them all up and put the images in a cup so I can randomly pull them out.  I usually start easy, pulling the images and saying things like "flying buttress"....but will over the course of the games, switch to the definitions like "this structure was added to the outside of cathedrals to carry the weight of the roof", or "this structure transfers the weight of the roof off and down to the ground" or to facts that they need to know about something (so rather than pulling the image and saying "Pantheon", I might say "this structure has the largest un-reinforced concrete dome in the world".  etc.   I have master image sheets made up for Egypt, Greek/Roman, and Greek/Roman/Medieval at this time.  It is more a review, rather than a 'snow day' game, but I thought I would share.  Also, I have a huge set of plastic bingo counters - I originally bought coloured plastic math counters (which were very expensive!) but have now found them at dollar stores....so I don't get so upset when I find one or two on the floor!  Oh, and yes, we play all the standards - single line, double line, letter X, letter T, four corners, inside square, outside square, and full card (I used to work bingos when I was in highschool!).  Oh, and another thought - sometimes I have the students switch cards with someone else halfway through the games - that way they are reviewing different terms.  Also, as a standard rule - if the images aren't actually stuck down onto the bingo card, they can't win a prize (too easy to cheat!)!. 
                     
                    Sue
                  • Kelli Wilke
                    One idea I ve been wanting to do but haven t yet is Art Jenga.  I ve purchased a cheap Jenga game and painted the pieces different colors.  Then you can
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 8, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      One idea I've been wanting to do but haven't yet is Art Jenga.  I've purchased a cheap Jenga game and painted the pieces different colors.  Then you can make up your own cards that each player has to draw from before their turn.  A card may say something like "a primary color" and then they have to move a piece that is one of the three primary colors.  I may have gotten this idea from someone on this board a few years ago.  I don't remember.  Anyway,the only problem I ran into was that after I painted the pieces they weren't as slick so they wouldn't slide.  I'm not sure what kind of finish is needed to help the pieces slide better.  Any suggestions?
                       
                      Kelli in NE

                      --- On Sat, 8/8/09, Sue Stevens <suestevens@...> wrote:

                      From: Sue Stevens <suestevens@...>
                      Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: Games?
                      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Saturday, August 8, 2009, 4:07 PM

                       
                      Wow - there's been some really good ideas for new games for me to use in the classroom - thanks everyone for sharing!
                      I figured I would share a few also....
                       
                      I was given a MEMO game (featuring art from some museum) last year which my DC kids loved to play.....and so did the senior student who hung around my room at that time.  I'm buying another Memory game from England (can't buy it in Canada), but have family connections in England..... figured it was not expensive and good to have around the classroom - these are more recognizable images for the students.
                       
                      Also, I like playing bingo with my students.... .(my mum jokes that I'm teaching the kids to gamble!).... ..I made up sheets of images in a grid - for example, my Greek/Roman/ Medieval review bingo has something like 40 images/clipart on it.  All the images are things that we've learned (ie:  a picture of a barrel vault, or a picture of a flying buttress, etc.) and are sized to fit properly on the blank bingo sheet.  Each student also gets one 'blank' bingo sheet that I made up - a standard bingo card, with the free space in the middle.  Students then need to select 24 of the images, cut them off the first sheet, and then glue them down onto their bingo card.......and bingo bango - a class set of different bingo sheets!  I use one of the image sheets as my master - I cut them all up and put the images in a cup so I can randomly pull them out.  I usually start easy, pulling the images and saying things like "flying buttress"... .but will over the course of the games, switch to the definitions like "this structure was added to the outside of cathedrals to carry the weight of the roof", or "this structure transfers the weight of the roof off and down to the ground" or to facts that they need to know about something (so rather than pulling the image and saying "Pantheon", I might say "this structure has the largest un-reinforced concrete dome in the world".  etc.   I have master image sheets made up for Egypt, Greek/Roman, and Greek/Roman/ Medieval at this time.  It is more a review, rather than a 'snow day' game, but I thought I would share.  Also, I have a huge set of plastic bingo counters - I originally bought coloured plastic math counters (which were very expensive!) but have now found them at dollar stores....so I don't get so upset when I find one or two on the floor!  Oh, and yes, we play all the standards - single line, double line, letter X, letter T, four corners, inside square, outside square, and full card (I used to work bingos when I was in highschool!) .  Oh, and another thought - sometimes I have the students switch cards with someone else halfway through the games - that way they are reviewing different terms.  Also, as a standard rule - if the images aren't actually stuck down onto the bingo card, they can't win a prize (too easy to cheat!)!. 
                       
                      Sue

                    • kamla ravikumar
                      Hi ,   Carry a table top easle which can be folded and is easy to carry around.Lots of paper, and just essential art materials like pencil /eraser /sketch
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 8, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi ,
                         
                        Carry a table top easle which can be folded and is easy to carry around.Lots of paper, and just essential art materials like pencil /eraser /sketch pens.
                         
                        Just like the game of story building let each student build up a painting on the paper( which is mounted on the easel ).Students will not only realise what a blank canvas experience means they will also learn "composition" ideas thorugh their mistakes .It is a lot of fun.
                         
                        Kamla,
                        Chennai, India

                      • Diane Davis
                        I play jenga with my sculpture 8th grade class to talk about balance. We first talk about radial, symmetrical and asymmetrical balance, then play jenga. Then
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 9, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I play jenga with my sculpture 8th grade class to talk about balance.
                          We first talk about radial, symmetrical and asymmetrical balance, then
                          play jenga. Then talk about which balance works best for stability,
                          which works best for height. With this in mind, we play again for
                          competition of height. We don't use cards, we just work on stability
                          and height through balance. It's a great introduction before making
                          sculptures because when their sculptures don't stand up, we have a
                          point of interest to refer to on why and what we can do about it.

                          We also use the jenga blocks as just blocks, creating the three types
                          of balance sculptures as practice. Again, to go up higher, what do
                          they need to do to the base of the sculpture, or to go wider and
                          taller on one end, what to you have to do to the other side?
                          diane

                          On Aug 8, 2009, at 9:20 PM, Kelli Wilke wrote:

                          >
                          > One idea I've been wanting to do but haven't yet is Art Jenga. I've
                          > purchased a cheap Jenga game and painted the pieces different
                          > colors. Then you can make up your own cards that each player has to
                          > draw from before their turn. A card may say something like "a
                          > primary color" and then they have to move a piece that is one of the
                          > three primary colors. I may have gotten this idea from someone on
                          > this board a few years ago. I don't remember. Anyway,the only
                          > problem I ran into was that after I painted the pieces they weren't
                          > as slick so they wouldn't slide. I'm not sure what kind of finish
                          > is needed to help the pieces slide better. Any suggestions?
                          >
                          >
                        • Diane Davis
                          I also end the year by playing pictionary with all the vocab art words from throughout the year. I ll also throw in art history and materials from around the
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 9, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I also end the year by playing pictionary with all the vocab art words
                            from throughout the year. I'll also throw in art history and materials
                            from around the room in order to break things up. Sometimes they'll
                            get things to draw as easy as point or line or scissors, other times
                            they must show pointillism or linear perspective.

                            Another good game is to have a pack of cards with descriptive words on
                            them, and a pack of cards with nouns on them. Kids have to draw what
                            they pick. The fun part comes when they get things like lonely trees,
                            confused penguins,
                            distressed home, excited grass, etc.
                            diane
                          • pent19
                            If you are in a bind (substitute) you can use http://print-bingo.com/ to create bingo cards. I call mine lingo. You can t upload pictures but you could always
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 9, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              If you are in a bind (substitute) you can use
                              http://print-bingo.com/
                              to create bingo cards. I call mine lingo. You can't upload pictures but you could always show the picture as the definition. Its quick, super easy and does all the shuffling for you. I have some on hand for emergency days by catergory and grade level (colors, elements, clay terms, artists, etc)
                              Michele
                              >
                            • Sue Stevens
                              Wow - thanks for sharing the on-line bingo generator - I ve just created a bingo game to review art terms! - original message - http://print-bingo.com/
                              Message 14 of 14 , Aug 9, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Wow - thanks for sharing the on-line bingo generator - I've just created a bingo game to review art terms! 
                                 
                                - original message -
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.