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Re: Getting kids "riled up"...

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  • Ken
    Obviously the teacher has poor classroom management and is not capable of quieting her class. Because we are all there for the kids, I believe at that point
    Message 1 of 20 , Apr 3, 2009
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      Obviously the teacher has poor classroom management and is not capable of quieting her class. Because we are all there for the kids, I believe at that point you should still let them in and then use your own management to quiet them down. Yes, it means more work for you but they will be getting more instruction time. Offering incentives and having consequences should help. Also having a transition time such as what other teachers here are suggesting might be in order. Having them wait in the hallway means they aren't getting any instruction. They may or may not quiet down while waiting in the hallway. In addition, what would you do if the teacher left when you shut the door thinking that they were now your problem?

      Again, just my opinion.

      Ken

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Julie Casebourn <juliecas@...> wrote:
      >
      > These are all great suggestions, but I have a situation to throw out at ya'll that is sort of the flip side to the problem presented in this discussion. I have a problem with classroom teachers who deliver their kids "riled up" (I have an art room)and early (before the bell while I still have a class). I have finally refused to allow entry into my room until they are quiet and calm and I have transitioned supplies and such. In fact, just yesterday, after my previous class left and the artroom was empty and ready for the group to enter.. the waiting class was so loud and rowdy, with their homeroom teacher standing by.. ignoring the noise level and pushing and shoving,.. I poked my head out the door and said.."you will not be invited into this room until you are calm and quiet".. and shut my door, leaving the teacher there to deal with the noise and craziness she had allowed to escalate. After about 1 minute, I checked on them.. still crazy and
      > the classroom teacher unable to calm them down.. I repeated my statement and closed the door. After about 5 minutes of her planning period getting burned up and art time ticking away... they got quiet and came in.
      > My question is.. does this happen in your school and if so.. how do you tactfully handle teachers and classes that are rude and clueless with behavior and time management?
      >
    • shellysart
      Thank you to all that posted with great ideas. I was really steaming yesterday as I could not understand why said teachers did not just voice their concerns to
      Message 2 of 20 , Apr 3, 2009
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        Thank you to all that posted with great ideas. I was really steaming yesterday as I could not understand why said teachers did not just voice their concerns to me personally as I would have been happy to hear their feedback and take any suggestions. Instead they went to the principal......that really hurt my feelings and I felt it unwarranted. I had no idea they were having problems. I like the idea of having some quieting down time after the project. I only have 45 minutes with these kids and we are pushing it as it is with completing them. Sometimes we run over. I will try and build in these techniques to my curriculum. We do sometimes read stories and I usually show examples of the elements we are studying at the beginning of class, plus the stickers for answering Art related questions. Maybe I could save some of this for the end of class. I don't know what I would do without this group. Obviously the classroom teachers have no intention of "helping me help them" so I only have you guys! Thanks again.

        Shelly

        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com]
        > On Behalf Of shellysart
        > Sent: Thursday, April 02, 2009 8:57 AM
        > To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [art_education] Getting kids "riled up"...
        >
        >
        >
        > Hello All,
        >
        > I am a new Art on a Cart teacher at an elementary school. This was my first
        > year. I had a meeting with an administrator that handles these programs
        > yesterday as she had gotten some feedback from my K-3rd teachers regarding
        > their experience this year.
        >
        > She really focused on what the teachers called "classroom management". Seems
        > I get them too excited about Art and the projects and then the teachers have
        > a hard time "reeling them in" after I leave. Their words....
        >
        > Hmmmm. Not too sure how to take that. I will admit that I sometimes struggle
        > with containing the noise, which I think is normal for a new teacher, but I
        > expect that they are excited as they only get Art 6 times a year!
        >
        > My question is, does anyone else have these problems and if so, do you have
        > any words of wisdom? I had planned on using my own "shushing technique" as
        > it is hard to keep up with each teachers method. I will implement this on my
        > next rotation.
        >
        > I personally think they are being a little too harsh. At this point, we are
        > lucky to have this program, which may be cut next year, by the way, so not
        > too sure why the teachers would be making a stink. I think alot of them
        > didn't have Art in school so see it as an annoyance to their day.
        >
        > Any help is appreciated.
        >
        > Shelly in Seattle
        >
      • Julie Casebourn
            I appreciate everyone s perspective on the topic I posted.  I think we all here could agree about the difference between nonsense noise and movement
        Message 3 of 20 , Apr 3, 2009
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              I appreciate everyone's perspective on the topic I posted.  I think we all here could agree about the difference between nonsense noise and movement vs. productive buzz.noise during the throws of creating and  noise and inappropriate behavior during transitions between teachers.  I guess it boils down to respect and management.  I have discussed (several times over the years) with my principal the issue of early drop-off/late pick-up and the issue of unattended students in the hallway while I still have a class going on (there are teachers in the building that leave their kids unsupervised and return to their room). My principal has addressed the issue numerous times at faculty meetings and in e-mails, still, there are those that don't conform.
                To get to the nitty gritty, he has told me that my responsibilty/liability does not begin until students are in my room.  If a teacher abandons their students in the hallway, if I refuse entry because of horendous behavior, if a teacher is late picking up and the bell has rung I "technically" am not responsible for them.  Now, I HATE to have to even define the moments and issues within the context of who and who isn't liable or responsible for the class.  I would much rather have the attitude that we are a team, and we all should support and help each other the best way we can and that includes respecting each other's time and tolerence levels.  In my opinion, I think it is shameful that an experienced colleague would think it's ever acceptable to present their class to another teacher in such a shambles. (Shambles defined as; students yelling at each other.. "you suck", "make me", "what are you going to do about it" "big deal" "STOP IT!" etc..., shoving, pushing, hair pulling, kicking etc..) This is standard presentation for at least 3 homeroom teachers.  After my attempt at reasoning with the teachers, after principals talks and emails and no change,  I feel a big point needs to be made to the classes and especially the homeroom teachers, thus... the refusal to allow entry into my room.  Yes.. once the students enter the art room.. I talk to them. ..calm them down.. and yes time is burned doing this week after week.  My choice to refuse entry is an extreme one and not the first option I would ever select in mild cases of a class being a tad unruly.  I just think extreme circumstances requires extreme solutions.  I have also invited my principal to "hang around the art room" when these particular 3 classes drop off so he can witness the exchange.. he hasn't come yet. 

        • pent19
          We are encouraging power teaching in our school (you tube or teacher tube it). It is a great universal way to get childrens atttention. I just transferred to
          Message 4 of 20 , Apr 3, 2009
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            We are encouraging power teaching in our school (you tube or teacher tube it). It is a great universal way to get childrens atttention. I just transferred to elementary after 2 years at a highschool and am up for tenure this year so My principal including me (!) in the power teaching workshop to help me with classroom management. The idea is pretty simple, you say class and they say yes in the same voice (you can draw it out, high pitch, low pitch etc). I also add a clap. Then I say eyes on me hands are free and they put down what ever they are working with (the clap should have all ready done that) and they know i have a quick announcement or idea. its takes practice, but students who pick up materials have a 1-2 minute T.O. from their project.
            As far as having them riled up for us! well...i just love it when they have parties before art class and come to me all sugared up or the specials schedules are re-arranged to accommodate all that mandated testing. The students are out of routine and are off the walls!
            Hope this helps!
            Michele
          • taranight
            Hi, I am also a new art-on-a-cart teacher with no cart. I hope you got some positive feedback as well. Some people are natural born classroom management
            Message 5 of 20 , Apr 3, 2009
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              Hi, I am also a new 'art-on-a-cart' teacher with no cart. I hope you got some positive feedback as well. Some people are natural born classroom management experts it seems while others, like us, have to learn and work at it. The first few years of teaching are a lot of trial and error and it is nice if teachers with more experience can lend some advice on things they have already tried that work!

              Have you thought about handing out an art award at the end of every lesson? It is worth packing up and cleaning up early, settling them all on the rug or at their desks to review the lesson and hand out an art award. Keep track of who wins and try to get it so everyone gets one by the end of the year if you can in 6 lessons a year! You can print off your own awards on the computer, print them in different colors and fill out the award certificate right there in front of the student. I usually just do the clap/repeat thing and wait as long as I have to for silence and attention.

              I also do silent art time... I try not to do is as a "punishment" but for focusing and thinking time and if someone talks I add another minute, which does make it seem a bit like a punishment but oh well, it works for the little ones very well!

              I know you want to use every last second of the lesson time for hands on art time like I always do, right? But the art is only part of the whole experience of teaching a room full of kids and you should definitely allot time for classroom management because in the end you will have better quality lessons that way anyway. I am still learning to do all this myself and will be implementing an art award next term. good luck. Teaching art room to room is very challenging and you are getting into other people's space. Teachers can be very territorial! I have one teacher constantly wiping the desks as the kids work the whole time! That's another post...


              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "shellysart" <shellysart@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello All,
              >
              > I am a new Art on a Cart teacher at an elementary school. This was my first year. I had a meeting with an administrator that handles these programs yesterday as she had gotten some feedback from my K-3rd teachers regarding their experience this year.
              >
              > She really focused on what the teachers called "classroom management". Seems I get them too excited about Art and the projects and then the teachers have a hard time "reeling them in" after I leave. Their words....
              >
              > Hmmmm. Not too sure how to take that. I will admit that I sometimes struggle with containing the noise, which I think is normal for a new teacher, but I expect that they are excited as they only get Art 6 times a year!
              >
              > My question is, does anyone else have these problems and if so, do you have any words of wisdom? I had planned on using my own "shushing technique" as it is hard to keep up with each teachers method. I will implement this on my next rotation.
              >
              > I personally think they are being a little too harsh. At this point, we are lucky to have this program, which may be cut next year, by the way, so not too sure why the teachers would be making a stink. I think alot of them didn't have Art in school so see it as an annoyance to their day.
              >
              > Any help is appreciated.
              >
              > Shelly in Seattle
              >
            • Dan Triplett
              I m somewhat new to this list (been lurking a while) but as a teacher with 20 years experience, 10 at art, I can tell you that the noise has always been an
              Message 6 of 20 , Jun 8, 2009
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                I'm somewhat new to this list (been lurking a while) but as a teacher with 20 years experience, 10 at art, I can tell you that the "noise" has always been an issue for me. It's a constant struggle because on the one hand, engaging verbally in their art work can be a very good thing, but on the other hand, art is a brain activity and chatter can interfere with the doing of the art.

                I use a timer. I can add the link as I found it online. I display it via my video display. I give them 7 mins of time to work quietly, and I monitor it closely. Then I give them 3 mins of a "brain break." Here they can relax, stretch, quietly share their work with others, and then it's back to 7 mins of no talking. This is working for me.

                I base the 7 mins of quiet work on brain research I recently heard about where students can give full focus for about 7 mins and then they need a "shift" to something else (but then can go back to 7 mins of focused work).

                I hope this makes sense. I also play music in the background and have taught my students the importance of allowing their brains the right amount of concentration time in order to do their best work. I tell them it's impossible to do art well if they are engaged in conversations the entire time so we work hard to keep those to a minimum. ;)

                Dan Triplett
                Art Teacher
                Bordeaux Elementary

                ________________________________________
                From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of shellysart [shellysart@...]
                Sent: Thursday, April 02, 2009 7:57 AM
                To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [art_education] Getting kids "riled up"...

                Hello All,

                I am a new Art on a Cart teacher at an elementary school. This was my first year. I had a meeting with an administrator that handles these programs yesterday as she had gotten some feedback from my K-3rd teachers regarding their experience this year.

                She really focused on what the teachers called "classroom management". Seems I get them too excited about Art and the projects and then the teachers have a hard time "reeling them in" after I leave. Their words....

                Hmmmm. Not too sure how to take that. I will admit that I sometimes struggle with containing the noise, which I think is normal for a new teacher, but I expect that they are excited as they only get Art 6 times a year!

                My question is, does anyone else have these problems and if so, do you have any words of wisdom? I had planned on using my own "shushing technique" as it is hard to keep up with each teachers method. I will implement this on my next rotation.

                I personally think they are being a little too harsh. At this point, we are lucky to have this program, which may be cut next year, by the way, so not too sure why the teachers would be making a stink. I think alot of them didn't have Art in school so see it as an annoyance to their day.

                Any help is appreciated.

                Shelly in Seattle
              • Alyssa
                I have a higher tolerance for noise and movement than most teachers so I am sometimes in the same boat. What I do to transition back is have a 3-4 minute art
                Message 7 of 20 , Jun 9, 2009
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                  I have a higher tolerance for noise and movement than most teachers so I am sometimes in the same boat. What I do to transition back is have a 3-4 minute art discussion at the end of the lesson. We talk about what they liked, what they learned, etc. It sort of brings them back down after art.
                  Dan-Would you please post the link...I like that idea, too.
                  Alyssa



                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Dan Triplett <dtriplett@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I'm somewhat new to this list (been lurking a while) but as a teacher with 20 years experience, 10 at art, I can tell you that the "noise" has always been an issue for me. It's a constant struggle because on the one hand, engaging verbally in their art work can be a very good thing, but on the other hand, art is a brain activity and chatter can interfere with the doing of the art.
                  >
                  > I use a timer. I can add the link as I found it online. I display it via my video display. I give them 7 mins of time to work quietly, and I monitor it closely. Then I give them 3 mins of a "brain break." Here they can relax, stretch, quietly share their work with others, and then it's back to 7 mins of no talking. This is working for me.
                  >
                  > I base the 7 mins of quiet work on brain research I recently heard about where students can give full focus for about 7 mins and then they need a "shift" to something else (but then can go back to 7 mins of focused work).
                  >
                  > I hope this makes sense. I also play music in the background and have taught my students the importance of allowing their brains the right amount of concentration time in order to do their best work. I tell them it's impossible to do art well if they are engaged in conversations the entire time so we work hard to keep those to a minimum. ;)
                  >
                  > Dan Triplett
                  > Art Teacher
                  > Bordeaux Elementary
                  >
                  > ________________________________________
                  > From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of shellysart [shellysart@...]
                  > Sent: Thursday, April 02, 2009 7:57 AM
                  > To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [art_education] Getting kids "riled up"...
                  >
                  > Hello All,
                  >
                  > I am a new Art on a Cart teacher at an elementary school. This was my first year. I had a meeting with an administrator that handles these programs yesterday as she had gotten some feedback from my K-3rd teachers regarding their experience this year.
                  >
                  > She really focused on what the teachers called "classroom management". Seems I get them too excited about Art and the projects and then the teachers have a hard time "reeling them in" after I leave. Their words....
                  >
                  > Hmmmm. Not too sure how to take that. I will admit that I sometimes struggle with containing the noise, which I think is normal for a new teacher, but I expect that they are excited as they only get Art 6 times a year!
                  >
                  > My question is, does anyone else have these problems and if so, do you have any words of wisdom? I had planned on using my own "shushing technique" as it is hard to keep up with each teachers method. I will implement this on my next rotation.
                  >
                  > I personally think they are being a little too harsh. At this point, we are lucky to have this program, which may be cut next year, by the way, so not too sure why the teachers would be making a stink. I think alot of them didn't have Art in school so see it as an annoyance to their day.
                  >
                  > Any help is appreciated.
                  >
                  > Shelly in Seattle
                  >
                • Monica Gabehart
                  Did you have that link for the timer? I would like to give this a try. Monica
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jun 9, 2009
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                    Re: [art_education] Getting kids "riled up"... Did you have that link for the timer?
                    I would like to give this a try.
                    Monica


                    On 6/8/09 9:30 PM, "Dan Triplett" <dtriplett@...> wrote:


                      

                      

                    I'm somewhat new to this list (been lurking a while) but as a teacher with 20 years experience, 10 at art, I can tell you that the "noise" has always been an issue for me.  It's a constant struggle because on the one hand, engaging verbally in their art work can be a very good thing, but on the other hand, art is a brain activity and chatter can interfere with the doing of the art.

                    I use a timer.  I can add the link as I found it online.  I display it via my video display.  I give them 7 mins of time to work quietly, and I monitor it closely.  Then I give them 3 mins of a "brain break."  Here they can relax, stretch, quietly share their work with others, and then it's back to 7 mins of no talking.  This is working for me.

                    I base the 7 mins of quiet work on brain research I recently heard about where students can give full focus for about 7 mins and then they need a "shift" to something else (but then can go back to 7 mins of focused work).

                    I hope this makes sense.  I also play music in the background and have taught my students the importance of allowing their brains the right amount of concentration time in order to do their best work.   I tell them it's impossible to do art well if they are engaged in conversations the entire time so we work hard to keep those to a minimum.  ;)

                    Dan Triplett
                    Art Teacher
                    Bordeaux Elementary

                    ________________________________________
                    From: art_education@yahoogroups.com <mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com>  [art_education@yahoogroups.com <mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of shellysart [shellysart@... <mailto:shellysart%40yahoo.com> ]
                    Sent: Thursday, April 02, 2009 7:57 AM
                    To: art_education@yahoogroups.com <mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Subject: [art_education] Getting kids "riled up"...

                    Hello All,

                    I am a new Art on a Cart teacher at an elementary school. This was my first year. I had a meeting with an administrator that handles these programs yesterday as she had gotten some feedback from my K-3rd teachers regarding their experience this year.

                    She really focused on what the teachers called "classroom management". Seems I get them too excited about Art and the projects and then the teachers have a hard time "reeling them in" after I leave. Their words....

                    Hmmmm. Not too sure how to take that. I will admit that I sometimes struggle with containing the noise, which I think is normal for a new teacher, but I expect that they are excited as they only get Art 6 times a year!

                    My question is, does anyone else have these problems and if so, do you have any words of wisdom? I had planned on using my own "shushing technique" as it is hard to keep up with each teachers method. I will implement this on my next rotation.

                    I personally think they are being a little too harsh. At this point, we are lucky to have this program, which may be cut next year, by the way, so not too sure why the teachers would be making a stink. I think alot of them didn't have Art in school so see it as an annoyance to their day.

                    Any help is appreciated.

                    Shelly in Seattle

                      
                        



                  • Dan Triplett
                    Thanks for sharing Alyssa. That s a great idea and I think I ll try that next year. Maybe it will help with cleanup which can sometimes get too crazy. Here s
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jun 24, 2009
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                      Thanks for sharing Alyssa. That's a great idea and I think I'll try that next year. Maybe it will help with cleanup which can sometimes get too crazy.

                      Here's one online timer I use: http://www.online-stopwatch.com/eggtimer-countdown/full-screen/

                      Here's one I've downloaded (it's the one the trainer used at staff training - where the 7 mins idea came from) this particular timer has great features but I've used both.

                      http://www.ncrtec.org/timer/


                      Dan Triplett
                      Art Teacher
                      Bordeaux Elementary
                      http://artmakeskidssmart.blogspot.com/
                      ________________________________________
                      From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alyssa [h8n2w8@...]
                      Sent: Tuesday, June 09, 2009 7:28 AM
                      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [art_education] Re: Getting kids "riled up"...

                      I have a higher tolerance for noise and movement than most teachers so I am sometimes in the same boat. What I do to transition back is have a 3-4 minute art discussion at the end of the lesson. We talk about what they liked, what they learned, etc. It sort of brings them back down after art.
                      Dan-Would you please post the link...I like that idea, too.
                      Alyssa

                      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com<mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com>, Dan Triplett <dtriplett@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I'm somewhat new to this list (been lurking a while) but as a teacher with 20 years experience, 10 at art, I can tell you that the "noise" has always been an issue for me. It's a constant struggle because on the one hand, engaging verbally in their art work can be a very good thing, but on the other hand, art is a brain activity and chatter can interfere with the doing of the art.
                      >
                      > I use a timer. I can add the link as I found it online. I display it via my video display. I give them 7 mins of time to work quietly, and I monitor it closely. Then I give them 3 mins of a "brain break." Here they can relax, stretch, quietly share their work with others, and then it's back to 7 mins of no talking. This is working for me.
                      >
                      > I base the 7 mins of quiet work on brain research I recently heard about where students can give full focus for about 7 mins and then they need a "shift" to something else (but then can go back to 7 mins of focused work).
                      >
                      > I hope this makes sense. I also play music in the background and have taught my students the importance of allowing their brains the right amount of concentration time in order to do their best work. I tell them it's impossible to do art well if they are engaged in conversations the entire time so we work hard to keep those to a minimum. ;)
                      >
                      > Dan Triplett
                      > Art Teacher
                      > Bordeaux Elementary
                      >
                      > ________________________________________
                      > From: art_education@yahoogroups.com<mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com> [art_education@yahoogroups.com<mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of shellysart [shellysart@...]
                      > Sent: Thursday, April 02, 2009 7:57 AM
                      > To: art_education@yahoogroups.com<mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > Subject: [art_education] Getting kids "riled up"...
                      >
                      > Hello All,
                      >
                      > I am a new Art on a Cart teacher at an elementary school. This was my first year. I had a meeting with an administrator that handles these programs yesterday as she had gotten some feedback from my K-3rd teachers regarding their experience this year.
                      >
                      > She really focused on what the teachers called "classroom management". Seems I get them too excited about Art and the projects and then the teachers have a hard time "reeling them in" after I leave. Their words....
                      >
                      > Hmmmm. Not too sure how to take that. I will admit that I sometimes struggle with containing the noise, which I think is normal for a new teacher, but I expect that they are excited as they only get Art 6 times a year!
                      >
                      > My question is, does anyone else have these problems and if so, do you have any words of wisdom? I had planned on using my own "shushing technique" as it is hard to keep up with each teachers method. I will implement this on my next rotation.
                      >
                      > I personally think they are being a little too harsh. At this point, we are lucky to have this program, which may be cut next year, by the way, so not too sure why the teachers would be making a stink. I think alot of them didn't have Art in school so see it as an annoyance to their day.
                      >
                      > Any help is appreciated.
                      >
                      > Shelly in Seattle
                      >
                    • keliri@sbcglobal.net
                      Shelly, Funny you seem to have the opposite problem that I have. I teach elementary art in Texas. Teachers know they are getting a prep period (break) when
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jun 25, 2009
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                        Shelly,
                        Funny you seem to have the opposite problem that I have. I teach elementary art in Texas. Teachers know they are getting a "prep" period (break) when they bring their kids to me, so frequently, the attitude of taking a break or playtime is relayed to the students, causing them to get riled up as they enter my room. Then I have to calm them down in order to start the lesson! I also have problems with the noise level.
                        I have students always sit in assigned seats. I can usually figure out how to split them up for the best results.
                        I use a point system, as do the other "specials" teachers. I put 5 check marks or points on the board at the beggining of class. Sometimes I get creative and turn the points into parts of a drawing. If students are too noisy, I start erasing points. Points are tallied for each class, each grading period, and awards are given to the class with the most points (or highest average points). You can use your imagination for rewards- Sometimes I let them bring a snack to art, let them sit wherever they want, or we do a special art project that the other classes do not do.
                        If they get too noisy, we go to "Silent Art". The timer is good for this. They must work silently for a set amount of minutes. 4 minutes for 4th grade, for example. It's amazing how much they accomplish during these silent times. The catch is, if someone breaks the silence before the time is up, I start the clock over. Most times, the students want to get it over with, and it works pretty well.
                        For cleaning up, I always allow at least 5 minutes. Each table of students is responsible for cleaning their area. Parameters for cleaning up are set the first week of school. A place for everything, and everything in it's place.
                        We cannot line up unless everyone is quiet.
                        For the younger kids, When dismissing, they cannot leave the room unless they pay me a "ticket"- being a scrap of paper or something they picked up off the floor. I am the ticket taker at the door, and they toss their "ticket" in thrash as they leave the room. It's fun and the kids like it.
                        A little background info: I did a paper for one of my grad classes on why students seemed to behave differently in my art classroom. There is actually some science behind it. Some students have trouble switching their brain function from left to right in order to get into a creative mode. Either they cannot do it, or they resist it. So they misbehave, talk or whatever to procrastinate the brain switch. I found this to be especially true at the middle school level.
                        There are Right Brain art activities on the net- some quick little exercises that might help students transition from left to right brain activity.
                        I hope this helps!
                        Rita Martin
                      • shellysart
                        Hi Rita, Well, I did this post quite a while ago and have managed to resolve the problem since. I developed my own tactics for getting them to stop what ever
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                          Hi Rita,

                          Well, I did this post quite a while ago and have managed to resolve the problem since. I developed my own "tactics" for getting them to stop what ever they are doing at the time and put "eyes on me". Also, I made a very simple print out of my 3 expectations with them when I am in their class. This seems to be very effective as the expectations are very simple and ones that they have with their own teachers. It was the end of the year, this last rotation, so I challenged them to remember the 3 expectations when they are in the next higher grade in the fall. Afterward, there was a "meeting" about my performance with the teachers and they could not say enough nice things about me. I guess I managed to calm them down to the teacher's satisfaction. I am, in general, not a strict person and want the kids to have fun, but do see the value in keeping them on task. Especially as we have such limited time. Thank you all for your continued support.!

                          Shelly in Seattle
                          '
                          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "keliri@..." <keliri@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Shelly,
                          > Funny you seem to have the opposite problem that I have. I teach elementary art in Texas. Teachers know they are getting a "prep" period (break) when they bring their kids to me, so frequently, the attitude of taking a break or playtime is relayed to the students, causing them to get riled up as they enter my room. Then I have to calm them down in order to start the lesson! I also have problems with the noise level.
                          > I hope this helps!
                          > Rita Martin
                          >
                        • shellysart
                          Hello again, Judy has asked that I share my 3 expectations with the group. They are: 1; Sit quietly in your seat 2; Listen to directions 3; Raise your hand if
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                            Hello again,

                            Judy has asked that I share my 3 expectations with the group. They are: 1; Sit quietly in your seat 2; Listen to directions 3; Raise your hand if you have a question (or need suppies). It is amazing that once I said these in class, they immediately followed them. There are always the ones who don't listen, but it is hilarious how their neighbors that do, will remind them of the rules! I was spending alot of time explaining the project or directions over and over as kids were not listening or visiting with their neighbors. I had little kids this year (k-3), so may differ a bit next year when I have the whole school (k-6).

                            Thanks,

                            Shelly in Seattle

                            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "keliri@..." <keliri@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Shelly,
                            > Funny you seem to have the opposite problem that I have. I teach elementary art in Texas. Teachers know they are getting a "prep" period (break) when they bring their kids to me, so frequently, the attitude of taking a break or playtime is relayed to the students, causing them to get riled up as they enter my room. Then I have to calm them down in order to start the lesson! I also have problems with the noise level.
                            > I hope this helps!
                            > Rita Martin
                            >
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